World News

Parallels
6:19 am
Wed November 20, 2013

World Headlines: Indonesia-Australia Spying Feud Deepens

Reports say Australia spied on Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. On Monday, Indonesia said it was downgrading relations with Australia.
Beawiharta Reuters /Landov

Indonesia, Jakarta Post

Indonesia says it has scaled down its diplomatic relations and its level of cooperation with Australia in the wake of reports that Australia's security services spied on Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and other top officials.

"We have downgraded the level of relations between Indonesia and Australia," Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa said. "Like a faucet, it is turned down."

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The Two-Way
5:01 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Life Is Slowly Returning To Shattered Philippine City

Some people marched in the rain Tuesday in the Philippine city of Tacloban, which was crushed by Typhoon Haiyan.
David Guttenfelder AP
  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Anthony Kuhn, in the Philippines, talks with Steve Inskeep

There was almost nothing left standing or working in the Philippines city of Tacloban after Typhoon Haiyan tore through on Nov. 8.

No electricity. No clean water. No undamaged buildings.

As one official told NPR's Anthony Kuhn, "we have citizens, but no city."

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Middle East
4:08 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Talks On Iran's Nuclear Program Try Again For Deal

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 5:34 am

Negotiators from Iran and six world powers are back in Geneva for another round of talks on Tehran's nuclear program. There are signals that a preliminary deal over the future of Iran's nuclear program may finally be within in reach.

Typhoon Haiyan Devastates The Philippines
3:46 am
Wed November 20, 2013

One By One, Businesses Reopen In Typhoon-Hit Tacloban

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 7:50 am

Since the typhoon hit the Philippines, doing business in the hardest-hit city of Tacloban has been next to impossible But on Wednesday, five gas stations, two hardware stores and several banks reopened.

Typhoon Haiyan Devastates The Philippines
3:41 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Tacloban Stores Slowly Reopen But Debris Cleaning Is Ongoing

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 5:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Our colleague Anthony Kuhn has departed Tacloban, the city in the Philippines hardest hit by a typhoon. Anthony covered the early days of a disaster that left around 4,000 people dead and has displaced four million more. And now that he's in Manila, Anthony is going to try to help us get some perspective on what happened. He's on the line.

Hi, Anthony.

ANTHONY KUHN, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

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Middle East
2:44 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Declassified Documents Shed Light On Camp David Peace Talks

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 7:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Thirty-five years ago the U.S. negotiated an historic peace deal between Israel and Egypt. Over 13 long days at the presidential retreat Camp David, President Jimmy Carter walked a delicate line to get Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israel Prime Minister Menachem Begin to reach an agreement. Now we're learning more details of how they succeeded. Last week, the CIA declassified 1,400 of pages of documents related to those Camp David peace talks.

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Sports
2:44 am
Wed November 20, 2013

World Cup Qualifying Match Tests Cairo's Security

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 5:34 am

Ghana qualifies for its third straight World Cup — defeating Egypt 7-3 on total goals after a 2-1 loss. This was the first international match in Cairo in two years. A bloody soccer riot there left dozens dead in 2011. It was also the first match since authorities lifted the curfew that went into effect after widespread clashes between security forces and Muslim Brotherhood supporters, protesting the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi.

Middle East
2:44 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Israelis Disagree On How To Keep Iran From Nuclear Weapons

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 7:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been lobbying hard against an agreement with Iran that would ease economic sanctions if it allows Tehran to continue enriching nuclear material in any way. Israelis overwhelmingly agree that the Iranians should not be allowed to develop a nuclear weapon.

The difference of opinion comes on the range of views of how to stop them. NPR's Emily Harris reports.

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Africa
2:32 am
Wed November 20, 2013

In Nigeria's Bloody Fight, Who's Gaining The Upper Hand?

Men walk amid rubble after Boko Haram militants raided the town of Benisheik in northeast Nigeria, on Sept. 19. The Islamist group has been waging an insurgency in northern and central Nigeria for the past four years and was recently placed on the U.S. list of terrorist groups.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 8:51 am

For four years, the Islamist militants of Boko Haram have been waging a deadly campaign in northern and central Nigeria, killing thousands of people. In response, the Nigerian military is cracking down on the group, and the United States last week designated Boko Haram a terrorist organization.

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Parallels
3:50 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Londoners Urged To Cycle, But Commute Can Be Treacherous

Cyclists negotiate rush hour traffic in central London on Nov. 15. Fourteen London cyclists have died so far this year, all in accidents involving heavy goods vehicles.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 5:30 pm

London's colorful mayor, Boris Johnson, has made it a priority to get more of his constituents on two wheels. But a series of deaths on the city's roads have shaken cyclists and noncyclists alike.

The number of Londoners cycling to work has more than doubled in the past decade. On some roads, cyclists now make up more than half the rush hour traffic.

And for years, Johnson has been among them. Many think the London mayor has his eye on Prime Minister David Cameron's job.

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Afghanistan
3:37 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Afghan Elders Will Decide Future Of U.S. Troops After 2014

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 3:54 pm

Some 3,000 Afghan elders will assemble on Thursday in Kabul to consider a new security agreement with the U.S. The document will spell out the rules for American forces in Afghanistan troops after their combat mission ends in December 2014. U.S. officials say between 6,000 and 9,000 US troops would remain to train Afghan security forces and conduct counter-terror missions against al-Qaeda and other anti-government forces. That counter-terror mission remains a sticking point, though most other issues — like potential criminal liability of Americans in Afghanistan — have been resolved.

Europe
3:37 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Death Of British Spy Found Shoved Into Bag Ruled Accidental

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 3:54 pm

In 2010, British spy Gareth Williams was found dead, naked, and stuffed inside a duffel bag in his bathtub. Although a coroner initially suspected foul play, London police have determined that his death was probably an accident. Robert Siegel talks to spy historian Nigel West about the case.

Middle East
3:37 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Cautious Optimism As Iran Nuclear Talks Resume

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 7:03 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Negotiators for Iran and six world powers returned to Switzerland to discuss limiting Iran's nuclear program. After reportedly coming close to a first-step deal earlier this month, some officials say an agreement is within reach this week. But critics warn a deal would be dangerous.

NPR's Peter Kenyon is in Geneva and has this report.

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Europe
3:37 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

One-Fifth Of Norwegians Tune In To Watch Rock Star Chess Champ

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 3:54 pm

Norwegian chess player Magnus Carlsen is competing in the 2013 World Chess Championships. Melissa Block speaks with Joran Jansson, president of the Norwegian Chess Federation, for more on his rise to a number one ranking and what his popularity means for the game of chess.

The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Beyond The Caricature: 5 Things To Know About Mayor Rob Ford

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford leaves his office after councilors passed motions Monday to limit his powers.
Chris Young The Canadian Press

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 2:50 pm

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford was thrust into the international spotlight after he admitted to smoking crack. Since then, a caricature of the politician has emerged: a bumbling, error-prone addict, whose everyman persona has helped him maintain his popularity in Canada's most populous city.

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Parallels
11:57 am
Tue November 19, 2013

How Will Afghan Forces Fare As NATO Troops Draw Down?

An Afghan soldier stands guard in the western city of Herat in October. U.S. Maj. Gen. James McConville, who commands coalition forces in eastern Afghanistan, says Afghan forces did hold their ground this year, but "they're not winning by enough that the enemy is willing to stop fighting yet."
Aref Karimi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 3:54 pm

Shiite Muslims gathered in Kabul last week to celebrate Ashura, one of the holiest days on their religious calendar. Hundreds of shirtless men chanted and flogged themselves with chains tipped with knife-like shards of metal.

In the past, these public Shiite commemorations have become targets of the Taliban and other Islamist extremists. In 2011, a suicide bomber killed 56 Shiites marking Ashura. But this year, security was particularly tight.

Shopkeeper Noor Aga said the celebration was magnificent, and he felt safe.

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The Two-Way
11:30 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Typhoon Haiyan's Exact Death Toll May Never Be Known

In Tacloban, the Philippines, graffiti on the side of a grounded ship sends a message out to the world.
David Gilkey NPR

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Parallels
10:55 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Landlines, It Turns Out, Aren't Vanishing Everywhere

A Cambodian gambler talks on 18 cellphones at once at a boxing match in Phnom Penh in 2010. There are nearly 132 cellphones for every 100 Cambodians, but the country has also seen a surge in the number of landlines.
Tang Chhin Sothy AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 5:03 am

On All Things Considered, NPR's Martin Kaste reported Monday on U.S. landline infrastructure. One fact stood out: 96 percent of homes had landlines in 1998, and that number is down to 71 percent today.

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Parenting
10:17 am
Tue November 19, 2013

China Eases One Child Policy, What's Next?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Books
10:10 am
Tue November 19, 2013

'Coolie Woman' Rescues Indentured Women From Anonymity

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 12:37 pm

"Immigrant number 96153. That's how my great-grandmother was cataloged, that was the number on her immigration pass." says Gaiutra Bahadur, author of the new book Coolie Woman.

Bahadur set out to uncover her family's roots by following a paper trail of colonial archives and ship records that traced her great-grandmother's journey from a small village in India to the cane fields of Guyana.

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World
10:10 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Dominican Republic Official Defends Citizenship Ruling

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, we'll meet an author who managed to trace her own great-grandmother's journey from a small village in India to the cane fields of Guyana. We'll hear about this remarkable feat of reporting that sheds light on a system that's probably even less understood than slavery, which is indentured servitude.

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Shots - Health News
8:21 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Spiritual Healers Keep Watch For Plague In Uganda

Yoset, a spiritual healer near Arua, Uganda, works with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to detect the plague in his village.
Courtesy of Mary Hayden

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 7:28 am

When medical anthropologist Mary Hayden visits her colleague Yofet, he tells her, "Mary, you don't need to call before you arrive because I already know you're coming."

Yoset, you see, is a traditional healer in northern Uganda. "The spirit comes over him and tells him how to treat people," Hayden tells Shots.

But recently, Yoset's practice has expanded beyond the ethereal. He and about 40 other healers and herbalists are helping to track down the plague in Uganda for scientists here in the U.S.

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Parallels
6:24 am
Tue November 19, 2013

World Headlines: Argentina's Kirchner Returns To Presidency

In this frame grab from a video released by Argentina's presidency, Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez holds a gift from a supporter given to her while recovering from surgery. She returned to work Monday, meeting with Cabinet ministers and recording a video that showed her in good spirits weeks after surgery to drain blood from inside her skull.
AP

Argentina, La Nacion

She's back.

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner has resumed duties a month after undergoing brain surgery to remove a clot found during a routine examination.

"Thank you ... to the thousands of Argentines who have been praying for me," she said in a televised address.

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The Two-Way
4:40 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Two Explosions, Multiple Deaths At Iranian Embassy In Beirut

This car was among many vehicles destroyed by bombs Tuesday in Beirut. Nearby buildings suffered extensive damage. More than 20 people, including an Iran diplomat, were killed by the explosions near Iran's embassy.
Nabil Mounzer EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 7:02 am

Twin explosions Tuesday near the Iranian embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, killed more than 20 people, including Iran's cultural attaché, according to reports from The Associated Press and other news outlets. Dozens more people were injured.

From Beirut, producer Rima Marrouch tells our Newscast Desk that the blasts happened around 10 a.m. local time (3 a.m. ET).

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Middle East
4:15 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Iranian Cultural Attache Killed In Beirut Blasts

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 7:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Two car bombs exploded in Beirut, Lebanon today. They exploded near the embassy of Iran in that city. The roughly two dozens dead include Iran's cultural attaché, we're told. The bombings draw attention for their violence, for their apparent target, Iran, and for the location. Lebanon is next door to Syria where Iran is deeply involved in a civil war supporting the government of President Bashar al Assad.

Let's go next to the New York Times Beirut bureau chief Anne Barnard. She's on the line from there. Hi, Anne.

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Middle East
3:41 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Back To The Future: Calls Grow For A Military Ruler In Egypt

An Egyptian woman kisses a poster of Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi as she arrives at Cairo's Tahrir Square to mark the 40th anniversary of the 1973 Arab-Israeli war last month. Many are calling for the general to run for president next year, but so far he has remained coy.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

For nearly three years Egyptians have battled for a different, and better, future. But the transition has been tumultuous, filled with pitfalls, death and disappointment.

Today, many are ready to settle for a return to the pre-revolution status quo: a strong, military man who can guide Egypt back to stability.

At the Kakao lounge in central Cairo, teenage girls sample chocolates that bear the face of Egyptian military chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi. The chocolates depict Sissi in sunglasses, Sissi saluting and Sissi's face in ornate chocolate frames.

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Typhoon Haiyan Devastates The Philippines
2:49 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

How And Where Should We Rebuild After Natural Disasters?

The wreckage in Tacloban, Philippines, on Nov. 16 was overwhelming, after Typhoon Haiyan plowed through.
David P. Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

The physical damage from Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines is catastrophic. Hundreds of thousands of people are now homeless.

Soon, though, people will start to rebuild, as they have after similar natural disasters.

How they do it, and where, is increasingly important in places like the Philippines. The island nation lies in a sort of "typhoon alley," and with climate change and rising sea levels, there are more storms in store.

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Asia
2:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

For Filipinos Displaced By Haiyan, The Struggle Continues

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

The United Nations now estimates almost two million people were displaced by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. And many of those survivors now find themselves living in quickly built shacks amidst the debris, without jobs, possessions or community.

NPR's Jason Beaubien has the story of one woman who lost her simple home on the coast of Leyte Province.

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Africa
2:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Kenyan Investigators Scale Back Number Of Mall Attackers

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

We turn now to Kenya for an update on the gunmen who attacked a popular Nairobi mall in September, killing dozens. Authorities now believe there were only four attackers. They say they know the identity of two of them. And they're zeroing in on their activities in the weeks leading up to the attack, where they plotted the assault, what weapons they used.

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Asia
2:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Damaged Fuel Rods Removed At Fukushima Nuclear Plant

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

Workers at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant successfully removed some radioactive fuel from one of the damaged reactors on Monday. It's an important first step, but there's a long way to go before the situation at the plant can be said to be completely under control

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