World News

World
3:02 am
Mon March 17, 2014

EU Rejects Crimean Vote, Weighs Sanctions Against Russia

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 4:19 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And as Eleanor just told Renee, the government in Kiev says the world is with them, and not with Russia.

Let's bring in NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson into this conversation. She's in Berlin. She's been monitoring the European reaction to the vote in Crimea.

And, Soraya, as we mentioned, the EU, like the United States, threatening sanctions against Russia. EU foreign ministers are actually meeting today to draw some up and take a vote. What exactly are these sanctions?

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World
3:02 am
Mon March 17, 2014

Crimeans Vote To Leave Ukraine, Join Russia

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 9:59 am

Crimeans voted overwhelmingly on Sunday to leave Ukraine and join Russia. Morning Edition checks in with NPR's Gregory Warner in Simferopol and Eleanor Beardsley in Kiev for the latest.

Middle East
3:04 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

Ongoing Unrest In Venezuela Fueled By Economic Hurdles

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 4:35 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

And in Venezuela, violent clashes continue between antigovernment protesters and National Guard forces.

The country's economic troubles sparked protests in early February. People upset about high inflation, a shortage of basic items and homicide rates that are among the highest in the world. The protests have left at least 28 people dead and dozens more wounded.

Earlier, I spoke with NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, who was in the middle of one of those protests.

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Europe
3:04 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

Crimea Votes On Secession. What Happens Next?

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 4:35 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

Crimeans went to the polls today to decide whether to join Russia and secede from Ukraine. According to Crimean officials, early exit poll results show that more than 90 percent of Crimeans voted to secede.

Gregory Warner is in the Crimean capital of Simferopol, and he joins me now. Greg, where are you, and what's happening?

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Parallels
1:08 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

In Crimea, Those Who Refuse To Vote Are Making Dumplings

Ilona Simonenko, 36, posted this picture of cherry and potato dumplings to her Facebook page. Some Crimeans are expressing their dissent against Sunday's vote by making the Ukrainian treat.
Ilona Simonenko Facebook

Varenyky are Ukrainian dumplings stuffed with fruit or potatoes and topped with sour cream. Today, they became a symbol of political protest.

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Europe
11:10 am
Sun March 16, 2014

New York Ukrainians Worry About 'Evil' Happenings at Home

A woman walks past the Ukrainian National Federal Credit Union in the Ukrainian neighborhood in Manhattan's East Village. New York is home to tens of thousands of Ukrainian and Russian immigrants.
Kathy Willens AP

Yonkers, N.Y., is home to many Ukrainian immigrants and home to the Ukrainian Youth Center, which, despite its name, also has a full bar. It's where Rostyslaw Slabicky is glued to the news.

"The mood right now is extremely apprehensive," Slabicky says. "There's part that's fait accomplis, that Putin is basically doing what he wants and the entire world is basically standing by, not doing anything."

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Latin America
10:57 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Venezuela In Turmoil For Lack Of Flour, Milk And Diapers

People line up to buy goods at a store in Caracas, Venezuela.
LEO RAMIREZ AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 12:20 pm

Alvaro Villarueda starts his morning the same way every day — putting in a call to his friend who has a friend who works at a Caracas, Venezuela, supermarket.

Today, he's looking for sugar, and he's asking his friend if he knows if any shipments have arrived. As he talks on the phone, his wife Lisbeth Nello, is in the kitchen.

There are 10 mouths to feed every day in this family — five of them children. The two youngest are still in diapers.

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Attacks Over Crimea Play Out In Virtual Arena; Websites Hit

A screenshot of the Crimean referendum's website shows a report on a denial-of-service attack that made the site unavailable for several hours last night.
NPR

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 12:24 pm

Tensions have risen in Ukraine this month, as its military has confronted heavily armed, pro-Russian forces that took control of Crimea. But as of now, some of most serious attacks to be alleged are ones hitting websites on both sides of the disagreement.

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The Two-Way
9:11 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Flight 370: Investigators Seek Help, Motive For Jet's Disappearance

Relatives of Chinese passengers from the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 met officials at a Beijing hotel Sunday. The flight disappeared from radar more than a week ago.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:47 am

Malaysian officials are asking more than a dozen nations to help find the jetliner that went missing last weekend. The search area for the Boeing 777 was widely expanded Saturday; investigators are now looking for potential motives among the plane's crew and passengers to disrupt the flight.

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Middle East
8:58 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Saudi Aid Boost To Syrian Rebels Puts Jordan At Risk

Syrian refugees have flooded the Zaatari refugee camp, near the Jordanian border with Syria.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:55 am

For months, a military stalemate has defined the war in Syria. Now, a new strategy is emerging as Western allies and Gulf states step up support for rebels in southern Syria.

Along Jordan's northern border, Syrian rebels say they are unifying their fractious ranks, urged to unite by Western and Arab intelligence operatives who work in a covert command center in Jordan's capital.

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The Two-Way
7:02 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Gunmen Raid Nigerian Villages, Killing More Than 100 People

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:48 am

New violence has erupted in central Nigeria, where a dispute over grazing land has reportedly sparked a raid that officials say killed more than 100 people.

Details are still emerging about the attack, which struck several villages on Friday. The BBC says heavily armed men attacked three villages, where they looted and destroyed homes and burned their victims' bodies.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports for our Newscast unit:

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Europe
5:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Ukrainians Wary Of Putin's Designs On Their Country

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:32 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Crimeans are voting today on whether to break away from Ukraine. The Ukrainian government and the West have condemned the Russian-led referendum. Adding to tensions, on Saturday, Russian forces moved to occupy a gas depot in another Ukrainian region. In the capital city of Kiev, people see the move as further proof that Russian President Vladimir Putin's designs on their country will not end in Crimea.

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Middle East
5:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Radio Pirates Risk Dangers Of War To Reach Syrian People

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Opposition activists have found a way to get their message delivered inside Syria, where the media is otherwise state-controlled: Pirate radio. One of those radio stations is Radio Al-Kul, which means Radio for Everyone. Here's what it sounds like.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO AL-KUL)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Foreign language spoken)

MARTIN: Obai Sukar is one of the founders of Radio Al-Kul. He joins us from Istanbul, which is where he broadcasts his programs from. Welcome to the show.

OBAI SUKAR: Hi, welcome.

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Asia
5:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Tsunami's Ghosts Haunt Japanese Earthquake Survivors

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's been a little more than three years since the biggest earthquake in Japan's history, a quake that caused an unforgettable tsunami that killed some 20,000 people.

But the earthquake also had quieter consequences that didn't make headlines. In the London Review of Books, Richard Lloyd Parry investigates a peculiar phenomenon revealed in the aftermath of the storm. His piece is called "Ghosts of the Tsunami."

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The Sunday Conversation
5:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Following His Father, A Palestinian Hopes For Peace

Yousef Bashir was 11 years old when Israeli soldiers took over his home in Gaza. When he was 15, he was shot by an Israeli soldier.
Courtesy of Oneboydesign

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:32 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Yousef Bashir was 11 years old when Israeli soldiers took over his home in Gaza. His family's house was right near an Israeli settlement, and the military transformed it into a sentry post.

But Bashir's father refused to leave, out of fear he would lose his land for good. The Israelis would stay in the Bashir home for five years.

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Europe
5:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Crimeans Vote In Secession Referendum

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:32 am

Crimea votes on a referendum that would set the stage for secession from Ukraine. Correspondent Gregory Warner joins NPR's Rachel Martin to describe the atmosphere Simferopol.

Asia
5:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Search For Malaysian Jet Turns Its Focus To The Crew

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Malaysia is reaching out to dozens of countries as it expands the search for an airliner that went missing almost nine days ago. This comes after new data indicates that the plane flew for hours after it last made contact with civilian radar. But which direction it went after that point remains a mystery.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Beijing that despite evidence that the plane was intentionally diverted, Malaysian authorities have not said the plane was hijacked.

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Parallels
3:13 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Which Place Is More Sexist: The Middle East Or Latin America?

On the left: Women wearing burqas walk by the Gulf of Aqaba in Jordan in 2006. Right: Women in bikinis visit a beach in Rio de Janeiro in 2013.
Marco Di Fabio and Nelson Almeida Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 1:57 pm

A semi-naked woman in a sequined Carnival costume. A veiled woman with only her eyes showing in a niqab. Two stereotypes of two vastly different regions — Latin America and the Middle East.

On the surface, these two images couldn't be more diametrically opposed. What could the two have in common, right? What a woman wears — or what she doesn't wear, in Brazil's case — is often interpreted as a sign of her emancipation. The veil, for many, is a symbol of female oppression; the right to wear a bikini, one of liberation.

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Middle East
3:33 pm
Sat March 15, 2014

Reflecting On 3-Year Syrian War: 'There But For The Grace Of God'

Saturday is the three-year anniversary of the war in Syria. Nigel Timmins of Oxfam talks with NPR's Arun Rath about the humanitarian crisis there and the Syrian people he has met.

World
3:33 pm
Sat March 15, 2014

Ukrainians Scramble For Information Ahead Of Crimean Vote

On the eve of the referendum in Crimea, Ukrainians are reportedly nervous about what will happen after Sunday's vote. Correspondent Eleanor Beardsley talks with NPR's Arun Rath about the mood in Kiev.

Europe
3:33 pm
Sat March 15, 2014

Working Without Pay A Reality For Much Of Greece's Labor Force

Alexandra Tsitoura (left) and Nikos Aivatzidis walk through now-empty Hellenic Shipyards in Athens, Greece. Two years ago, the shipyard employed around 1,100 workers.
Holly Pickett for NPR

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 7:23 am

For nearly 30 years, Nikos Aivatzidis got up at the crack of dawn to drive from his home in central Athens to his human resources job at Hellenic Shipyards, near Greece's port of Piraeus.

"I'd walk into the entrance and marvel as I watched [6,000] or 7,000 people heading into work with me," he says. "This place was like its own city."

Now this place is deserted. Many of the roughly 1,000 workers still officially on the payroll stopped showing up after the company stopped paying them in April 2012.

But Aivatzidis holds on.

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Health
1:59 pm
Sat March 15, 2014

When Loved Ones Go Missing, Ambiguity Can Hold Grief Captive

Subramaniam Gurusamy holds a portrait of his son Puspanathan, who was onboard the missing Malaysia Airlines flight, on Friday in his home in Teluk Panglima Garang, outside Kuala Lumpur.
Manan Vatsyayana AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 15, 2014 3:33 pm

It has been more than a week since Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared, and despite a massive search effort, the whereabouts of the plane and the 239 people on board are unknown.

The airline has told the families and friends of those missing to "expect the worst."

But it's tough for families to grieve without knowing the answer to a crucial question: Could my loved one still be alive?

Dr. Pauline Boss works with people in this kind of situation. She's the author of Loss, Trauma and Resilience and a professor emeritus at the University of Minnesota.

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The Two-Way
1:02 pm
Sat March 15, 2014

Did The Malaysian Airliner Land? Here Are Possible Runways

A map shows runways that would potentially be within range of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.
WNYC

Originally published on Sat March 15, 2014 3:17 pm

The fate of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 isn't known — and officials have stated their search will now focus on a large area to the west of the plane's planned flight path from Kuala Lampur to Beijing. Experts say it isn't likely to have landed — in part because the large plane would attract notice.

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Parallels
12:54 pm
Sat March 15, 2014

What Are The Rules For Changing A Country's Borders?

A Russian flag blows outside the entrance of Crimea's parliament building in Simferopol on Thursday. Crimeans vote Sunday on whether they want to join Russia, though the international community says it will not recognize the ballot.
Filippo Monteforte AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 8:35 am

Redrawing national borders may feel like a historical relic that belongs to an earlier century, yet Crimea's crisis shows there are still places that don't fit neatly on the map — and may not for years to come.

Just last month, Crimea was part of Ukraine. On Sunday, Crimeans vote on whether they want to become part of Russia. Nevermind that the rest of the world rejects the validity of the ballot; no country appears willing or able to prevent Crimea from leaving Ukraine and joining Russia.

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Religion
11:00 am
Sat March 15, 2014

Tiny Italian Town Thumbs Its Nose At Lenten Abstinence

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 3:53 pm

On the first Sunday of Lent in Poggio Mirteto, a priest in the town's cathedral recalls the serpent in the Garden of Eden.

He admonishes parishioners in this hilltop hamlet just outside Vatican City to resist earthly delights during the time of penance and self-denial leading up to Easter.

"We must remember we are weak before evil, because the devil is very tricky," he says.

Just outside the doors, the warning goes unheeded as a parade of revelers passes.

The Freedom Festival

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The Two-Way
10:13 am
Sat March 15, 2014

Russia Vetoes U.N. Security Council Resolution On Crimea

Russia has vetoed a U.N. Security Council resolution that would invalidate Sunday's referendum in Crimea. In Moscow, demonstrators and military veterans march in support of the Kremlin Saturday; nearby, a large march was held to protest Russia's policies.
Alexander Zemlianichenko AP

Originally published on Sat March 15, 2014 3:54 pm

One day before Crimea holds a referendum on leaving Ukraine, Russia has vetoed a U.N. Security Council resolution to affirm Ukraine's sovereignty and national borders. The measure would have declared the referendum in Crimea invalid.

Russia, a permanent member of the council, was the sole vote against the resolution, which had the support of 13 countries attending Saturday's emergency meeting. China abstained from voting.

NPR's Michele Kelemen reports for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Sat March 15, 2014

Indian Court Stays Death Penalty For Two In Rape Case

Originally published on Sat March 15, 2014 3:58 pm

The hanging of two of the four men convicted for raping and murdering a woman in New Delhi in late 2012 has been stayed, according to a ruling by India's high court that was issued Saturday. The men had been found guilty of raping and attacking a woman on a bus; they've been appealing that finding.

The four men were sentenced to death in September for a crime that sparked shock, anger and intense debate over how India handles violence against women.

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The Two-Way
8:15 am
Sat March 15, 2014

Afghans Don't Need Help Securing Country, Karzai Says

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 7:45 am

Saying that more than a decade of warfare had been imposed on his country by the U.S. conflict with the Taliban, Afghan President Hamid Karzai says foreign troops aren't necessary to Afghanistan's long-term security.

"I want to say to all those foreign countries who maybe out of habit or because they want to interfere, that they should not interfere," he said, according to The Associated Press.

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Europe
6:03 am
Sat March 15, 2014

Author: Putin Has Always Been A 'Playground Bully'

Originally published on Sat March 15, 2014 9:32 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

The crisis in Ukraine has many in this country wondering what on earth Vladimir Putin is thinking. Hillary Clinton compared him to Hitler; many world leaders have called his actions insane in recent weeks. How is it that we know so much about Russia's president and yet so little? To help us with that, we've called in someone who's spent a lot of time thinking about Vladimir Putin. Masha Gessen is the author of a best-selling biography of Putin called "The Man Without a Face." Masha Gessen, thank you for joining us.

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Asia
5:45 am
Sat March 15, 2014

'Deliberate Action' Took Malaysian Airliner Off Its Route

Originally published on Sat March 15, 2014 9:32 am

Malaysia's prime minister said Saturday that the missing airline left its planned route as the result of deliberate action by someone aboard. Reporter Anthony Kuhn gives NPR's Jacki Lyden the latest.

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