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And this is The Call-In. Today we're talking about refugees. And we wanted to hear your family stories.

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A recent string of violent episodes in Southeast Asian countries sheds some light on the challenges facing this region as it grapples with extremism.

In Indonesia last month, two suicide bombers blew themselves up at a Jakarta bus station. The attack was linked to an ISIS-affiliated group.

Note: Given the subject this story explores, the discussion includes some explicit language.

Updated at 5:35 p.m. ET

An Afghan soldier opened fire on his U.S. counterparts on Saturday, killing three Americans and wounding at least one other. A spokesman for the provincial governor of Nangarhar, in eastern Afghanistan, confirmed that the incident occurred during an operation in the district of Achin, on the Pakistan border.

At one point Saturday, it looked as if Simona Halep was on her way to her first ever major victory. She'd won the first set of the French Open against her unseeded opponent, and despite fierce play from Jelena Ostapenko, few onlookers expected the unseeded Latvian to mount a comeback.

So much for that.

The Philippine military suffered its worst day yet in its fight to reclaim Marawi from ISIS-linked militants, losing 13 marines during heavy door-to-door fighting on Friday. Yet the casualties — which bring the number of military deaths there to 58 — mark just a "temporary setback," a Philippine military spokesman said.

What's Ahead In U.K. Politics

Jun 10, 2017

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One of the biggest political gambles in British history has apparently failed. British Prime Minister Theresa May has formed a new minority government after she failed to win a majority in this week's general election.

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the Six-Day War between Israel and its Arab neighbors. This is one of two stories examining how lives were changed by the war.

When Israel captured the West Bank in 1967, Omar Omar was stuck.

He was 16 years old, going to a high school in Jordan, while his parents were back home in the West Bank, a few hours' drive away.

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the Six-Day War between Israel and its Arab neighbors. This is one of two stories examining how lives were changed by the war.

Fifty years ago, Ephraim Bluth was standing in front of the bathroom mirror, shaving. And listening to the news that Israel was at war.

All we want are the facts, ma'am.

During his congressional testimony Thursday, James Comey played his best Sgt. Joe Friday, the protagonist of the 1950s Dragnet TV series known for that signature line.

Asked whether he thought President Trump obstructed justice, Comey, the fired FBI director, declined to give his opinion.

"I don't know," Comey said. "That — that's Bob Mueller's job to sort that out."

A recent report from Save the Children documents what many people have known for a long time — a baby is far better off being born in Europe than in sub-Saharan Africa.

President of Brazil Michel Temer won a crucial victory Friday in his battle to keep his job when an electoral court dismissed charges of illegal campaign financing.

The accusation stems from the 2014 presidential election won by Dilma Rousseff. Her impeachment in August 2016 elevated Temer, her running mate, to the top office, but a guilty verdict in the case decided Friday would have annulled the 2014 results entirely, reports NPR's Philip Reeves.

As Secretary of State Rex Tillerson tries to heal a deep rift among Arab partners, President Trump seems to be upping the ante. Trump says he consulted with Saudi Arabia and others on a recent trip to Riyadh and decided to call out Qatar for its "very high level" of terror financing.

Bald eagles and red-tailed hawks are not typically friends — in fact, they have been known to fight each other to the death.

That's why Canadian bird watchers were so surprised when they spotted a pair of bald eagles sharing a nest with and caring for a baby red-tailed hawk, in addition to their own three eaglets.

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And for more on politics in the U.K. we turn now to George Parker, a political editor of the Financial Times. Welcome back.

GEORGE PARKER: Hello.

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Theresa May won her own seat easily, but one of her opponents exceeded expectations. This was from the announcement of official results in May's district.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Catalonia will hold a referendum on October 1 on whether to leave Spain, the head of the region announced Friday.

"The question will be: 'Do you want Catalonia to become an independent state in the form of a republic'," said Carles Puigdemont, the head of the regional government, Reuters reports.

But the Spanish government said the vote will not happen.

Standing outside 10 Downing St. today, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May tried to put a brave face on the disastrous results of Thursday's vote.

After calling a snap election in April in anticipation of a landslide, she ended up with an electoral train wreck, in which her Conservative Party actually lost its parliamentary majority. It now holds 318 seats.

Clinging to power, May said the Tories would form a minority government with the Democratic Unionist Party of Northern Ireland, which won 10 seats.

The Saudi Arabian Football Federation issued an apology after its national team provoked outrage in Australia by not formally participating in a moment of silence for London rampage victims.

Women and men will compete together in mixed relays at the next Summer Olympics, the International Olympic Committee says, announcing a slate of changes for Tokyo 2020. The IOC says it will get close to gender balance among Olympic athletes, boosting women to nearly 49 percent, from 45.6 percent in Rio.

A group of about 30 volunteers gathers in a Paris park on a sunny afternoon for lessons in door-to-door campaigning.

They'll soon be trying out their new skills in the surrounding apartment blocks — plugging two young candidates from President Emmanuel Macron's new party, Republic On The Move.

Delphine O, 31, is one of the candidates. The half-French, half-Korean diplomat says she never imagined she'd be running for parliament.

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David Greene is on the line from Moscow. David, are people saying just the same thing there?

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NPR journalists David Gilkey and Zabihullah Tamanna died a year ago this week, ambushed on a remote road in southern Afghanistan while on a reporting assignment traveling with the Afghan National Army.

Since their deaths, NPR has been investigating what happened, and today we are sharing new information about what we learned. It's a very different story from what we originally understood.

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The investigation of Russian interference took our colleague David Greene to Moscow, and he's on the line. Who are you talking to, David?

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Britain's prime minister, Theresa May, woke up this morning and had a duty to perform. Though her party suffered disaster in yesterday's elections and lost its majority in Parliament, the Conservatives still have the most seats.

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