World News

Politics
2:34 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Senators Deny Obama Authority To Expedite Pacific Trade Deal

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 5:22 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Europe
2:34 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Nemtsov Report Alleges Russian Military Forces Fought In Ukraine

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 5:22 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
2:34 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

John Kerry Meets With President Putin In Sochi

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 5:22 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Asia
2:34 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Powerful 7.3 Magnitude Earthquake Hits Nepal

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 5:22 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Another strong earthquake shook Nepal today, adding to the devastation caused by the massive earthquake there two and a half weeks ago.

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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Malaysia Says It Will Turn Back Migrant Boats

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 3:29 pm

A regional crackdown on human trafficking in Southeast Asia could have an impact on thousands of Bangladeshi migrants and Rohingya, the ethnic group that has been the target of discrimination in Myanmar.

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The Two-Way
12:44 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Marine Corps Helicopter Helping With Relief Effort In Nepal Still Missing

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 6:36 pm

A Marine Corps helicopter helping with earthquake relief efforts in Nepal has been declared missing, but a Defense Department official said that so far there has been no indication it crashed.

U.S. Army Col. Steve Warren said an Indian helicopter nearby heard radio chatter from the Marine aircraft about a possible fuel problem. NPR's Tom Bowman says the U.S. cannot confirm the Indian account.

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Parallels
12:28 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

A Foot In Africa, A Foot In Europe: Divide Grows Wider In Ceuta

An ancient city at the mouth of the Mediterranean, Ceuta marks its 600th anniversary this year as a European territory. But changing demographics have some people wondering whether the Spanish territory in North Africa should return to local African rule. Here, rooftops in a poor Muslim neighborhood in the city.
Lauren Frayer for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 5:22 pm

Ceuta is a 7-square-mile chunk of Spain attached to Africa — a peninsula that juts out from Morocco into the turquoise Mediterranean Sea. It's one of two Spanish cities, along with Melilla, that are part of the European Union but physically part of Africa.

To get to the rest of Spain, you have to take a ferry across the Mediterranean.

On a recent trip to Ceuta, the first person I encountered gives you an idea of the type of Europeans who frequent Ceuta these days: security officials.

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Parallels
9:21 am
Tue May 12, 2015

A Report Card On Global Cooperation: Decent On Iran, Lousy In Syria

Kurdish rebels in northern Syria walk near the devastated town of Kobani last November. In a global report card on international cooperation, the failure to halt civil wars, like the one in Syria, was cited as the biggest shortcoming.
Jake Simkin AP

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 1:33 pm

The past year has been a bleak one in global affairs: The relentless carnage in Syria. Russia's annexation of Crimea. The Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

Is there anything to applaud?

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The Two-Way
8:33 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Blogger Is Hacked To Death In Bangladesh After Promoting Secular Thought

Secular activists protest the killing of Bangladeshi blogger Ananta Bijoy Das in Bangladesh on Tuesday.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 10:35 am

For the third time this year, a blogger has died after a brutal attack on a street in Bangladesh. The writer Ananta Bijoy Das was killed by men wielding machetes. He wrote for the same blog founded by Avijit Roy, a Bangladeshi-American who died in a similar attack in February.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Kerry Flies To Russia To Discuss Ukraine, Syria Conflicts With Putin

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 6:12 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:09 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Venezuela Faces Crime Epidemic

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 6:12 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
1:36 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Still Playing: The Theater That Saw The Birth Of Cinema

The world's oldest operating cinema, the Eden, in La Ciotat, southern France, screened some of the first films of the Lumiere brothers in 1895.
Anne-Christine Poujoulat AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 11:22 am

Not far from the glitzy Mediterranean film festival venue of Cannes lies another town with a connection to cinema. There are no stars or red carpet, but La Ciotat has an even longer relationship with film, and boasts the world's oldest surviving movie theater.

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Parallels
7:00 pm
Mon May 11, 2015

Brazil's World Cup Legacy Includes $550M Stadium-Turned-Parking Lot

Brazil spent billions renovating and building World Cup stadiums. Almost a year after the tournament ended, the nation is still trying to figure out what to do with them. The Mane Garrincha Stadium in Brasilia, Brazil (shown here in April 2014), was the most expensive of the stadiums — at a cost of $550 million — and is now being used as a bus parking lot.
Eraldo Peres AP

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 8:20 am

It has been almost a year since the World Cup in Brazil. The party is long over, but the country is still dealing with the hangover — in the form of "white elephant" stadiums and unfinished infrastructure projects. They come at a time when the country faces economic woes and the prospect of another expensive mega event: next year's summer Olympics.

The most expensive World Cup stadium — located in the capital, Brasilia, and with a price tag of $550 million — is being used as a parking lot for buses.

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Middle East
2:50 pm
Mon May 11, 2015

Saudi King, Several Gulf Rulers To Skip U.S. Summit

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 11:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Parallels
2:50 pm
Mon May 11, 2015

Shanghai Tower: A Crown For The City's Futuristic Skyline

The twisting Shanghai Tower (right) is the world's second-tallest building and opens soon.
Shen Zhonghai Gensler

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 8:40 am

Shanghai is one of the world's most vertical cities, a metropolis where 50-story buildings are routine. At night, the cityscape is so cinematic, it has been featured in both James Bond and Mission Impossible films.

This year, Shanghai Tower, the world's second-tallest building, will open and put an exclamation point on Shanghai's futuristic skyline. The structure, which measures 2,073 feet, is loaded with symbolism.

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Parallels
2:44 pm
Mon May 11, 2015

Saudi Women Can't Drive To Work; So They're Flocking To The Internet

Nouf al-Mazrou, with the red head scarf in the center, runs a barbeque catering business from her home in the Saudi capital Riyadh. She's shown here at a gathering of Saudi women who have launched businesses on Instagram. The event was held at a private girls school.
Deborah Amos / NPR

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 7:14 am

In a country where women are prohibited from driving themselves to work, technology is opening new avenues to the job market in Saudi Arabia.

Thousands of women use Instagram, the popular photo-sharing site, to launch businesses that sell goods and services, from cupcakes to sushi, in the desert kingdom.

At a recent convention of Instagram businesses, hundreds of women set up booths at a private girls school in the capital Riyadh to share success stories.

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Goats and Soda
12:46 pm
Mon May 11, 2015

He Couldn't Stop Painting Rocks — And Now He Has Inspired A Play

Nukain Mabuza paints his stone garden in the mid-1970s.
Rene Lion-Cachet Courtesy of JFC Clarke

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 8:05 am

Two South African artists have come together on an off-Broadway stage in New York City: One is the world-famous playwright Athol Fugard, known for his dramas critical of the cruelties of apartheid. The other is the little-known artist Nukain Mabuza, who carved out an outlet for his creative vision despite the restrictions of apartheid — and now serves as the inspiration for Fugard's latest play, The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek, opening May 11.

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Parallels
12:21 pm
Mon May 11, 2015

The First Place In East Asia To Welcome Same-Sex Marriage

Yae and Ren were married during Tokyo's Rainbow Pride Weekend in April. One Tokyo ward, or neighborhood, has recognized same-sex marriages, becoming the first place in Japan — or anywhere in East Asia — to do so.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 6:10 pm

Over Tokyo's Rainbow Pride Weekend in late April, Ren married her partner of four years, Yae, on stage before hundreds of Japanese strangers. They were proud to tie the knot and be part of a milestone in Japan and East Asia, a region where same-sex partnerships have never previously been recognized.

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The Salt
12:11 pm
Mon May 11, 2015

No One's Talking About What The Pacific Trade Deal Means For Diets

A food market in Singapore in 2012. The U.S. government says that American farmers can help "fill the void" being created by rising demand for meat in countries like Singapore through the Trans-Pacific Partnership.
Allie Caulfield/Flickr

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 5:23 pm

If you think trade deals are just about business, think again. They can also have a sweeping effect on how people eat. Take all those avocados, watermelon and cervezas from Mexico we now consume, and the meat and feed corn for livestock we send there in exchange.

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The Two-Way
11:20 am
Mon May 11, 2015

EU Proposes A Plan To Address The Mediterranean Migrant Crisis

The Italian coast guard pulls migrants from an inflatable dinghy off the Libyan coast in the Mediterranean Sea last month. European Union leaders have submitted a plan of action to save lives in the Mediterranean.
Alessandro Di Meo AP

The European Union has presented a proposal to the United Nations aiming to stem the flood of migrants from the Middle East and Africa to Europe. The plan includes seizing and destroying the boats that smugglers are using to transport the migrants across the Mediterranean Sea. The EU's foreign policy chief, Federica Mogherini, briefed the U.N. Security Council on the proposal Monday morning. "We need to count on your support to save lives," Mogherini told council members.

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The Two-Way
6:20 am
Mon May 11, 2015

Saudi King Won't Attend Camp David Summit

Saudi Arabia's King Salman attends a ceremony at the Diwan royal palace in Riyadh in April.
Yoan Valat AP

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 11:29 am

The kings of Saudi Arabia and Bahrain have dropped out of a White House summit planned at Camp David on Thursday.

NPR's Peter Kenyon reports that the kingdoms will send deputies instead. Peter filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"U.S. officials say there was no snub intended by Saudi King Salman's decision to skip the summit, which was to include a private meeting with President Obama.

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Africa
3:33 am
Mon May 11, 2015

Abuse Allegations Against French Soldiers Raise Troubling Questions

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 6:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asia
3:18 am
Mon May 11, 2015

Teen Blogger In Singapore On Trial For Sedition

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 7:51 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Next, we turn to the saga of a teenage blogger. Amos Yee is a political activist in Singapore. In March, he posted a video on YouTube celebrating the death of the founding ruler of Singapore.

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NPR Story
3:05 am
Mon May 11, 2015

Ladysmith Black Mambazo to South Africans: Stop Attacking Immigrants

Rajesh Jantilal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 3:58 pm

"United we stand, divided we shall fall."

Ladysmith Black Mambazo's latest song, with Malian singer Salif Keita, is a plea for peace in South Africa, which has been grappling with the fallout from deadly violence against immigrants from other parts of Africa.

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NPR Story
3:05 am
Mon May 11, 2015

Ebola Outbreak Is Over In Liberia, Continues In Sierra Leone, Guinea

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 6:30 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Asia
3:05 am
Mon May 11, 2015

Human Traffickers Victimize Fleeing Muslims In Myanmar

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 1:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
2:16 am
Mon May 11, 2015

South Korea's Single Moms Struggle To Remove A Social Stigma

On Sunday, about 70 marchers gathered at Seoul's City Hall Square to raise attention for South Korea's single moms. The annual event is in its fifth year.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 8:40 am

Monday marks a different kind of Mother's Day in South Korea. It's Single Mother's Day, an effort by civic groups to raise awareness of Korean society's unwed moms.

Despite Korea's rapid economic advancement, the country has yet to catch up to the notion of nontraditional families. Single moms are still forced into the shadows of society — ostracized by family members, discriminated against at work and all the while, trying to raise children without a network of support.

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Parallels
1:43 am
Mon May 11, 2015

With Small Shifts, Israel Eases Restrictions On Some Palestinians

For many commuters, standing in the parking lot after driving to work wouldn't be noteworthy. But for rheumatologist Anas Muhana, it's a big deal. He's one of only 100 Palestinian West Bank residents now permitted to drive his own car, with its white-and-green plates, to his job in Israel. The Israeli military banned Palestinian-plated cars for the past 15 years.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 9:16 am

Early one morning a couple of weeks ago, rheumatologist Anas Muhana got into his 2008 tan Mercedes jeep, turned on the ignition and drove from his home in Ramallah to his work at Al-Makassed Hospital in East Jerusalem.

It was the first time he had been allowed to do this in 15 years.

Muhana is Palestinian. His car has a green and white Palestinian license plate. And in 2000, at the start of the second intifada, Israel stopped allowing cars with Palestinian plates to cross checkpoints from the West Bank.

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World
3:18 pm
Sun May 10, 2015

Civilian Suffering Continues To Worsen In Yemen

Originally published on Sun May 10, 2015 5:08 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

And for a view from the ground in Yemen, we're turning to Teresa Sancristoval, a program manager with Doctors Without Borders. Right now, she's in the Yemeni capital, Sana'a. We reached her over Skype.

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U.S.
3:18 pm
Sun May 10, 2015

International Adoptees Create A New Sense Of Community Together

Originally published on Sun May 10, 2015 11:37 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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