World News

The Two-Way
7:42 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Japan Must Halt Whaling Program In Antarctic, Court Says

Packs of whale meat are seen in a specialty store in Tokyo last week. An international court ruled Monday that Japan must stop issuing permits to hunt whales in the Antarctic.
Shizuo Kambayashi AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:04 am

An international court has ordered Japan to revoke whaling permits in the Antarctic and stop granting new ones.

The country's government had argued that hunting whales was part of a research program, but the International Court of Justice ruled Monday that Japan hasn't generated enough scientific research to justify killing hundreds of whales. Critics said the hunts were instead a way to justify commercial hunting.

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The Two-Way
6:49 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Two Koreas Exchange Live Fire, Lob Shells Into Sea

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:32 am

"The two Koreas exchanged artillery fire across the western maritime border on Monday after the North staged a live-fire drill that sent artillery shells into southern waters and prompted the evacuation of South Korean islanders," South Korea's Yonhap News writes.

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The Two-Way
6:00 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Only 'Ocean Junk' Found So Far As Search For Jet Continues

One of the objects searchers have spotted floating in the southern Indian Ocean as they look for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Nothing they've seen so far has been connected to the missing jet.
Jason Reed AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:19 am

The state of the now 24-day-old search for a missing Malaysia Airlines plane and the 239 people on board can be summed up by these four reports:

-- "Objects sighted at sea on Sunday by an Australian Orion searching for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have been identified as fishing buoys, nets and other ocean junk." (The Sydney Morning Herald)

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The Two-Way
5:18 am
Mon March 31, 2014

U.N. Report Raises Climate Change Warning, Points To Opportunities

The U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's report.
ipcc.ch

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 8:07 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Geoff Brumfiel on the U.N. panel's report

"The effects of climate change are already occurring on all continents and across the oceans," and the world is mostly "ill-prepared" for the risks that the sweeping changes present, a new report from the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concludes.

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Europe
4:18 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Ukrainians Open Their Homes To Crimean Refugees

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 5:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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Afghanistan
3:14 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Taliban Warn Afghan Voters Not To Go To The Polls Saturday

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 5:55 am

While the candidates hold huge rallies, the Taliban have been staging suicide attacks. They've targeted election offices and civilian compounds in Kabul in an effort to derail Saturday's election.

Afghanistan
3:12 am
Mon March 31, 2014

With No Karzai On Ballot, Afghans Study Presidential Candidates

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 5:55 am

Voters in Afghanistan will elect a new president this weekend. For the first time since America went to war there, President Hamid Karzai will not be on the ballot.

NPR Story
3:05 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Researchers Detail How Climate Change Will Alter Our Lives

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 5:55 am

A United Nations panel has released a report from scientists who are getting a much better understanding of the effects of climate change.

The Two-Way
11:08 am
Sun March 30, 2014

New Photo Of Prince George Pleases The Internet

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, pose with their son, Prince George, for an official family portrait at Kensington Palace.
Jason Bell - Camera Press Getty Images

Britain's monarchy has released a new photo of Prince George, the 8-month-old son of Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge, showing a cute boy who's more taken with the family dog than with having his picture taken.

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The Two-Way
10:29 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Egypt's Presidential Election Is Set For Late May

Egypt will hold its presidential election on May 26 and 27, a government election commission announced Sunday. The results aren't likely to be declared until late June; many expect the country's former military chief to win the office.

From Cairo, NPR's Leila Fadel sent this report to our Newscast unit:

"The date was set days after Egypt's military chief Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi announced his resignation from the army and declared that he plans to run for president. The elections will begin at the end of May, and a winner will be declared by June 26.

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Europe
10:17 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Caught Between Russia And Ukraine, Border Cities Share Only Worry

Demonstrators carry a giant Russian flag through Kharkiv, Ukraine, earlier this month. The city's population is a blend of Ukranians and Russians, many of whom share families across the Russian border.
Sergey Kozlov AP

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 3:59 pm

The deployment of tens of thousands of Russian troops along their country's western border with Ukraine worries the new government in Kiev and its Western allies, including President Obama.

In a phone call Friday, he asked Russian President Vladimir Putin to pull those forces back, a demand likely to be repeated by Secretary of State John Kerry when he meets with his Russian counterpart in Paris Sunday.

But people in the Russian border city of Belgorod, one of the places where troops have been gathering, say they can't understand why the U.S. is making such a fuss.

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The Two-Way
8:19 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Angry Relatives Of Passengers On Flight 370 Demand Answers

Newly arrived Chinese relatives of passengers of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 hold banners while talking to reporters at a hotel in Malaysia Sunday. The search continues for the jetliner that went missing three weeks ago.
Aaron Favila AP

Families who lost loved ones on Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 are asking Malaysian officials to explain what happened to the jet that went missing three weeks ago. Dozens of relatives of the missing passengers arrived in Kuala Lampur from China Sunday.

Holding banners with messages like, "Hand us the murderer" and "Give us our relatives back," the family members chanted, "Tell us the truth," at a news conference held at a hotel after their arrival Sunday. Around two-thirds of the flight's passengers are Chinese. The plane had been heading to Beijing when it disappeared.

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Asia
5:40 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Air Mystery Pulled Malaysia Together, But Now Pulls It Apart

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 3:59 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

There's been an unprecedented international effort to locate the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370. Government says the aviation experts and search crews are now all working together to try to solve the mystery. But in Malaysia, where the flight originated, the jet's disappearance has fueled political criticism and ethnic tension. Many have criticized the Malay government's handling of the crisis, especially the country's large population of ethnic Chinese.

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Middle East
5:40 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Much At Stake In Pakistan Talks With Taliban

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 3:59 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Middle East
5:40 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Ruthless Warlord, Hero to Uzbeks, On Ballot In Afghan Elections

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 3:59 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Sunday Conversation
5:40 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Devastating Attack Still Leaves Afghan Journalist's Hope Alive

Bilal Sarwary is an Afghan journalist working in Afghanistan for the BBC.
Courtesy of Bilal Sarwary

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 3:59 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Bilal Sarwary is a local correspondent for the BBC in Kabul, and over a week ago, he was called to report on yet another insurgent attack that left civilians dead.

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Shots - Health News
5:40 am
Sun March 30, 2014

After Ending Polio, India Turns To Stop Another Childhood Killer

A boy waits to get vaccinated at an anti-polio campaign in Moradabad, India.
Michaeleen Doucleff NPR

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 10:20 am

The world just took one step closer to eradicating its second disease.

On Thursday, health officials declared India — and the entire Southeast Asia region — free of polio. And India's success against paralyzing disease is already opening doors for the massive country to stop even bigger problems.

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Movie Interviews
3:10 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Cambodia's 'Missing Pictures' Molded From Director's Own Life

In The Missing Picture, director Rithy Panh uses clay figurines to recall his experience of the genocide in Cambodia at the hands of the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s.
Strand Releasing

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 3:59 pm

The genocide in Cambodia in the 1970s at the hands of the Khmer Rouge has inspired many books and movies, most famously the 1984 Oscar-winner The Killing Fields. But the most unusual might be this year's Oscar-nominated film The Missing Picture. In it, filmmaker Rithy Panh uses clay figurines to recall his experience of genocide.

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Parallels
3:09 am
Sun March 30, 2014

A Few More Thoughts On Sexism In Latin America

Demonstrators rally to protest sexism in Brasilia, Brazil, last June. A new protest erupted last week after a study released by Brazil's Institute for Applied Economic Research reported 65 percent of Brazilians believe women who dress provocatively deserve to be attacked.
Eraldo Peres AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:31 am

Editor's Note: NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, who has worked extensively in the Latin America and the Middle East, recently compared the sexism she found in both places. You can read her original essay here. It sparked a strong response from readers, and we asked her to address a number of those issues.

A man throws acid on a woman's face. A mother is killed because her partner believes she slept with another man.

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The Protojournalist
5:13 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Vladimir Putin Is Right Out Of A Russian Novel

Russian President Vladimir Putin stands in the shadow of the Fyodor Dostoyevsky monument in Dresden, Germany, 2006.
SEBASTIAN WILLNOW AFP/Getty Images

"Russia is a hypothetical culture. Ruled by despots for most of our history, we are used to living in fiction rather than reality," writes Nina L. Khrushcheva, who teaches international affairs at The New School. She is also the great granddaughter of the late communist leader of the Soviet Union, Nikita Khrushchev.

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U.S.
3:02 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Separated By Deportation, Family Plans To Reunite In Mexico

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 4:59 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. Arun Rath is away. I'm Kelly McEvers.

This month, the U.S. is projected to hit two million deportations since President Obama took office. That number has sparked protests by pro-immigration reform activists across the country. Next week, Obama will meet with the Hispanic caucus in Congress, but expectations are low now that comprehensive immigration reform is stalled in the House.

Jasmine Mendoza's family is one of the millions that's been separated by deportation.

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Russia Says It Doesn't Plan To Invade Ukraine

Senior high school students wearing Soviet-era navy uniform march during a daily ceremony of changing the guard of honor at the WW II Memorial to the Heroes of the defense of Sevastopol 1941-1942 in Sevastopol, Crimea, Saturday. Russia says it doesn't plant to invade mainland Ukraine.
Olga Maltseva AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 10:32 am

The Russian troops who are holding Crimea won't be sent into Ukraine, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov says. "We have absolutely no intention of — or interest in — crossing Ukraine's borders," Lavrov told a Russian TV station Saturday, according to a translation by Reuters.

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The Two-Way
7:37 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Taliban Attack On Election HQ Makes Good On Campaign Promise

Afghan special forces rush to the scene as Taliban militants attack the main Afghan election commission's headquarters on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan on Saturday.
Anja Niedringhaus AP

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 8:10 am

As officials from Afghanistan's Independent Election Commission were about to announce the closing of several polling stations due to insecurity on Saturday, the Taliban reinforced the message by launching an attack on the IEC headquarters in Kabul.

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Middle East
5:59 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Egypt's Death Penalties Set New Standard Of Severity

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:27 am

This week an Egyptian court sentenced over 500 people to death. NPR's Leila Fadel tells NPR's Scott Simon that it was one of the harshest verdicts ever imposed in modern Egypt.

Religion
5:59 am
Sat March 29, 2014

The Pope And Obama Share A Knack For Inspiring The Young

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:27 am

President Obama met with Pope Francis this week at the Vatican. Among those watching most closely were young American Catholics.

Middle East
5:59 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Obama Holds Talks With King Abdullah In Saudi Arabia

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:27 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. And President Obama is on his way home on Air Force One after a quick trip to Saudi Arabia. The president met with Saudi Arabia's aging monarch, King Abdullah. Last night and today he met with the Saudi woman who won a U.S. State Department Women of Courage Award. We're going to turn now to Ellen Knickmeyer, a reporter for the Wall Street Journal. She's in Riyad. Thanks so much for being with us.

ELLEN KNICKMEYER: Yeah. It's my pleasure, Scott.

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Europe
5:59 am
Sat March 29, 2014

McCain: Sanctions Are Not Enough Against Putin

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:27 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. President Vladimir Putin of Russia made a surprising phone call to President Obama last night about the situation in Ukraine. Meanwhile though, thousands of Russian troops amass along the Ukrainian border. President Obama suggested in an interview with CBS that Russia might have what he ominously called additional plans. Today, Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov said again that Russia has no intention of sending its armed forces into Ukraine.

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Asia
5:59 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Survivors Of Malaysia Airlines Flight Ask, What Next?

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:27 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. While the families of the passengers of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 wait for news from search crews, there are many questions about what happens next. What kind of compensation can they expect? Can they sue the airline, Boeing, or both? Do they have to wait for the black boxes to be recovered before any proceedings can begin and what if those boxes are never found?

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Parallels
3:37 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Made In China — But Was It Made In A Prison?

Products produced by prison labor in China are on display at the Laogai Museum in Washington, D.C.
Shujie Leng NPR

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 8:14 am

An Oregon woman was looking at her Halloween decoration last year when she found a letter written by an inmate from one of China's re-education-through-labor camps. The letter spoke of brutal forced labor in the camp.

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Parallels
3:36 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Dans Le Train, French Spend Their Commute Learning English

David Potier, head of commercial relations with France's state rail company, promotes the English classes and Canadian Afton Piercy is one of the teachers.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 9:18 am

On some French trains, the conductor's whistle signals more than just a departure. For commuters traveling on an express train from Reims to Paris — a 90-mile, 45-minute ride — it means the beginning of English class.

"Before the course, we were sleeping in the train in the morning," says passenger-student Gilles Hallais. "So I prefer practicing English."

Hallais, 44, is a journalist at French public radio. He says while he doesn't need English for his work, he does need it for his life. "I think it could be a handicap if I don't speak fluent English."

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