World News

Africa
4:07 am
Thu December 19, 2013

U.S. Diplomat Tours Central African Republic

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 10:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The American ambassador to the United Nations is visiting Central African Republic today. Before becoming a diplomat, Samantha Power was a journalist who wrote about stopping genocide. And now she is visiting a country where there's fear of one. Fighting between Muslims and Christians has killed nearly 1,000 people. NPR's Michele Kelemen is traveling with Ambassador Power. She's on the line. Hi, Michele.

MICHELE KELEMEN, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: Where are you now, and what have you seen?

Read more
Middle East
3:02 am
Thu December 19, 2013

11,420 Children Dead In Syria's Civil War, So Far

Children carry the body of a friend who was killed by shelling during heavy fighting between the Free Syrian Army and the forces of Syrian President Bashar Assad in Damascus earlier this year.
Momahed Dimashkia Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 11:51 am

Read more
Europe
2:53 am
Thu December 19, 2013

Russian Parliament Approves Amnesty Bill

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 10:08 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more
Parallels
1:06 am
Thu December 19, 2013

Brazil's Post Offices Help Deliver Christmas Wishes

Volunteers look through children's letters to Santa at a post office in Salvador in northeastern Brazil's Bahia state. The campaign is part of a more than 20-year tradition to help those less fortunate to have gifts for the holiday.
Raul Spinasse DPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 6:47 pm

"Dear Father Christmas," the letter reads, "my name is Larissa. I know that you are very busy and that you live a long way away in the North Pole, but I'd like to ask you for a gift because my mother doesn't have enough money to buy what I want."

There are piles of similar letters — many decorated with stickers, drawings and hand prints — lying on makeshift tables in the main hall of the post office in downtown Sao Paulo.

Read more
World
3:46 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Obama, Biden Won't Go To 2014 Olympics, But Gay Athletes Will

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 4:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Read more
Remembrances
3:46 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

The Great Train Robber, Ronnie Biggs, Dead At 84

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 4:34 pm

Melissa Block talks with Paul Crompton, executive producer at Barge Pole Productions, about train robber Ronnie Biggs, who died Wednesday at 84. Crompton made the film The Great Train Robber's Secret Tapes with former Daily Express reporter Colin MacKenzie, who tracked the robber to Rio after he escaped from prison, and recorded his interviews with him over a period of days.

Europe
3:46 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Once-Great English Port Hopes Wind Power Will Mean A Better Future

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 12:32 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

This week we're dipping our toes into the waters around the British Isles. We're exploring a few of the places behind the names listed in what's known as the Shipping Forecast. It's basically a report of sea and weather conditions around the isles, broadcast several times a day on BBC Radio.

Read more
Middle East
3:46 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Fighting Escalates In Syria Ahead Of Peace Conference

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 4:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Activists in Syria say the most intense bombardment of that country's civil war is now in its fourth day. Government aircraft are dumping barrels packed with explosives on the city of Aleppo. Close to 200 people have been killed in the assault so far, according to the group Doctors Without Borders.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:46 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

HIV Treatment Keeps A Family Together And Growing In Kenya

When Benta Odeny was diagnosed with HIV, she started to protect her husband Daniel from the virus by taking antiretroviral medications. The same drugs also helped her give birth to an HIV-negative daughter, Angelia.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 3:17 pm

Daniel and Benta Odeny married late by African standards: Both were in their 30s. And they'd only just hit their third anniversary when Benta started coughing blood.

The cough lasted a couple of weeks. So Benta went to the doctor. She had HIV. But Daniel was still HIV negative.

"She thought it was the end of the world," Daniel says.

Benta thought that Daniel would leave her and she would die alone. She had seen it happen many times to other women in her situation.

Read more
Africa
2:16 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

U.S. Envoy: Time For Intervention In Central African Republic

Soldiers from Burundi arrive at the airport in Bangui, capital of the Central African Republic, on Dec. 15 to join the African Union and French efforts to restore security in the troubled nation.
Sia Kambou AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 5:57 pm

The Obama administration's ambassador to the U.N. says this is a pivotal moment for the Central African Republic and time for the international community to take steps to prevent further atrocities there.

Samantha Power, a former journalist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, is well-known as an advocate for humanitarian intervention. How she and the Obama administration handle the conflict in the CAR is a major test of that.

Read more
It's All Politics
2:14 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Obama's Jab At Russia In Keeping With Olympic Tradition

Team USA celebrates its 4-3 victory over the Soviet Union in the semifinal Men's Ice Hockey event at the Winter Olympic Games in Lake Placid, N.Y., on Feb. 22, 1980. The game was dubbed "the Miracle on Ice."
Steve Powell Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 4:40 pm

When it comes to the Olympics, politics intrudes more often than not.

President Obama has decided not to attend the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, in February. The official U.S. delegation will not include a president, vice president, first lady or former president for the first time since 2000.

Instead, Obama asked athletes including openly gay tennis great Billie Jean King and two-time hockey medalist Caitlin Cahow to represent the country. American gay-rights groups, angered by an anti-gay law Russia enacted in June, applauded the move.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:04 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Kerry Says He Regrets Treatment Of Indian Diplomat In New York

Indian workers in New Delhi remove a barricade Tuesday that had been erected outside the main entrance of the U.S Embassy as a safety measure.
Saurabh Das AP

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 2:56 pm

Secretary of State John Kerry has telephoned a top official in New Delhi to express regret for the strip-search of an Indian diplomat after her arrest last week in New York on charges of visa fraud.

"As a father of two daughters about the same age as [Indian diplomat] Devyani Khobragade, the Secretary empathizes with the sensitivities we are hearing from India about the events that unfolded after Ms. Khobragade's arrest," State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said in a written statement, relating Kerry's conversation.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Beijing: Near Miss As U.S. Warship 'Harassed' Chinese Vessel

Chinese state media has said the incident involved its newly deployed aircraft carrier, Liaoning, shown here in October 2012.
AP

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 12:34 pm

China has confirmed that one of its warships — reportedly the newly deployed aircraft carrier Liaoning — had an "encounter" with a U.S. guided missile cruiser in the South China Sea earlier this month.

Read more
Parallels
11:43 am
Wed December 18, 2013

What It Costs To Fill Your Belly In New Delhi

New Delhi's colorful street markets are still the most economical places to shop. But prices for staples such as the lowly onion have soared in the past year.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 3:28 pm

Just how far does a dollar go? We'll try to answer that question as part of an occasional series on what things cost around the world. In this installment, NPR's Julie McCarthy takes us on a gastronomic tour of New Delhi and tells us what you can buy for $5, $20 and $100.

With over a billion people, India's $1.7 trillion economy is as varied as its culture. But if you still think of it as a land of endless bargains, then you'd better think again.

Read more
U.S.
6:04 am
Wed December 18, 2013

Diplomat's Arrest In N.Y. Sparks Anger In India

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 7:53 am

Financial Times New Delhi correspondent Amy Kazmin speaks with NPR's Linda Wertheimer about the case of an Indian diplomat arrested in New York for allegedly paying her maid below minimum wage. The diplomat was strip-searched and jailed, touching off an angry reaction in India.

Europe
3:37 am
Wed December 18, 2013

Protesters In Ukraine Agitated By Economic Deal With Russia

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 6:02 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Yesterday, Ukraine got a big holiday present from its neighbor, Russia, in the form of a multi-billion dollar bailout. And now everyone is trying to figure out what strings Russia attached, and whether this could be a sign that Ukraine, a country of some 45 million people, is aligning itself more closely with the East than the West.

Read more
Africa
3:37 am
Wed December 18, 2013

Factional Fighting Flares In South Sudan

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 6:02 am

Two years ago, South Sudan split from its northern neighbor Sudan. Linda Wertheimer talks to reporter Andrew Green in Juba about the fighting in South Sudan.

20 Years Of NAFTA
3:28 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

What Has NAFTA Meant For Workers? That Debate's Still Raging

An auto worker tightens bolts on a Focus at a Ford plant in Michigan in October. Labor unions predicted in 1993 that NAFTA would send many U.S. manufacturing jobs to Mexico, and they continue to argue that the pact prompted a race to the bottom for workers.
Mira Oberman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:31 pm

Two decades ago, the strongest critics of the North American Free Trade Agreement were members of labor unions. They warned that the trade deal would mean the loss of manufacturing jobs to Mexico and lower wages for U.S. workers.

Today, 20 years since NAFTA's passage, unions feel as strongly as ever that the deal was a bad idea.

Read more
Europe
2:43 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Russia Agrees To Financial Massive Bail-Out For Ukraine

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:31 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

Russia has agreed to a multibillion-dollar bailout for Ukraine. The deal comes amid a political crisis in Ukraine, as tens of thousands of demonstrators keep up a weeks-long protest. They're demanding the country's president step down. As NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Moscow, the bailout may buy some breathing room for President Viktor Yanukovych, but it triggered new outrage among his opposition.

Read more
Europe
2:43 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

A Storm-Lashed British Isle Famous For Church Bells, Populated By Few

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 7:17 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

We're going to venture out onto the sea now off the coast of Britain. Yesterday, we heard about a British cultural institution called the Shipping Forecast. Every night, landlubbers who know nothing of the sea tune into BBC radio, to hear about sea and weather conditions off the British Isles. Songs and poems have been devoted to the forecast.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:43 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

How The U.S. Helped Fight The Global AIDS Epidemic

A mother waits with her child at an HIV clinic in Nyagasambu, Rwanda, in February 2008. The clinic was built with a grant from the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief initiative.
Shashank Bengali MCT /Landov

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 6:50 am

A decade ago, President George W. Bush announced an unprecedented global health initiative: $15 billion over five years to fight HIV in developing countries.

"There are whole countries in Africa where more than one-third of the adult population carries the infection," Bush said in his 2003 State of the Union address. "Yet across that continent, only 50,000 AIDS victims — only 50,000 — are receiving the medicine they need."

Read more
Sports
2:43 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Some Competitors Say Free-Diving Needs A Safety Sea Change

Nicholas Mevoli smiles while diving in Curacao in October. He died a month later following an attempted dive in a free-diving competition in the Bahamas.
Daan Verhoeven Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:31 pm

Dahab, Egypt, just north of Sharm el-Sheikh on the Sinai Peninsula, is perfect for free-diving. A diver can have tea in a simple beach cafe and then take just a handful of steps into the Gulf of Aqaba, where the seafloor plunges more than 100 yards into a wine-glass-shaped blue hole.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:36 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Russia Throws Ukraine Financial Lifeline Amid Popular Unrest

Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) listens to Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych in the Grand Kremlin Palace in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday.
Yuri Kochetkov EPA /Landov

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 4:05 am

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports that Russia has agreed to a massive bailout package for Ukraine, a deal that could keep the country from bankruptcy next year – but the deal has outraged the political opposition which has protested closer ties with Moscow.

As we reported on Monday, the deal is aimed at keeping the cash-strapped former Soviet republic in the Russian sphere of influence.

Flintoff reports:

Read more
World
12:45 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Romanian Project Reunites Abandoned Children With Families

Ionuts was a ward of the state until the Vaslui program reunited him with his mother, Mioara, and the rest of his family.
Meghan Collins Sullivan NPR

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 5:07 pm

Mioara stands on her doorstep in rural Romania, an infant clinging tightly to her neck and a toddler attached to each leg.

The 36-year-old Roma woman is the mother of eight. Her two oldest children are blind and attend a free boarding school in Iasi, on the border with Moldova. Mioara — whose last name has been withheld out of concern for her children — is eligible to collect a small amount of money from the government to help with the three youngest kids, who won't leave her side.

Read more
Parallels
10:14 am
Tue December 17, 2013

Israeli Startup Offers Kids Social Media Training Wheels

Many children want to participate in social media sites like Facebook before they're old enough to legally sign up.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun December 22, 2013 7:14 am

Two years ago, Itay Eshet's daughter told him she wanted a Facebook account. She was 10 years old.

Facebook's great, Eshet told her, but it's not for kids. So instead they built a new social network for preteens called Nipagesh, which means "let's meet" in Hebrew.

Read more
The Salt
9:49 am
Tue December 17, 2013

Industrial Meat Bad, Small Farm Good? It's Not So Simple

Somali refugees lead their herds of goats home for the night outside Dadaab, Kenya. A new study shows that animals in many parts of the developing world require more food — and generate more greenhouse emissions — than animals in wealthy countries.
Rebecca Blackwell AP

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:53 am

To feed all 7 billion of us, address climate change and live longer, we all need to eat less meat. From Al Gore to the Meatless Monday movement to Harvard epidemiologists, that's been the resounding advice offered to consumers lately.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:27 am
Tue December 17, 2013

India-U.S. Row Over Diplomat's Arrest In New York Escalates

Indian workers remove Tuesday a barricade that had been erected as a safety measure outside the main entrance of U.S. Embassy in New Delhi. The move follows the arrest of an Indian diplomat in New York.
Saurabh Das AP

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 6:03 am

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET

At issue is the arrest last week of Devyani Khobragade, India's deputy consul general in New York.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:10 am
Tue December 17, 2013

Edward Snowden Seeks 'Permanent Political Asylum'

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 11:24 am

Updated at 11:04 a.m.

Edward Snowden says "permanent political asylum" will give him the freedom to talk about U.S. surveillance programs.

Read more
Space
2:58 am
Tue December 17, 2013

Moon Landing Is A Major Step Forward For China

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:30 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This weekend, China landed a probe on the surface of the moon. This is the first soft-landing on the moon's surface in nearly 40 years, and it's a major step forward for China's space program.

Joining us to discuss these developments, NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel. Hey, Geoff.

GEOFF BRUMFIEL, BYLINE: Hi, there.

GREENE: So what did China actually pull off here?

Read more
Religion
2:34 am
Tue December 17, 2013

Archbishop Kurtz: Pope Francis Is 'Engaged' With People

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:30 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Time Magazine's Person of the Year is 77 today. Pope Francis continues to fascinate the world with his common touch and now with his thoughts on economics. In two recent church documents, the Pope discussed the wealth gap and the limitations of capitalism. After some American critics said that sounded Marxist, the Pope told the Italian newspaper La Stampa that while he considers Marxist ideology wrong, he has met many Marxists who are good people and he's not offended by being compared with them.

Read more

Pages