World News

Parallels
2:31 am
Thu March 20, 2014

At The Border, The Drugs Go North And The Cash Goes South

Many drug cartel members die young, and when they do, their families often spend lavishly to construct mausoleums that look like small condos.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 9:07 am

The international drug trade goes in two directions: Narcotics go north and money goes south. All the drug profits made on the streets of U.S. cities like Chicago and Atlanta and Dallas are funneled down to ports of entry on the U.S.-Mexico border where they're smuggled back into Mexico. In 2012, one federal agency alone, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, seized $411 million in cash hidden in vehicles, mostly heading south.

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Asia
2:31 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Objects Spotted In Indian Ocean Possibly Linked To Missing Jet

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:37 am

Australian officials say they are searching the Indian Ocean southwest of Perth after satellite images found objects that are possibly connected to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

Asia
2:31 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Satellite Images Show Potential Debris From Flight 370

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:37 am

Host David Greene gets the latest from NPR's Frank Langfitt about the potential debris from Malaysia Flight 370 spotted by satellite imagery in the southern Indian Ocean.

Europe
2:31 am
Thu March 20, 2014

For Crimea, Split From Ukraine Would Be Complicated And Costly

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:37 am

Crimea is a poor region, heavily subsidized by Kiev, and gets all its gas, water and food from Ukraine. Russia doesn't even have a land link with the Crimean peninsula and absorbing it will affect banks, schools, tourism and pensions for residents.

The Two-Way
9:55 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Australia: Objects Spotted By Satellite Imagery May Be Linked To Jet

Amid speculation and confusion about the missing Malaysia Airlines flight, Kuala Lumpur International Airport has a message board for the passengers and crew.
Vincent Thian AP

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:48 am

Australian satellite images found objects that are possibly connected to the Malaysia Airlines flight that went missing with 239 people on board March 8. "New and credible information has come to light in relation to the search," Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott told his Parliament on Thursday.

"The Australian Maritime Safety Authority has received information based on satellite imagery of objects possibly related to the search," Abbott said. "Following specialist analysis of this satellite imagery, two possible objects related to the search have been identified."

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Why Ukraine's Situation Makes Russia's Other Neighbors Nervous

A column of Russian troops prepares to leave the checkpoint at a bridge over the Inguri River in Western Georgia, in October 2008, after securing the secession of Georgia's breakaway South Ossetia region.
Levan Gabechava Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 8:42 am

When Vladimir Putin announced the Kremlin's annexation of Crimea this week, he made it clear that the region's large Russian-speaking population made the move necessary and inevitable.

In fact, large populations of Russian speakers are common along the fringes of the old Soviet Union. Those groups are made up of a combination of indigenous people and Russians who migrated from the mother country, many as part of Soviet-era policies aimed at altering the ethnic makeup in potentially troublesome satellites.

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Sports
2:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Far From Home, South Sudanese Basketballer Finds Footing On Court

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:59 pm

In three years, Mooseheart High School's basketball team went from also-ran to champion. One of the reasons? Mangisto Deng, a 6-foot-7-inch player from South Sudan. He tells of his journey and team.

Parallels
2:27 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Western Sanctions On Russia Are 'A Shot Across The Bow'

Russian President Vladimir Putin looks on as Crimean leaders sign a treaty for Crimea to join Russia on Tuesday. In response, Western countries have imposed limited sanctions.
Sergei Ilnitsky AP

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:59 pm

Russian officials were quick to mock the limited economic sanctions on Moscow announced by the U.S. and Europe this week. In response to Russia's annexation of Crimea, Western leaders have frozen the assets of a handful of government officials and also barred them from getting visas to travel to the West.

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Technology
2:27 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

U.S. Pulls Out Of ICANN — What Does That Spell For Internet Users?

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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News
2:27 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Russian Flags Fly Over Ukrainian Base — But Who Stormed It?

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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Shots - Health News
2:27 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

To Save Her Husband's Life, A Woman Fights For Access To TB Drugs

Oxana and Pavel Rucsineanu fell in love while living at a tuberculosis ward in Balti, Moldova.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:13 pm

One year ago Pavel Rucsineanu was running out of options.

Drug-resistant tuberculosis was ravaging his lungs. And the disease had evolved into an incurable form, doctors said.

It's like an "infectious cancer," Dr. Tetru Alexandriuc said at the time. "We have no other medicines" to treat Pavel, the doctor added. Although he wouldn't say it, the doctor expected TB would kill Pavel.

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News
2:27 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

As Iran Talks Wrap Up, Diplomats Get Specific

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Europe
2:27 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Tumult In Crimea Has Some Fearing A Cold War Redux

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:59 pm

Russia's annexation of Crimea has troubled its relations with the U.S. As Russia and the U.S. begin to trade sanctions in retaliation, analysts wonder if this spells a renewal of Cold War rivalry.

Politics
2:27 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Even Amid Tensions, Russia's PR Team Is At Home In D.C.

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Even as the United States and Europe ratchet up pressure on Russia, the Russian Federation has a lobbying team here in Washington. That might seem odd but it's not unusual, as NPR's Peter Overby reports.

PETER OVERBY, BYLINE: There's no mistaking how the United States feels toward the Russian Federation. Today, White House spokesman Jay Carney said the administration strongly condemns Russia's use of force in Crimea.

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News
2:27 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

In Airliner Search, Countries Still Wonder What Parts To Play

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:59 pm

FBI investigators are now joining the hunt for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. It's one more instance of increasingly closer international cooperation in the search — though confusion persists.

Intelligence Squared U.S.
12:05 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Debate: It May Be Flexing Its Muscles, But Is Russia A Marginal Power?

Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.
  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

In the past year, Russia has been a decisive player in several events on the international stage — often to the chagrin of the Obama administration. It gave asylum to former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, blocked United Nations efforts to impose sanctions against the Syrian government and sent troops into Ukraine.

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Parallels
6:56 am
Wed March 19, 2014

'Saint Death' Now Revered On Both Sides Of U.S.-Mexico Frontier

Claudia Rosales kneels in front of her home altar devoted to Santa Muerte, or Saint Death. Rosales put up a statue of the saint in the city that was taken down by the mayor of Matamoros.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 3:40 pm

The intrepid tourist who visits the market in the border city of Matamoros will find her between the onyx chess sets and Yucateca hammocks. She looks like a statue of the Grim Reaper dressed in a flowing gown. She is Santa Muerte, or Saint Death.

Originally revered as an underground folk saint in Mexico, her popularity has jumped the Rio Grande and spread to Mexican communities throughout the United States.

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Parallels
5:42 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Borderland: A Journey Along The Changing Frontier

Dob Cunningham (right) and his friend Larry Johnson stand on the edge of Cunningham's 800-acre ranch in Quemado, Texas, which touches the Rio Grande. On the other side, Mexico.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 3:42 pm

My colleagues and I drove 2,428 miles and remained in the same place.

We gathered a team, rented a car, checked the batteries in our recorders and cameras. We moved from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean. We crossed deserts, plains and mountains. But all the while, we were living in Borderland — zigzagging across the frontier between Mexico and the United States.

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Europe
3:01 am
Wed March 19, 2014

For Small Norwegian Town, Here Comes The Sun

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK, I don't mean to sound off-color, but there really is a place where the sun don't shine - at least for six straight months. Rjukan, Norway sits in a deep valley that runs east to west. It's walled in by mountains 2,500 feet high that block the sun for half the year.

Reporter Jeffrey Kofman tells us how people in town try to bring a little light back into their lives.

(LAUGHTER)

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World
3:01 am
Wed March 19, 2014

NGO Helps Illuminate Opaque World Of Global Finance

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When diplomacy fails, governments can turn to sanctions. That's what the U.S. did this week, issuing sanctions against Russian officials. It charges with, quote, contributing to the crisis in Ukraine.

But one thing that prevents sanctions from working is how easy it is for people to hide their assets. They can use shell companies, which have an anonymous owners, or they can use companies hidden in other company - much like Russian nesting dolls.

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World
3:01 am
Wed March 19, 2014

As Russia Annexes Crimea, Ukraine Seeks Peaceful End To Crisis

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Russia may have taken Crimea out of Ukraine, but it hasn't quite taken Ukraine out of Crimea. For one thing, there are still Ukrainian troops there and Russia wants them gone.

GREENE: Today Russian backed forces stormed Ukraine's naval headquarters in Ukrain's main Black Sea port. And apparently without a shot being fired, the Russian flag is now flying there.

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World
3:01 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Anger And Shock In Kiev Over Russia's Land Grab

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, Russia's actions are being celebrated in Crimea. Many people there are excited about the idea of joining Russia. The emotion is much more downtrodden in the capital, Kiev, where there's a feeling of loss setting in.

And here's Eleanor Beardsley is there.

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Asia
3:01 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Could Malaysian Military Have Prevented Jet's Disappearance?

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

More mystery in the story of that missing jetliner. Malaysian officials say files from a flight simulator owned by the captain of the plane were deleted last month. They're trying to retrieve them. Investigators are examining the pilot's simulator to see if it provides any clues about the fate of the jet.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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It's All Politics
4:47 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Obama's Foreign Policy: More Second-Term Misses Than Hits

Russian President Vladimir Putin's actions are beyond President Obama's control, something that holds true for most of the foreign policy issues vexing the U.S. president's second term.
Sergei Ilnitsky AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 5:43 pm

Second-term presidents who find their ability to shape domestic affairs limited by congressional constraints often view foreign policy as the arena in which they can post some successes.

Ronald Reagan had his second-term breakthrough with Mikhail Gorbachev, the Soviet Union's general secretary. Bill Clinton had the U.S. lead its NATO allies into taking military action against the Serbian government of Slobodan Milosevic. Much further back in time, Woodrow Wilson successfully negotiated the League of Nations Treaty (though he couldn't win Senate passage for it).

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Shots - Health News
4:32 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Flu Drugs Saved Lives During 2009 Pandemic

Part of Nebraska's 2009 stockpile of the anti-viral medicine, Tamiflu.
William Wiley AP

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 11:12 am

Drugs used to treat the flu really did save the lives of seriously ill people during the influenza pandemic of 2009-2010, a study in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine suggests.

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Europe
2:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

The View From Russia: Crimea's Long-Awaited Return

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Well, now for a pro-Russian take on recent events, we turn once again to political scientist Andranik Migranyan. He's director of the Institute for Democracy and Cooperation. That's a Russian-funded think tank in New York. Welcome back to the program.

ANDRANIK MIGRANYAN: Oh, thank you for having me.

SIEGEL: When we spoke just over three weeks ago, you raised the subject of Crimea. So first question: Is Crimea unique among regions of Ukraine? Or could you see what happened there happening elsewhere in that country?

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Europe
2:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Will Scotland Leave The UK? One Cafe Sells Cakes to Find Out

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Here's a referendum that would overturn centuries of history. Scotland is deciding whether to leave the United Kingdom. The U.K. is home to more than 60 million people. Scotland holds just about five million of those. They'll vote on independence in September.

NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from Glasgow on the campaign.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: On a bland street near Glasgow's central train station, the Riverhill Coffee Bar announces itself with a vibrant blue facade. It's a teeny sliver of a place.

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Europe
2:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Ukrainian Ambassador: Today, Nobody In Europe Feels Secure

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Olexander Motsyk is Ukraine's ambassador to the United States and joins us by phone now. Welcome to the program, Mr. Ambassador.

UKRAINE AMBASSADOR OLEXANDER MOTSYK: Thank you.

SIEGEL: I want to ask you first, there are Ukrainian troops in Crimea. Will they remain there?

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News
2:03 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Russia Votes To Annex Crimea, As The West Looks On

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Russia's President Vladimir Putin moved today to overturn recent history by reclaiming Crimea for Russia. Putin signed a treaty to annex Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula and gave a rousing speech to parliament laying out his case. He is also blasted the West for trying to frighten him with sanctions.

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U.S.
2:03 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

In Unprecedented International Search, American Navy Lends A Hand

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The search for the missing plane has expanded to a vast area, stretching from Kazakhstan in Central Asia to the southern ends of the vast Indian Ocean. For the latest on those efforts, we're joined now by Commander William Marks who is spokesperson for the U.S. 7th Fleet, the Navy's biggest fleet. Commander Marks, welcome.

COMMANDER WILLIAM MARKS: Thank you for having me. Appreciate it.

SIEGEL: And can you tell us where you are and what the U.S. Navy is doing in this search?

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