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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Nobody wants to be attacked by a chigger. These six-legged mite larva — so small they're invisible to the naked eye — have a powerful bite that causes severe itching. They also transmit a disease called scrub typhus, named for the forest undergrowth, or scrub, that is home to the chiggers.

What leads some people to say no — rather than yes — to vaccines? A survey of nearly 66,000 people about attitudes toward immunization has found some surprising results. In France, 41 percent of those surveyed said they did not have confidence in the safety of vaccines. By contrast, in Bangladesh, fewer than one percent of those surveyed expressed a lack of confidence.

After marathon takes, and with caveats and reservations, the U.S. and Russia announced a plan for a truce and military coordination in Syria — and it's easy to find reasons it could fail.

As Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov acknowledged, the agreement sits on a foundation of profound mistrust and comes after a similar effort, introduced in February, gradually fell apart.

At a news conference in Geneva late Friday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced the beginnings of a peace plan for Syria, reports NPR's Alice Fordham.

Kerry was joined in the cease-fire announcement by Sergey Lavrov, Russia's foreign minister.

"The United States is going the extra mile here because we believe that Russia, and my colleague, have the capability to press the [Bashar] Assad regime to stop this conflict and come to the table and make peace," Kerry said.

The deal will be implemented at sundown on Monday, Lavrov said.

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Donald Trump's praise of Russian President Vladimir Putin is again stirring up controversy after he gave an interview Thursday to state-funded Russian Television.

Trump talked to former CNN host Larry King, who now hosts a show on RT America, for about 10 minutes. The Republican candidate again cast doubt on whether Russia was behind the hacking of the Democratic National Committee, a belief at odds with U.S. intelligence officials.

That's also despite having encouraged Russia to "find" Clinton's emails just six weeks ago.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

To Norwegian author Tom Egeland, it was one of the most significant war photos ever taken.

To Facebook, it was a "display of nudity."

The social media site's removal of the image sparked an uproar — and, on Friday, the company announced it was reversing course and would be reinstating the image.

China was rattled physically and politically Friday by North Korea's nuclear test, its second this year and fifth overall. It caused a magnitude 5.3 seismic event that caused strong tremors in towns and cities on the border between the two countries, according to the Chinese media.

But as with previous tests, it's unlikely to provoke a strong Chinese response.

On Thursday night, a series of cable cars traveling over the Mont Blanc Alpine Massif stopped working — leaving more than 100 tourists stranded, NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports.

Helicopter crews managed to extract 65 of the trapped people in a delicate rescue operation. But by the time night fell the helicopters had to stop, leaving dozens more people, including a 10-year-old child, dangling in the gondolas overnight.

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Updated 11:15 a.m. ET

North Korea confirmed it has conducted its fifth test of a nuclear weapon, the second this year. The test occurred Friday morning local time and triggered a magnitude 5.3 seismic event.

The North's state TV said the test "examined and confirmed" the design of a nuclear warhead intended for placement on a ballistic missile. It said there was no leakage of radioactivity. China's Ministry of Environmental Protection said radiation levels in its border region with North Korea were normal.

Alarmed Russians are sharing photos on social media of a Siberian river that has suddenly and mysteriously turned blood red.

Russian authorities are trying to determine the cause of the ominous change to the Daldykan River, located above the Arctic Circle and flowing through the mining town of Norilsk. Photos posted on Facebook by the Association of the Indigenous Peoples of the Taimir Peninsula clearly show the river has turned a vivid red.

Dozens of massive container ships are stranded at sea, looking for a place to dock after one of the world's largest shipping companies went bankrupt. Lars Jensen, the CEO of Sea Intelligence Consulting, which focuses on container shipping, says the container ships are operated by the South Korean-owned Hanjin Shipping company.

"It is some 85 to 90 vessels, and they really are scattered all over the world," he says.

A couple of months ago I was at Washington, D.C.'s Union Market, where dozens of food vendors sell their wares, when I spotted the word falooda at one of the small stalls. Falooda is a cold, textured dessert or snack that was a regular part of my childhood summers back in India. And this was the first time in America that I had seen a mention of this beloved dessert. I was thrilled and promptly joined the line to order some.

Rage Against The Busted Medical Machines

Sep 8, 2016

"Oh, we have a hematology analyzer but it stopped working," the lab technician said as he pointed to a covered tabletop medical equipment in the corner used to measure blood count levels — an important but simple tool for a community where anemia and infections are prevalent.

Air China has apologized for a story in its in-flight magazine that told would-be visitors to London that "precautions are needed when entering areas mainly populated by Indians, Pakistanis and black people."

China's flagship airline has removed copies of the magazine, Wings of China, from its planes, The Associated Press reports. The airline tells the AP it has instructed the magazine's publishers to "strengthen their content review and avoid making similar mistakes."

For many of us, Sept. 11, 2001, is one of those touchstone dates — we remember exactly where we were when we heard that the planes hit the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. I was in Afghanistan.

I'd arrived in Kabul on Sept. 9 to cover the trial of eight foreign aid workers who had been arrested by the Taliban regime, which accused them of preaching Christianity to Afghans. Proselytizing was a death penalty crime, and two Americans were among the accused.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

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