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Argentina's navy has announced that it is no longer looking for survivors on the submarine that disappeared more than two weeks ago but will continue to search for the missing ARA San Juan.

Pope Francis met with a group of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh on Friday, offering them blessings and hearing their stories — and specifically mentioning the Muslim minority by name, something he avoided doing during his visit to Myanmar, where Rohingya have faced persecution.

"The presence of God today is also called 'Rohingya,' " the pope said, at the end of an interfaith meeting that was held in the garden of the archbishop's residence in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Since President Trump came into office, U.S. troop numbers have been edging up in the three countries where the U.S. is most deeply involved in fighting — Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan.

U.S. forces totaled just over 18,000 in these three countries at the end of last December, just before President Obama completed his term, according to the Pentagon's Defense Manpower Data Center.

The combined figure was about 26,000 as of the end of September, the most recent data available from the Pentagon.

Editor's Note: This story was originally published on December 1 and has been updated.

World AIDS Day was December 1. The White House hung a red ribbon. Hundreds of red balloons were released in the air in Brazil. And Prince Harry and Meghan Markle made their first appearance as a royal couple at an AIDS charity event in Nottingham, U.K.

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A Teddy Bear Reunion

Dec 1, 2017

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It happened in the span of a few confused minutes.

Moments after hearing that his 20-year sentence for war crimes had been upheld, Slobodan Praljak defied the admonitions of his judges, declared his innocence a final time — and with eyes wide, as if shocked himself at what he was doing, put a tiny glass to his lips and gulped deeply. "I just drank poison," he exclaimed after lowering the glass. And the presiding judge asked for the curtains to be closed.

The Afghan girls robotics team has taken home a top prize at Robotex, Europe's largest robotics festival.

The team previously made headlines because their visas were temporarily denied in the run-up to a robotics contest in the U.S. — but they always wanted to be recognized for their work, not for the politics over their travel. Ultimately, they were allowed into the U.S, placed 114th overall (higher than the teams from the U.S. and U.K.) and received a medal for "courageous achievement."

British politicians are loudly condemning President Trump's retweets yesterday of incendiary anti-Muslim videos posted by a leader of the far-right Britain First party.

The intercontinental ballistic missile that North Korea launched on Wednesday appears to be significantly larger and more powerful than previous versions, according to independent analysts.

Two former naval officers were among 29 people given life sentences Wednesday in Argentina for their involvement in human rights abuses carried out during the country's "Dirty War," a brutal period of military dictatorship from 1976-1983.

Former Capts. Alfredo Astiz, known as the "Angel of Death," and Jorge Eduardo Acosta, aka "The Tiger," were given life sentences in the largest and longest trial of its kind in Argentina's history. It opened in 2012 and focused on crimes against 789 victims at the Naval Mechanics School, or ESMA, which was turned into a secret torture center.

The U.S.-led military coalition has marked a string of successes in its fight against ISIS, including the liberation of Raqqa, Syria, and Mosul, Iraq. But the force says that its artillery and airstrikes have killed at least 801 civilians in those countries since Operation Inherent Resolve began in 2014.

Well, it looks like women have been balancing a full-time job and motherhood for thousands of years. All the while, they haven't gotten much credit for it.

By studying the bones of ancient women in Europe, archaeologists at the University of Cambridge have uncovered a hidden history of women's manual labor, from the early days of farming about 7,500 years ago up until about 2,000 years ago.

When you think of Polynesia, what images first come to mind?

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Pope Francis visited Bangladesh today. And in a meeting with dignitaries, he called for them to care for the plight of refugees.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

POPE FRANCIS: (Speaking Italian).

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Ivanka Trump was welcomed as American royalty in India this week at a global mashup of innovators and entrepreneurs.

She led the U.S. delegation to the 8th annual Global Entrepreneurship Summit, which wrapped up Thursday in the city of Hyderabad, a vibrant IT hub.

Polished and splendidly attired, Trump packed a cavernous auditorium in the city that's emerging as a center of innovation.

"The greatest treasure is you," Trump declared in her keynote address, "the dreamers, innovators, entrepreneurs who never give up."

A showdown in Honduras appears imminent between incumbent President Juan Orlando Hernandez and his TV star rival Salvador Nasralla, who are neck-and-neck in an ongoing vote count from Sunday's presidential election.

Both claimed victory in the weekend poll and with 83 percent of the votes counted, they were separated by just one-tenth of one percent — Hernandez had 42.11 percent to Nasralla's 42.21 percent.

Initially, Nasralla enjoyed a five percentage point lead over Hernandez, but as that lead quickly evaporated, international concern over a disputed outcome grew.

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

A 19th century painting by Polish artist Robert Sliwinski that was stolen by the Nazis during World War II was returned to its home country and presented to the public on Wednesday.

After a tip from Poland's Ministry of Culture and National Heritage, FBI agents recovered the painting in a town near Philadelphia, FBI spokeswoman Carrie Adamowski of the Philadelphia Field Office told NPR.

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Fake birth control pills. Cough syrup for children that contained a powerful opioid. Antimalarial pills that were actually just made of potato and cornstarch.

These are, according to the World Health Organization, just a few examples of poor-quality or fake medicines identified in recent years.

Like many industrial cities in Germany, Salzgitter, in the northern state of Lower Saxony, has seen better days.

The sprawling municipality's largest employer, Volkswagen, has been hurt by the diesel emissions cheating scandal and international pressure to cut emissions with electric cars — which in turn has cut into Salzgitter's income from taxes and jobs.

North Korea says a new intercontinental ballistic missile tested on Wednesday proves it has a nuclear deterrent that can reach any target in the United States.

According to a statement from the Korean Central News Agency, the ICBM is capable of carrying a "super-large heavy warhead, which is capable of striking the whole mainland of the U.S."

These days, Charles Watmon shares his bed — a few sheets of thin, white foam on the concrete floor of his thatched-roof hut — with his dog.

It's not much. But to Watmon, 44, and his caramel-colored mutt, it's more than enough for a good night's sleep — and a welcome change from his past.

During the course of nearly a decade, Watmon fought on both sides of Uganda's brutal civil wars — first with the rebel group known as the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), then with the government.

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Updated at 12 p.m. ET

Slobodan Praljak died Wednesday, just hours after the convicted war criminal interrupted a courtroom hearing to declare his innocence — and then drank a small container of what he said was poison, according to Croatian state media.

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