World News

Europe
6:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Colosseum Gets A Good 2,000-Year Scouring

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 4:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For two millennia, the Colosseum in Rome has been collecting layers of dirt and grime. Finally, it's getting a top-to-bottom scrubbing. The Roman monument was, of course, the center of entertainment back in the day where people could go to catch a really good show, like a gladiator fight, mock naval battle, or public execution. Millions of tourists visit the amphitheater these days, but it's filthy, covered in black gunk from car pollution, damaged by earthquakes, and stripped of materials over the centuries.

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Afghanistan
6:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Ancient Form Of Poetry Captures Afghan Women's Lives

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 4:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Eliza Griswold has reported from Afghanistan for more than a decade, writing news features for the New York Times magazine and other publications. She thought she had a pretty good grip on the country's politics and culture, but it wasn't until she started exploring Afghan women's poetry that she discovered a different side of women's lives there. What she found was a complex world of rage, empowerment, sorrow and sex.

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The Two-Way
8:24 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

S. Korea Prime Minister Offers Resignation Over Ferry Sinking

South Korean Prime Minister Chung Hong-won also apologized to a country increasingly angry over the handling of the sinking and for lax regulatory enforcement that authorities say contributed to the accident.
Ahn Young-joon AP

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:06 am

South Korea's prime minister says he will resign over the ferry disaster that left more than 300 people dead or missing — and left the victims' families in anguish for days, as fruitless rescue attempts were made.

Chung Hong-won also apologized to a country increasingly angry over the handling of the sinking and for lax regulatory enforcement that authorities say contributed to the accident.

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Around the Nation
3:19 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

Fear For Sherpas' Future Grows With Each Climbing Tragedy

Relatives carry a casket bearing the body of a Mount Everest avalanche victim for cremation in Kathmandu on Monday.
Prakash Mathema AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 7:42 am

Sherpas have a great reputation as the world's best climbers. "Sherpa" is not some sort of honorific or title; it's the name of an ethnic group — a tiny one. There are around 150,000 of them in Nepal.

While they fight for their lives on treacherous mountain terrain, Sherpas also struggle to keep their community — and its values — alive.

If you are a Sherpa, it's noted right in your name, like Ang Galgen Sherpa, who lives in Queens, N.Y., home to the largest community of Sherpas in the U.S.

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The New And The Next
3:19 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

A New Vision For Online Dating: A Profile In Pictures

DreamTheEnd Youtube

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 4:25 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

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The Two-Way
10:35 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Afghan Election Heads Toward Runoff; Women Cast 36 Percent Of Votes

Afghan women shop in Kabul Saturday. Women cast more than a third of the ballots — 36 percent — in Afghanistan's presidential election, officials said. The race will likely head to a runoff next month.
Wakil Koshar AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 1:28 pm

With 44.9 percent of the ballots in his favor, Afghanistan's former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah leads the candidates vying for the presidency, according to new preliminary results. He will likely face former finance minister Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai in a runoff, officials say. Ahmadzai captured 31.5 percent of the votes from the April 5 election.

The preliminary results were announced Saturday by the Independent Election Commission; the results will be made final in May, after an inquiry into fraud complaints is complete.

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Europe
9:22 am
Sat April 26, 2014

What Russia Might Gain From A Decentralized Ukraine

Ukrainian soldiers watch a helicopter fly overhead outside the eastern town of Kramatorsk. Under Moscow's proposal for Ukraine's constitution, the east and other regions would be strongly autonomous.
Evgeniy Maloletka AP

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 9:30 am

Ukraine's interim government is facing major obstacles: a separatist uprising in the east of the country, an economy in tatters and a presidential election next month.

But the leadership is also facing a longer-term challenge, one that will shape the future of the country: the creation of a new constitution.

The task will be complicated by pressure from Russia, which has already made clear what kind of constitution it thinks Ukraine should have. Russia's foreign minister, Sergei Lavrov, laid out Russia's position in an interview last month.

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The Salt
7:50 am
Sat April 26, 2014

African Food With A Twist: Dakar Pop-Up Restaurant Raises The Bar

Magida Safaoui, right, and an assistant plate tomatoes at a Trio Toques event in April. Safaoui helps out the three chefs who run the restaurant.
Doreen Akiyo Yomoah for NPR

West Africa hasn't competed with the likes of Paris or Barcelona as a culinary destination, but a handful of food lovers there are making inroads to change that.

Visitors to Ghana can now sample the work of mixologists who specialize in liquors made with local ingredients. In Bamako, Mali, vinophiles can head to the annual Beaujolais Nouveau wine festival. And in Dakar, Senegal, there's Trio Toque.

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The Two-Way
6:37 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Ukraine: International Observers Arrested, More Sanctions Approved

Masked pro-Russian activists guard a barricade outside the regional state building seized by separatists in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk Saturday. Pro-Russian forces holding a group of international observers have accused them of being "NATO spies."
Alexander Khudoteply AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 9:58 am

The leaders of the world's largest economies are poised to punish Russia over its role in Ukraine's crisis with a new round of sanctions the Group of Seven approved Friday. The same day, a team of European monitors was arrested in eastern Ukraine by pro-Russian separatists.

The G7 leaders say the sanctions are a response to Moscow's lack of action on pledges made during recent talks in Geneva that were meant to calm the tense situation in Ukraine.

From Brussels, Teri Schultz reports for NPR's Newscast unit:

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Parallels
5:51 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Two Very Different Popes Will Be Canonized

Pope John Paul II at Giants Stadium in New Jersey in 1995. John Paul, the pontiff from 1978-2005, was a favorite among traditionalist. He will be canonized on Sunday along with the late Pope John XXIII, he was popular among liberals.
David Ake AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 9:30 am

Pope Francis will canonize two 20th-century Catholic giants on Sunday — one a pope beloved by traditionalists the other a pontiff who was the icon of Catholic liberals.

The Polish-born John Paul II was the first non-Italian pope in nearly 500 years. He traveled to every corner of the earth and helped bring down communism.

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Middle East
5:51 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Egypt's Activists Battle Anti-Protest Law — And Protest Fatigue

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Two presidents of Egypt have been ousted after often violent street demonstrations since the Arab Spring, but a law passed in November now bans any protest that is not sanctioned by the Egyptian government as part of the broad crackdown on the dissent there, and thousands have been arrested. Many remain in jail.

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Middle East
5:51 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Syrian Composer-Turned-Activist Asks Americans For Support

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

As the conflict in Syria rages, a pianist named Malek Jandali has turned to composing to express his sorrow. He was one of the first Syrian artists living abroad to openly criticize the Assad regime, not long after an uprising swept across his homeland. Jessica Jones from North Carolina Public Radio shares how he found his voice through music.

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Middle East
5:51 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Obama: May Be Time For A Pause In Mideast Peace Talks

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The Obama administration's recent efforts to try to steer Israel and Palestine into - and the Palestinians into a lasting peace accord have failed. President Obama isn't giving up, but as he acknowledges, it may be time for a pause. He says Israelis and Palestinians have both taken unhelpful steps in recent weeks and neither side looks ready to compromise. This is a major setback for Secretary of State John Kerry, as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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Sports
5:51 am
Sat April 26, 2014

What Makes Americans Buy British Soccer Clubs?

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

So if you're a fan of the beautiful game - that's soccer for those of you who aren't - you've no doubt heard that this week Manchester United sacked - that's fired, not putting a man in a sack, though it's close - David Moyes, its manager. Man U had fallen badly behind its Premier League rivals, most notably Liverpool, which is in a position to win its first league championship in almost 25 years.

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The Salt
3:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Rum Renaissance Revives The Spirit's Rough Reputation

Ian Burrell, a rum ambassador from the U.K., samples the liquor at the Miami Rum Festival.
Tatu Kaarlas Courtesy of Miami Rum Festival

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 9:31 am

There was a time when rum was considered rotgut. Blackbeard the pirate liked to mix his cane alcohol with gunpowder and light it — rum and croak.

Fast-forward a few centuries to rum respectability — specifically, to Rob Burr's patio deck in Coral Gables, in South Florida.

From the waterfall pond to the tiki bar, Burr's deck sets a mood not for swilling rum, but for tasting it. Not the way spring-breakers chug Captain Morgan, but the way cognac drinkers sip Napoleon: Not with Coke (or gunpowder) but neat, in a snifter.

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Latin America
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

A Postcard From Rio, Where World Cup Readiness Remains Uncertain

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Soccer fans are counting down. Forty-seven days to go until the World Cup in Brazil. The country is in the news again but not for the reasons it might want. In one of the key host cities, Rio de Janeiro, riots broke out in a major tourist area earlier this week. Big questions over the readiness of stadiums and infrastructure also remain. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is our South America correspondent, and she's with us today in our D.C. studios. Lourdes, nice to have you here.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, BYLINE: It's great to be here.

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Business
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

After Everest Tragedy, Who Pays When Climbing Season's Suspended?

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The short climbing season on Mount Everest ended suddenly and sadly. The avalanche that killed 16 guides last Friday has shaken the Sherpa community and many have left the mountain. As a result, most expedition companies have cancelled their climbs. NPR's Julie McCarthy has more from Kathmandu on the next chapter, who pays when the season is suspended?

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News
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Obama Offers Support And Condolences In Somber South Korea

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. In South Korea today, President Obama consoled a nation in mourning over the victims of a ferry disaster. He also assured South Koreans that the U.S. is committed to support and defend the country in the face of North Korea's threats to test yet another nuclear device. NPR's Anthony Kuhn has been following the president in Seoul and joins us to talk about the trip.

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Commentary
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Week In Politics: Middle East Peace Talks And Ukraine Offensive

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Joining us now, political columnists David Brooks of the New York Times and E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution. Hello to both of you.

DAVID BROOKS: Hello.

E.J. DIONNE: Good to be with you.

SIEGEL: And first, briefly since you both talked about Ukraine here just last Friday, does some kind of soft landing seem possible to you there and does President Obama's leadership strike you as effective in leading the Western response to Russia? David, you first.

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Europe
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Heated Words On Air Often Don't Match Events On Ground In Ukraine

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The government in Kiev accused the Kremlin today of trying to start another world war. This comes as a team of unarmed military observers in Ukraine is said to have been detained by pro-Moscow militants. The group is made up of representatives from several European countries. They've been monitoring growing tensions in eastern Ukraine.

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Shots - Health News
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Family Tree Of Pertussis Traced, Could Lead To Better Vaccine

False-color transmission electron micrograph of a field of whooping cough bacteria, Bordetella pertussis.
A. Barry Dowsett Science Source

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 5:51 am

Whooping cough was once one of the leading killers of babies around the world. Now that it's largely controlled with a vaccine, scientists have had a chance to figure out how the disease came into being in the first place.

That story is told in a study published online this week in the journal mBio. And it turns out that whooping cough arose quite late in human history.

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The Two-Way
1:32 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Company Hopes To Strike It Rich By Mining Pacific Seafloor

Shrimp surround a volcanic vent nearly 4,000 feet beneath the Pacific Ocean, south of Samoa. Some mining companies are interested in the rich sulfide deposits surrounding vents such as these.
NSF/NOAA AP

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 7:41 am

A Canadian company has signed a contract to open the first deep-sea mineral mine off the coast of Papua New Guinea, realizing a decades-long ambition to tap the seafloor's vast resources.

Nautilus Minerals is hoping to extract copper, gold and silver at a depth of about 5,000 feet as part of the mining project, known as Solwara 1.

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Barbershop
10:24 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Cliven Bundy, #myNYPD: Public Relations Fails?

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 10:59 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. It's time yet again for our weekly visit to the Barbershop. That's where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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Race
10:24 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Is Anti-Semitism In Ukraine A Real Threat?

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 10:59 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Now to Ukraine where tensions remain high. Today, the Ukrainian prime minister reportedly accused Russia of trying to start World War III.

In the midst of all this political chaos, there are also concerns that anti-Semitism is taking root in Ukraine. It's a serious enough matter that Vice President Joe Biden addressed it when he visited Ukraine this week. Take a listen.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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The Two-Way
6:18 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Fresh Avalanches On Everest Appear To End Climbs In Nepal

A Nepalese government delegation met with Sherpa mountain guides near Mount Everest's base camp on the south side of the mountain Thursday. The government was hoping to persuade the guides to continue working even though 16 Sherpas had died a week earlier. But fresh ice avalanches on Friday appear to have doomed Nepal's climbing season.
Adrian Ballinger/Alpenglow Expeditions AP

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 9:24 am

High up on the Nepalese side of Mount Everest, fresh ice avalanches on Friday made it "almost certain that no one will summit the world's highest mountain from Nepal during this year's climbing season," Reuters writes.

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The Two-Way
5:30 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Russia Wants To Start World War III, Ukrainian Leader Charges

On guard: a Ukrainian soldier at a roadblock near Slovyansk, in eastern Ukraine.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:52 pm

The crisis in Ukraine showed no signs of cooling Friday. Harsh rhetoric was flying:

-- "Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseny Yatseniuk accused Russia on Friday of wanting to start World War III by occupying Ukraine 'militarily and politically,' " Reuters reports.

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Middle East
3:33 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Israel Suspends Peace Talks After Palestinians Reach Unity Deal

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 6:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's talk about a busy week of news in the Middle East. Israel has now broken off peace talks with the Palestinians. These talks were already in a stalemate. This latest decision comes in response to internal Palestinian politics. This week two major Palestinian factions, Fatah and Hamas, agreed to end a seven-year split and form a coalition government. Hamas is considered a terrorist organization by Israel, as well as the United States and the European Union.

For more we turn to NPR's Emily Harris in Jerusalem. Emily, good morning.

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Middle East
3:30 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Syria Is On Track To Meet Chemical Weapons Deadline

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 6:09 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This is about as close as we're going to get to good news out of Syria. The country is on track, we're told, to meet a deadline to give up its chemical weapons arsenal. The most dangerous chemicals in Syria's declared stockpile are supposed to be removed by Sunday, yet Syria now faces suspicion that it's using less toxic chemicals, possibly chlorine. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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Around the Nation
3:23 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Chicago Doctor Among Those Killed In Afghan Hospital Attack

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 6:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

In Afghanistan yesterday, a security guard open fire at a hospital. He killed three American doctors including a pediatrician from Chicago. Dr. Jerry Umanos was a religious man who traveled often to Afghanistan to train younger doctors. He wanted to make sure people everywhere had good access to medical care.

NPR's Cheryl Corley reports.

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Asia
3:07 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Pakistani Journalists Live Dangerously If They Cross The Line

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 12:23 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A man came by our studios this week who cannot go home. He is known by the name Raza Rumi. He's a writer and television host in Pakistan - or at least he was until gunmen opened fire on his car. And now he's staying outside Washington, D.C.

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