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When describing the cultural history of the Caribbean island of Grenada, it's the cooking pot rather than the melting pot that springs to mind. And there's no better culinary metaphor than "oil down," the peculiarly named national dish of Grenada, a mix of meats and vegetables.

Nearly every ingredient in this hearty stew has a unique origin and story to tell: For instance, callaloo, a leafy vegetable somewhat similar in taste to spinach, and the same plant's root, known as dasheen, are indigenous to the Caribbean and were cultivated by Grenada's earliest Amerindian inhabitants.

Eid al-Adha, an important Muslim holiday, starts on Monday in many countries. The Festival of Sacrifice, which marks Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son, Isaac, involves days of feasting and celebration. But the holiday has health officials in some countries — Afghanistan, in particular — wringing their hands about health risks. It's the feasts that are the problem — specifically, the meat.

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New Syria Ceasefire Set To Begin Monday

Sep 10, 2016
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

A fire erupted at a packaging factory in Bangladesh early Saturday, killing at least 21 people.

Dozens more were injured in the blaze in the industrial area of Tongi, located about 8 miles north of the capital Dhaka. While The Associated Press reports 21 people have died, The Dhaka Tribune put the death toll as high as 24, saying that firefighters also fear that 10 to 15 others may still be trapped inside the burning factory.

'Tough Guy' Farmers Stand Up To Italian Mafia — And Win

Sep 10, 2016

Imagine a tough guy who stands up to organized crime, and you probably think of a steely cop or a crusading prosecutor. But in the Calabria region of southern Italy, the tough guys who have neutralized the local mafia are not the sort you would expect.

Daniele Pacicca rides a tractor through his olive grove outside the town of Stilo, where he makes organic olive oil. His 1,200 trees are his livelihood. One morning this summer, he was shocked to find 13 of them had been hacked to the ground.

Gary Johnson, the Libertarian candidate for president, was chagrined and embarrassed this week after he asked, "What is Aleppo?" in reply to a question on MSNBC. Mr. Johnson made no excuses and said later he simply "blanked" — his word — when asked what he would do about the besieged Syrian city in which hundreds of thousands of civilians are trapped, many starving and defenseless against artillery, bombs and alleged chemical weapons.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Nobody wants to be attacked by a chigger. These six-legged mite larva — so small they're invisible to the naked eye — have a powerful bite that causes severe itching. They also transmit a disease called scrub typhus, named for the forest undergrowth, or scrub, that is home to the chiggers.

What leads some people to say no — rather than yes — to vaccines? A survey of nearly 66,000 people about attitudes toward immunization has found some surprising results. In France, 41 percent of those surveyed said they did not have confidence in the safety of vaccines. By contrast, in Bangladesh, fewer than one percent of those surveyed expressed a lack of confidence.

After marathon takes, and with caveats and reservations, the U.S. and Russia announced a plan for a truce and military coordination in Syria — and it's easy to find reasons it could fail.

As Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov acknowledged, the agreement sits on a foundation of profound mistrust and comes after a similar effort, introduced in February, gradually fell apart.

At a news conference in Geneva late Friday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced the beginnings of a peace plan for Syria, reports NPR's Alice Fordham.

Kerry was joined in the cease-fire announcement by Sergey Lavrov, Russia's foreign minister.

"The United States is going the extra mile here because we believe that Russia, and my colleague, have the capability to press the [Bashar] Assad regime to stop this conflict and come to the table and make peace," Kerry said.

The deal will be implemented at sundown on Monday, Lavrov said.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump's praise of Russian President Vladimir Putin is again stirring up controversy after he gave an interview Thursday to state-funded Russian Television.

Trump talked to former CNN host Larry King, who now hosts a show on RT America, for about 10 minutes. The Republican candidate again cast doubt on whether Russia was behind the hacking of the Democratic National Committee, a belief at odds with U.S. intelligence officials.

That's also despite having encouraged Russia to "find" Clinton's emails just six weeks ago.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

To Norwegian author Tom Egeland, it was one of the most significant war photos ever taken.

To Facebook, it was a "display of nudity."

The social media site's removal of the image sparked an uproar — and, on Friday, the company announced it was reversing course and would be reinstating the image.

China was rattled physically and politically Friday by North Korea's nuclear test, its second this year and fifth overall. It caused a magnitude 5.3 seismic event that caused strong tremors in towns and cities on the border between the two countries, according to the Chinese media.

But as with previous tests, it's unlikely to provoke a strong Chinese response.

On Thursday night, a series of cable cars traveling over the Mont Blanc Alpine Massif stopped working — leaving more than 100 tourists stranded, NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports.

Helicopter crews managed to extract 65 of the trapped people in a delicate rescue operation. But by the time night fell the helicopters had to stop, leaving dozens more people, including a 10-year-old child, dangling in the gondolas overnight.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Updated 11:15 a.m. ET

North Korea confirmed it has conducted its fifth test of a nuclear weapon, the second this year. The test occurred Friday morning local time and triggered a magnitude 5.3 seismic event.

The North's state TV said the test "examined and confirmed" the design of a nuclear warhead intended for placement on a ballistic missile. It said there was no leakage of radioactivity. China's Ministry of Environmental Protection said radiation levels in its border region with North Korea were normal.

Alarmed Russians are sharing photos on social media of a Siberian river that has suddenly and mysteriously turned blood red.

Russian authorities are trying to determine the cause of the ominous change to the Daldykan River, located above the Arctic Circle and flowing through the mining town of Norilsk. Photos posted on Facebook by the Association of the Indigenous Peoples of the Taimir Peninsula clearly show the river has turned a vivid red.

Dozens of massive container ships are stranded at sea, looking for a place to dock after one of the world's largest shipping companies went bankrupt. Lars Jensen, the CEO of Sea Intelligence Consulting, which focuses on container shipping, says the container ships are operated by the South Korean-owned Hanjin Shipping company.

"It is some 85 to 90 vessels, and they really are scattered all over the world," he says.

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