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Taliban militants attacked the Afghan Parliament in Kabul on Monday.

NPR's Philip Reeves reports that police say all of the militants were killed by Afghan security forces and more than a dozen civilians were injured. Philip filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Every morning at 5, Eric Kempson rises, grabs a pair of binoculars and drives to a windy peak overlooking a rocky beach near his home on the Greek island of Lesvos, known for its beaches and ouzo and as the birthplace of the lyric poet, Sappho.

You know it's springtime in Germany when eager shoppers ransack the produce aisle of the local supermarket.

In April, it's the rhubarb, in May, it's the peaches and in June, it's the cherries. These fruits only put in a brief appearance while they are in season; the rest of the year, you have to rely on their canned or frozen equivalent.

European leaders hold an emergency summit in Brussels on Monday in an effort to prevent Greece from defaulting on its debts. Greece owes the International Monetary Fund $1.8 billion by the end of this month, and it needs Europe's help to make the payment. But the Athens government is refusing to commit to an economic overhaul package that officials are demanding.

Greece has come close to default many times before — only to work out a last-minute compromise with its creditors. This time, though, it faces much longer odds.

Reports of the Russian military helping pro-Russian separatist fighters in Ukraine are common — but can be hard to confirm. Russia denies that its soldiers are fighting in Ukraine.

Islamic State militants have sown landmines around ancient ruins in the Syrian city of Palmyra, captured by the Islamist group in May, according to a British-based monitoring group.

It wasn't clear, however, whether the move is a prelude to destroying the Roman-era sites or securing them from Syrian government forces, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says.

Recycling sewage water has helped free Israel, a desert country, from depending on rain.

Treated sewage water provides close to a quarter of Israel's demand for water, right behind desalination, the other major process that has eased Israel's fear of drought.

But making that water — from toilets, showers, and factories — clean enough to use is challenging.

We have heard about how ISIS is recruiting foreign fighters to join its ranks. But it's happening on the other side as well.

Just last week, a Massachusetts man who died fighting against ISIS in Syria was laid to rest.

Last year, a British man who calls himself Macer Gifford left his job as a financial trader in London and went to join the Kurds and fight the self-declared Islamic State in Syria.

Gifford spoke on the condition that NPR not reveal his real name, because he fears for the safety of his family in the UK.

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You don't expect to see world leaders getting down on all fours to perform yoga in public, let alone in a mass yoga class that draws observers from Guinness World Records.

But India's Narendra Modi did just that when he launched International Yoga Day on Rajpath, the central Delhi mall that represents the nerve center of power in India.

"Who would have thought that we would turn Rajpath into Yog-path [Yoga Road]," Modi asked the assembled yoga enthusiasts.

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A far-right Dutch politician said cartoons of the prophet Muhammad were not shown on Dutch TV today as planned because of a "misunderstanding" with the network, but said the broadcast would go ahead at a later date.

Geert Wilders heads the Freedom Party and was a speaker at the Muhammad cartoon event in Garland, Texas, last month that was attacked by gunmen. He initially accused the television station of sabotage when Saturday's broadcast didn't go off as planned. It was supposed to be aired during a block of time allotted by law to every party in the Dutch parliament.

Tens of thousands of anti-austerity demonstrators marched through the streets of London and other U.K. cities in what they claim is the start of a broader program of protests and civil disobedience to force the Conservative government to reverse its program of deep spending cuts.

Larry Miller, reporting from London for NPR, says that organizers have promised their campaign will continue "until austerity is history."

A Greek minister is hinting that Athens will bring a new plan to the table at an emergency European Union summit next week to keep the country from defaulting on its sovereign debt and exiting the Eurozone.

"We will try to supplement our proposal so that we get closer to a solution," State Minister Alekos Flabouraris told Greek Mega television in a morning news show, according to Reuters. "We are not going there with the old proposal. Some work is being done to see where we can converge, so that we achieve a mutually beneficial solution."

Tens of thousands of people have been gathering in the Belgian countryside over the last week to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the battle of Waterloo. The bloody battle of June 18, 1815, marked the final defeat for Napoleon at the hands of a coalition of his enemies. The re-enactment is attracting history buffs, tourists and wannabe soldiers.

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

Four months after Osama bin Laden was killed in a U.S. raid in Pakistan, one of the al-Qaida leader's sons requested a death certificate for his father in a letter to the U.S. embassy in Saudi Arabia, according to documents released by Wikileaks.

It was not immediately known how Wikileaks obtained the documents, nor whether they are authentic.

Updated at 9:25 a.m. ET

Officials in South Korea say they've had no new cases of MERS for 16 days, but also reported the 25th death from the deadly disease. Thailand, which discovered the first case of the deadly disease earlier this week, says 175 people were exposed to its single case, with no new infections reported so far.

Construction workers clamp scaffolding onto the historic facade of Colmado Quilez, an old-fashioned general store selling wine and cheese in downtown Barcelona.

One hundred years ago, customers rolled up here in horse-drawn carts. Now BMWs park on the Rambla de Catalunya, which has become one of Barcelona's poshest avenues.

So posh, in fact, that this family business can no longer afford to stay.

Hopes Fade As Yemen Peace Talks Falter

Jun 20, 2015
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From time to time, NPR's Ina Jaffe joins us for a conversation we call 1 in 5 because one-fifth of the U.S. population will be 65 years or older in just 15 years. Ina joins us now from the studios of NPR West. Ina, thanks for being with us.

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How The Kurds Are Succeeding In Iraq

Jun 20, 2015
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It's Father's Day! While the holiday isn't formally celebrated in the rural area of southern India where I live, I still have to tell my dad how much I appreciate him, love him and how thankful I am for all he has done — although I'm a little apprehensive about how he will respond to my mushy affections.

It's not uncommon for fathers to struggle with expressing their love for their children, but also with loving their children equally. Some rejoice at the birth of a son and grieve when a daughter is born.

Their houses are in ruins.

They are trying to salvage what they can to start rebuilding.

And they're doing it alone.

That's the plight of many Nepalese villagers in the wake of the April 25 earthquake.

Many refugees around the world have to make a grim decision: what few things can they carry in their arms and on their backs as they try to run for safety and freedom?

This week the United Nations refugee agency said the number of people forced to flee their homes by war and oppression is now as large as a major nation: nearly 60 million people, or a little larger than the population of Italy. It may be the largest number of refugees ever recorded.

As South Koreans continue to struggle with the worst outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, ever recorded outside the Middle East, their comrades to the north say, "We've got a cure for that!"

The World Health Organization says there's no known cure or vaccine for MERS, but state-run media in Pyongyang reports a wonder drug called Kumdang-2 will do the trick. The report makes no mention of whether Pyongyang is going to offer this miracle compound to its neighbor to the south. Or as the news agency puts it: "the Korean puppet authorities" in Seoul.

Soda is at the crossroads.

The U.S. is still a world leader in taking the pause that refreshes (and causes weight gain).

But soda drinking is flat or declining in the West. The reasons are many: Health consciousness. Bottled water. Energy drinks.

So the Big Soda companies are spending money to develop new markets in low- and middle-income countries. In some of these places, people are earning a bit more than a few years before, so they have more money for soda.

Would you drink fewer cans of soda if a national tax jacked up the price?

When it comes to schemes to counter the staggering rates of obesity and diabetes around the world, there's a growing consensus that taxes that force consumers to reckon, via their pocketbooks, with their food and drink habits might be the way to go.

But since so few countries — or cities — have dared to try a "sin" tax on soda or junk food, no one really knows if they'd actually work.

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