World News

Goats and Soda
1:25 am
Wed May 20, 2015

She's Got One Of The Toughest Diseases To Cure. And She's Hopeful

Jenny Tenorio Gallegos, 35, in Lima, Peru, is being treated for drug-resistant TB. The treatment lasts two years and may rob her of her hearing.
Jason Beaubien/NPR

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 12:44 pm

Drug-resistant tuberculosis is not only airborne and lethal; it's one of the most difficult diseases in the world to cure.

In Peru, 35-year-old Jenny Tenorio Gallegos wheezes even when she's sitting still. That's because of the damage tuberculosis has done to her lungs. The antibiotics she's taking to treat extensively drug-resistant TB nauseate her, give her headaches, leave her exhausted and are destroying her hearing.

"At times I don't hear well," she says. "You have to speak loud for me to be able to understand."

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Parallels
1:25 am
Wed May 20, 2015

Live On Pakistani TV: A Call-In Show About Sex

Dr. Nadim Uddin Siddiqui hosts a weekly call-in show about sexual issues on a Pakistani cable television channel. The program, Clinic Online, is a rarity for a conservative Muslim nation, but has proved popular, particularly among women.
Abdul Sattar NPR

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 10:09 am

It's long been assumed that, in conservative Islamic societies, sex is a subject to be spoken about, if it's discussed at all, in guilty whispers.

Yet, for many months now, women in Pakistan have been dialing in to a TV show to ask about profoundly personal issues — live on air.

"I have to talk about my husband," said a woman who gave her name as Sonia on one of the show's recent editions. "His sperm count is very low ..."

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Goats and Soda
4:14 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Home-Brewed Morphine Is Around The Corner

Families harvest poppy bulbs in the Badakhshan province of Afghanistan. To collect the opium, they score the bulbs and let the milky substance ooze out. The dried residue contains about 10 percent morphine.
David Guttenfelder AP/National Geographic

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 7:09 pm

Making morphine — or heroin*, for that matter — isn't easy. You have to know a bunch of fancy chemistry to synthesize the drug from scratch. Or you have to get your hands on some opium poppies and extract morphine from the flowers' milky juice.

The latter is tougher than it sounds. Sure, the beautiful flowers grow across millions of acres around the world. But farming and trading poppies are tightly regulated both by laws and by drug kingpins.

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Parallels
4:14 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

After A Big Victory For ISIS, Iraqi Forces Look To Regroup

A car is engulfed by flames during clashes in Ramadi on Saturday. Islamic State militants drove Iraqi security forces out of the city, which is just 70 miles west of Baghdad.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:06 pm

The black flag of the self-proclaimed Islamic State is flying over the Iraqi city of Ramadi after government forces collapsed and the extremists seized control over the weekend.

Thousands of civilians have fled Ramadi and those left behind face a chaotic situation.

"No food, no fuel, no electricity. It's very difficult there," says Sheikh Hekmat Suleiman, an adviser to the governor of Anbar Province. Ramadi is the provincial capital, and the local government has now fled the city, just 70 miles west of Baghdad.

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National Security
2:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Fall Of Ramadi Sparks New Criticism Over U.S. Strategy In Iraq

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We're joined now by NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman. And Tom, we just heard in Alice's report that Shiite militias are the units looking to help retake the city of Ramadi. Is that something the U.S. government would support?

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Business
2:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Takata Expands Airbag Recall To Nearly 34 Million Vehicles

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And now to the largest auto recall in U.S. history. The Japanese company Takata is doubling its airbag recall from 17 million to now nearly 34 million. NPR's Jason Margolis reports.

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Middle East
2:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Journalist Austin Tice Still Missing In Syria After More Than 1,000 Days

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
2:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Eyes In The Sky: Foam Drones Keep Watch On Rain Forest Trees

A man and his drone: Carlos Casteneda of the Amazon Basin Conservation Association prepares to launch one of his plastic foam planes.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:46 pm

A couple of toy planes are out to catch illegal loggers and miners in the Amazon.

It's an awesome responsibility.

Every year, illegal logging and mining in the Peruvian Amazon destroy tens of thousands of acres of rain forest. The deforestation in remote parts of the jungle is difficult to detect while it's going on.

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Goats and Soda
2:08 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

A 10-Year-Old Makes A Video So We 'Don't Forget Nepal'

Lucas met this woman who lost her home and all her children except for one daughter.
Donatella Lorch for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 2:53 pm

Like mother, like son.

Lucas Zutt is the 10-year-old son of journalist Donatella Lorch, who frequently contributes to Goats and Soda. They've lived in Kathmandu since June 2013.

Lucas shared his impressions of the earthquake with NPR after it struck. And now he's made a video.

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The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Takata Agrees To Declare Air Bags Defective In Nearly 34M Vehicles

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 2:05 pm

Updated at 3:13 p.m. ET

Japanese air bag supplier Takata says nearly 34 million vehicles were fitted with its defective inflator mechanisms, doubling the number of vehicles affected in the U.S., the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Tuesday.

The recall is believed to be the largest in NHTSA's history.

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Parallels
11:08 am
Tue May 19, 2015

An English 'Family Business,' Dedicated To A 2,000-Year-Old Roman Fort

Teams of volunteer archaeologists travel to Vindolanda during each excavation season. They painstakingly scrape and brush away at the soil to see what they can find.
Rich Preston NPR

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:06 pm

The world is full of family-run businesses that get passed down through generations. A family business in northern England, near the border with Scotland, will carry you back in time 2,000 years.

For the last couple of millennia, Vindolanda was hidden underground. This ancient Roman fort was buried beneath trees, then fields where oblivious farmers planted crops and grazed their sheep for centuries. Under the farmer's plow, the ruined city sat undisturbed — mostly.

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The Two-Way
9:00 am
Tue May 19, 2015

British Police Arrest 9 Over Audacious Easter Jewelry Heist

Surveillance camera images issued by the Metropolitan Police show thieves entering and leaving the scene of the burglary of the Hatton Garden Safe Deposit company. Police arrested seven suspects Tuesday.
Metropolitan Police PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 12:40 pm

The crime drew international headlines for its ingenious design and massive take. But now Scotland Yard says its "Flying Squad" has arrested seven men, ages 48 to 76, over the Hatton Garden theft that was reportedly one of the richest heists in Britain's history.

The arrests took place Tuesday, when more than 200 officers raided 12 addresses in north London and Kent, police say. They recovered some of the heist's haul, which has been difficult to estimate (but has been placed at up to $300 million).

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The Two-Way
7:33 am
Tue May 19, 2015

Longtime 'Charlie Hebdo' Cartoonist Announces He's Quitting

French cartoonist Luz, seen here in January, says he will leave the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo this fall.
Ian Langsdon EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 8:49 am

The cartoonist who drew the image of the Prophet Muhammad that appeared on the comeback issue of Charlie Hebdo is leaving the satirical magazine, citing stress and a lack of inspiration. The cartoonist, Luz, was one of the few artists who survived January's attack on the magazine's office in Paris.

"I will no longer be Charlie Hebdo, but I will always be Charlie," said Luz.

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Europe
3:10 am
Tue May 19, 2015

Macedonia's Wiretapping Scandal Worsens Political Tensions

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 1:03 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Parallels
1:25 am
Tue May 19, 2015

Conservative, Catholic Ireland Votes On Same-Sex Marriage

A campaign poster in Dublin encourages voters to say no to same-sex marriage ahead of a referendum in Dublin on Friday.
Paul Faith AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 3:17 pm

Ireland could make history this week. Same-sex marriage is legal in about 17 countries around the world. In all of those countries, the decision was made by the legislature or the courts. Ireland appears poised to become the first country to legalize same-sex marriage through a national popular vote set for Friday.

In Dublin, it is impossible to miss the debate. Nearly every lamppost carries a big poster, or several.

"YES: Equality for everybody," reads one showing a diverse group of smiling people.

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Goats and Soda
1:24 am
Tue May 19, 2015

They're Going Door To Door In The Amazon To See Why People Get Sick

Researchers meet participants: (from left) investigator Jose Luis Roca; Dr. Ernesto Ortiz; study participants Rainer Leon and his mother, Rina Leon Chanbilla; and nurse Jennifer Rampas.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 8:14 am

Is it the mercury or the malaria?

Or maybe it's something else entirely that's making people sick in the Peruvian Amazon.

Those questions are bedeviling researchers from Duke University who have been studying gold mining in the region. Illegal mining has exploded in the area in the past decade, and the people living downriver have a variety of medical issues, from malaria to anemia to high blood pressure.

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Fine Art
3:45 pm
Mon May 18, 2015

Artist Shirin Neshat Captures Iran's Sharp Contrasts In Black And White

Shirin Neshat is an Iranian-born visual artist who has made her home country's turbulent history the subject of high art. The Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C., is hosting a retrospective of her work. Above, Neshat's 1999 Rapture Series.
Photograph by Larry Barns Courtesy Gladstone Gallery

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 9:22 pm

Shirin Neshat, the most famous contemporary artist to come from Iran, is playing with her rambunctious Labrador puppy in her airy Manhattan apartment. "Ashi, Ashi, come here!" she calls.

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The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Mon May 18, 2015

Elian Gonzalez Says He Would Like To Visit U.S. As A Tourist

Elian Gonzalez attends the closing ceremony of the legislative session at the National Assembly in Havana on Dec. 20, 2014. Gonzalez tells ABC News that he would like to visit the U.S. as a tourist.
Ramon Espinosa AP

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 4:41 pm

Elian Gonzalez, the Cuban boy who was seized 15 years ago from his relatives in Miami by U.S. government officials who returned him to his native country, says he would like to visit the United States as a tourist.

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Politics
2:45 pm
Mon May 18, 2015

White House Says Fall Of Ramadi, Iraq, Is A 'Setback'

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 4:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Iraq
2:45 pm
Mon May 18, 2015

Self-Declared Islamic State Takes Iraqi City Of Ramadi

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 7:11 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
2:18 pm
Mon May 18, 2015

Cellphones Or School? What Makes Kids Around The World Happy

Kids in Cape Town socialize as they walk to school. Children in South Africa often don't get to play outside by themselves because of the high rate of violent crimes in some areas.
Henk Badenhorst Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 3:52 pm

What's bugging children around the world?

Kids in South Africa say they're not very happy about their opportunities to play safely outdoors. Kids in Algeria and Ethiopia say they don't get enough time to play, in general, because they are needed at home to help with siblings and chores. Kids in European countries are less satisfied with their time in school than those in some African countries.

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The Two-Way
12:42 pm
Mon May 18, 2015

Labor Groups Blast Working Conditions In Qatar Ahead Of World Cup

In this photo taken May 3 during a government-organized media tour, Kuttamon Chembadnan Velayi from Kerala, India, speaks to journalists while sitting on his bed in a room he shares with seven other Indian laborers in Doha, Qatar. The housing facility has been cited by Qatari labor officials for substandard conditions.
Maya Alleruzzo AP

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 2:10 pm

Worker-rights groups are calling labor conditions in Qatar "horrific" and urging FIFA sponsors to take responsibility ahead of the 2022 soccer World Cup. Their call comes on the same day the BBC said a reporting crew spent two nights in a Qatari jail for trying to film migrant workers who are building the infrastructure for the sporting event.

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Asia
2:58 am
Mon May 18, 2015

Rohingya Migrants Left Out At Sea, No Country Will Allow Them Ashore

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 4:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Iraq
2:58 am
Mon May 18, 2015

ISIS Takes Control Of Ramadi, Key Iraqi City

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 7:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Asia
2:58 am
Mon May 18, 2015

How China's Censors Influence Hollywood

Daniel Craig as James Bond in Skyfall. Chinese censors cut a scene from the movie that they thought made China look weak. Because China is such a huge market, some U.S. moviemakers may choose to avoid portraying China in negative terms.
Danjaq/Eon Productions The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 5:58 pm

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Goats and Soda
1:53 am
Mon May 18, 2015

It's Not A Come-On From A Cult. It's A New Kind Of Poll!

Among the topics: Would it be better to put the natural gas money in a rainy day fund or spend it now? If you do spend it, what's the most urgent need? Roads? Schools? Clinics?
Courtesy of the Center for Global Development

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:42 pm

You get a visit by someone you've never met before. You're invited on an all-expense paid trip to your country's biggest city for a two-day meeting on natural gas policy.

Oh, and if you show up you get a free cellphone!

It might sound sketchy. But it's actually an innovative strategy that is being tested by researchers at a Washington, D.C.-based think-tank, the Center for Global Development, or CGD, to help the African nation of Tanzania decide how to spend its expected windfall from new discoveries of natural gas.

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The Two-Way
1:44 am
Mon May 18, 2015

In Seoul, Kerry Calls N. Korea Provocations 'Egregious,' 'Reckless'

South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry hold a joint news conference following meetings at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Seoul.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 8:52 am

Given the always-present tensions in this region, it's no surprise that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry's visit to Seoul on Monday was all about security.

"We are not seeking conflict, we are seeking a peaceful resolution of the differences that still exist after so many years on the peninsula," Kerry said.

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World
3:19 pm
Sun May 17, 2015

Wiretapping Scandal In Macedonia Unleashes A Political Backlash

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 6:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Iraq
3:19 pm
Sun May 17, 2015

Islamic State Claims To Have Seized Iraqi City of Ramadi

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 6:56 pm

The self-declared Islamic State claims to have seized Ramadi, the capital of Iraq's Anbar province. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with international correspondent Alice Fordham, who has reported extensively from Iraq and is following the situation from Beirut.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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The Two-Way
2:56 pm
Sun May 17, 2015

Indonesian Military Chief Defends 'Virginity Tests' For Female Recruits

Female soldiers perform martial arts at a ceremony in Jakarta. Women in Indonesia must undergo an invasive "virginity test" to join the military.
Agung Kuncahya B. Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 8:26 am

Indonesia's top military commander defended a requirement that female recruits undergo an invasive "virginity test" to determine whether they are morally suited for the armed forces. His remarks follow a letter from Human Rights Watch condemning the practice.

"So what's the problem? It's a good thing, so why criticize it?" Gen. Moeldoko was quoted by The Jakarta Globe as telling reporters on Friday.

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