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NPR Story
3:04 am
Tue March 24, 2015

U.S. Withdraws Remaining Personnel From Volatile Yemen

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 8:10 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
4:49 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

You're Just A Blob In Layers Of Plastic

It's not the real deal. This Ebola Treatment Unit was set up for a TED talk in Vancouver so people could get a sense of what the units are like, and what it's like to put on the protective suit.
Nina Gregory

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 4:52 pm

At his TED Talk in Vancouver last week, Bill Gates posed the idea that, "If anything kills over 10 million people in the next few decades, it's most likely to be a highly infectious virus, rather than a war. Not missiles, but microbes." He noted how the Ebola crisis in West Africa, which has taken about 10,000 lives, revealed serious problems in our global health care system. It's not that the systems didn't work well enough, he said. "We didn't have a system at all." He called the response "a global failure."

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World
3:48 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

In Royal Goodbye, Hundreds Line Up To See King Richard III's Coffin

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 4:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
3:48 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

In Defending Two-State Solution, White House Chief Of Staff Slams Netanyahu

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 8:14 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It's All Politics
3:17 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Obama Chief Of Staff: Israel's 50-Year 'Occupation' Must End

"An occupation that has lasted for almost 50 years must end," White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough told the annual J Street conference
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 5:22 pm

Through his chief of staff, President Obama is strongly countering rhetoric from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on a two-state, Israeli-Palestinian solution.

"An occupation that has lasted for almost 50 years must end, and the Palestinian people must have the right to live in and govern themselves in their own sovereign state," Denis McDonough, President Obama's chief of staff, said Monday at the annual conference of J Street, a left-leaning pro-Israel group.

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The Two-Way
12:19 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Israel's Netanyahu Apologizes For Remarks On Arab Voters

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 12:52 pm

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has apologized to his country's Arab citizens for his comments ahead of last week's elections, saying he did not intend to offend them when he said Israel's Arabs were voting "in droves" to unseat his government.

"I know the things I said a few days ago hurt some of Israel's citizens and hurt Israel's Arabs. I had no intention to do that. I apologize for it," he said at a meeting with representatives of Israel's minority communities.

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The Salt
12:19 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Liberte, Egalite, Gastronomie? France Rallies To Defend Its Food's Honor

A sampling of the multicourse menu served at the Gout de France dinner at the French embassy in Washington, D.C.: (clockwise from top left): seasonal vegetables with winter truffle Bayonne ham crisps; slowly cooked monkfish with fennel pollen flavors in "Armoricaine" sauce; Ariane apple and Guanaja chocolate onctueux; Saint-Nectaire cheese and grilled bread with nuts and raisins.
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 8:48 am

What do the French do when their economy and identity are under assault? Throw a dinner party, of course – a global one.

From Madagascar to Washington, D.C., more than 1,000 French chefs on five continents hosted multi-course gastronomic dinners last Thursday in celebration – and defense – of France's culinary prowess.

At one dinner, at the Chateau of Versailles west of Paris, around 600 guests (including NPR), dined in the lamp-lit Battles' Gallery, flanked by oil paintings of French military victories through the ages.

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Goats and Soda
11:07 am
Mon March 23, 2015

You Think Your City Is Full Of Trash? Ha!

Even Oscar the Grouch might be put off by the growing heaps of trash in the center of Kathmandu.
Donatella Lorch

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 4:51 pm

They don't call it Trashmandu for nothing.

In Nepal's capital city of Kathmandu, garbage is pretty much everywhere. It's stuffed in plastic bags and dropped in drainage ditches. It's piled high in empty lots, on the roadside and on the edges of the city's sewage-filled rivers.

It is thrown out of bus windows and off rooftops into neighbors' yards.

It's hard to believe Kathmandu could get any worse. But this month, it did.

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The Two-Way
10:22 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Singapore Mourns Founding Leader Lee Kuan Yew

A woman lights candles in memory of Lee Kuan Yew at a community center in Singapore. Lee, Singapore's first premier, died Monday at the age of 91.
Wallace Woon EPA /Landov

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 11:28 am

Lee Kuan Yew, the founding father of Singapore who transformed the sleepy British colony into a commercial powerhouse, is being mourned today in his country and beyond.

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Parallels
10:07 am
Mon March 23, 2015

An Object Of Desire: Hope And Yearning For The Internet In Cuba

The Havana studio of prominent artist Kcho is ringed by Cubans with their heads buried in screens. Users say the only other free Internet connection in Havana is at the U.S. Interests Section.
Eyder Peralta NPR

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 4:05 pm

After the sun sets on Havana on weekends, G Street turns into a kind of runway.

Blocks of the promenade — which is very colonial with its big, beautiful statues and impeccable topiaries — swell with crowds of young Cubans. For the most part, they just walk up and down, greeting each other with kisses.

It's a spectacle: Everyone, it seems, is here to impress. They're perfectly coiffed, perfectly matched; they're splayed on benches, arms wrapped around each other.

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The Two-Way
9:18 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Yemen Descends Into Chaos As Foreign Minister Seeks Help From Neighbors

Anti-Houthi protesters demonstrate in Yemen's southwestern city of Taiz on Monday.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 11:12 am

Britain reportedly has withdrawn its remaining special forces from Yemen, days after a similar U.S. move, in response to the worsening security that the U.N. envoy for Yemen described as the "edge of civil war."

The reported development comes as Yemeni Foreign Minister Riyadh Yaseen called on his Arab neighbors to intervene militarily to stop the inroads made by Shiite Houthi fighters in the predominantly Sunni Muslim country.

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Middle East
4:02 am
Mon March 23, 2015

ISIS Posts 'Wanted' List Of 100 U.S. Military Personnel

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 8:02 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Interviews
3:17 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Transcript: NPR's Interview With Afghan President Ashraf Ghani

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 5:38 am

Aghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani is in Washington, D.C., this week for his first official visit. He will go to Capitol Hill and to the White House, where he's expected to push to slow down the drawdown of American troops so that more of them will stay longer in Afghanistan.

That request will be taken seriously, in no small part because President Obama has embraced Ghani as the partner he never had in former President Hamid Karzai.

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Goats and Soda
1:38 am
Mon March 23, 2015

As Ebola Crisis Ebbs, Aid Agencies Turn To Building Up Health Systems

Light shines through the chlorine-stained windows in the blood-testing area at Redemption Hospital in New Kru Town, Monrovia, Liberia.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 4:16 pm

Michelle Niescierenko is a pediatric emergency physician at Boston Children's Hospital. But for the past five months she has been in Liberia, helping the country's 21 public hospitals get back on their feet after the devastating Ebola outbreak there. She says the challenges they face are shocking.

"Almost all the hospitals that we worked with in Liberia are running on generators," she says. The trouble with generators is that they require fuel.

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

Ashraf Ghani: U.S. Critical To Afghanistan's Future

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani at the Blair House in Washington, D.C. Ghani will be meeting with President Obama this week.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 6:03 am

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani tells NPR that most people in his country want a continued U.S. troop presence and that his government is determined to make sure that the self-declared Islamic State does not gain a foothold.

Ghani, on an official visit to the United States, spoke in a wide-ranging interview with Morning Edition host Renee Montagne to be broadcast on Monday.

He says the perception that Afghans are eager for U.S. troops to leave the country is simply untrue. "They see the United States as critical to their future," he says.

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Author Interviews
3:23 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

'13 Men,' No Clear Answers: Digging Into An Indian Gang Rape Case

In 13 Men journalist Sonia Faleiro chronicles the real-life case of "Baby" — a 20-year-old woman from the tribal village of Subalpur in West Bengal, India. Baby falls in love with a Muslim outsider and, she tells police, is gang-raped as punishment. Villagers maintain that Baby's story was fabricated.
Picasa Sonia Faleiro

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 11:26 am

Last year, a 20-year-old woman left the Indian capital city of New Delhi and returned to the rural village where she grew up so she could take care of her sick mother.

The woman's name isn't public, but Sonia Faleiro — a journalist who's been investigating her case — calls her "Baby." She says Baby was known as a high-profile figure in her modest village.

"She became a somebody," Faleiro tells NPR's Kelly McEvers. "A landowner. An employed young woman. She had money to spend. And she refused to accept that she needed to be like everyone else."

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Parallels
2:37 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

Founding Father Of Modern Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, Dies At 91

The crowd cheers as Singapore's former Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew (center) arrives at the Marina Bay Floating Platform for the annual National Day Parade celebrations in Singapore on Aug. 9, 2012.
Calvin Wong Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 6:03 am

Lee Kuan Yew, the founding father of modern Singapore and one of Asia's most influential politicians, has died at age 91, according to the Singapore Prime Minister's office.

During more than a half-century as Singapore's leader, he helped turn the city-state from a sleepy British colony into an affluent and efficient trading enclave, which enjoys the world's third-highest per capita GDP.

But he was also criticized for running a one-party, authoritarian regime under which critics were muzzled and political rivals hounded.

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The Two-Way
11:48 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Top Beijing Scientist: China Faces 'Huge Impact' From Climate Change

Smoke billows from chimneys of a steel plant on a hazy day in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, earlier this month.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 5:06 pm

China's top weather scientist has made a rare official acknowledgement: climate change, he says, could have a "huge impact" on the country's crop yields and infrastructure.

Zheng Guogang, the head of China's meteorological administration, tells Xinhua news agency that China is already experiencing temperature increases that outpace those in other parts of the world.

As a result, China — the world's biggest emitter of greenhouse gases — faces a possible "ecological degradation," he says.

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Parallels
10:03 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Parisians Sing The Praises Of 'Singin In The Rain'

An actor performs during a March 9 rehearsal of Singin' in the Rain on the stage of the Theatre du Chatelet in Paris. American musicals were rarely performed in France in the past, but have been a huge hit in recent years.
Jacques Demarthon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 5:43 am

Once again, Parisians are ecstatic over the latest American musical production playing at the city's Chatelet Theatre.

"Singin' in the Rain is a little corner of paradise," the French newspaper Le Figaro wrote of the show, which is playing through March 26 to sold-out audiences.

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Goats and Soda
9:08 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Keeping Women Out Of The Workforce Is Economic Nonsense

A mine-lift operator in Yenakievo, Ukraine.
Misha Friedman

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 11:48 am

Gender equality is "humanity's biggest project," Lakshmi Puri told the United Nations this past week. Puri, the deputy executive director of U.N. Women, wants to achieve "Planet 50-50" by 2030.

When it comes to the workplace, equal employment opportunities aren't just a benefit to women. Several new studies point out that discriminatory practices that keep women out of the workforce are not only unjust, but economically nonsensical as well.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Sun March 22, 2015

ISIS Issues 'Wanted' List Of 100 U.S. Military Personnel

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 8:10 am

The self-declared Islamic State has posted names, photos and what it says are addresses of 100 U.S. military personnel, calling on its supporters to "deal" with them.

The extremist group's so-called "hacking division," says the individuals have been part of efforts to defeat ISIS in Syria, Iraq and Yemen.

It says it has decided to release the information about the U.S. servicemen and servicewomen so "brothers in America can deal with you."

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Parallels
7:53 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Qatar Digital Library Preserves The Music Of A Vanishing Past

Ṣawt musicians during a performance in Kuwait in May 2014.
Rolf Killius Qatar Digital Library

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 11:30 am

The songs our grandparents sang can tell us who we are. Here in the U.S., the Lomax family became famous in the 1930s, when they recorded America's folk music.

In other countries that are changing fast, people are also trying to hold onto their heritage. The tiny, super-rich state of Qatar takes pride in its modernity, with its gleaming skyscrapers and lucrative gas fields. But it is also investing in a huge history project.

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The Two-Way
7:08 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Shiite Rebels In Yemen Reportedly Seize Parts Of Southern City

Anti-Houthi protesters carry an injured fellow protester during clashes with Houthi fighters in Yemen's southwestern city of Taiz on Sunday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 5:09 pm

Updated at 3:05 p.m. ET

Houthi rebels who have already seized most of Yemen's capital, Sanaa, have now captured parts of one of the country's largest cities, a day after the U.S. withdrew about 100 U.S. military personnel from another city besieged by rival al-Qaida fighters.

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Afghanistan
6:01 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Afghan President Makes First Official Visit To Washington

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 12:21 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Europe
6:01 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Putin Critics Said To Be On Russian 'Kill List'

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 1:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Africa
6:01 am
Sun March 22, 2015

In Nigeria, Voters Question President's Advance On Boko Haram

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 7:19 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
5:03 am
Sun March 22, 2015

'How Unromantic It Is To Die Of Tuberculosis In The 21st Century'

Polina, 37, rests in a hospital bed in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 2011. She is severely malnourished and suffers from numerous diseases, including tuberculosis, hepatitis C and HIV.
Misha Friedman

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 12:40 pm

As the Ebola epidemic in West Africa slows and falls from the headlines, there is a temptation among many to view this outbreak as an isolated event. In fact, the opposite is true. Ebola is the tip of a global health crisis: a crisis in our collective ability to deliver the essentials of modern medicine to those who need help the most, in the most timely and efficient manner.

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World
3:51 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

After Students Went To Wage Jihad, Teacher Highlights Youth Radicalization

Lamya Kaddor teaches Islamic studies in Germany. She's written a new book, Zum Toeten Bereit (Ready To Kill), about the experience of having five former students flee to Syria to join jihadist groups.
Andre Zelck Courtesy of Piper Verlag GmbH

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 5:41 pm

Lamya Kaddor, a German-Syrian religious studies teacher and expert on Islam, was horrified to learn in 2013 that five of her former students had departed Germany to join jihadist groups in Syria.

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The Two-Way
11:22 am
Sat March 21, 2015

Pope Accepts Resignation Of Cardinal Accused Of Sexual Misconduct

Cardinal Keith O'Brien stands at a window in a room in his home in Edinburgh, Scotland, in February 2013 when he first tendered his resignation over sexual misconduct allegations.
David Moir Reuters/Landov

Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of Scottish Cardinal Keith O'Brien, accused of sexual misconduct, who will lose the "rights and privileges" of his clerical office but be allowed to retain his title.

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The Two-Way
11:07 am
Sat March 21, 2015

Judge Rules U.S. Must Release Photos Of Prisoner Abuse In Iraq, Afghanistan

A cell block at the now-closed Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad, a facility notorious for photos released in 2004 showing U.S. soldiers torturing and humiliating inmates.
Karim Kadim AP

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 1:51 pm

A U.S. district judge ruled Friday that the U.S. must release photos of American soldiers inflicting abuse on prisoners in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The ruling is a victory for The American Civil Liberties Union, which filed a lawsuit against the government in 2004, seeking the release of the photos. The ACLU claimed the pictures revealed significant human rights violations, specifically at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

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