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Iraqi authorities have moved a group of more than 1,300 foreign women and children — the family members of suspected ISIS fighters — and a refugee agency is raising the alarm about their precarious situation and the specter of retribution.

"The families had been held in a camp in Kurdish-controlled territory while Iraq figures out what to do with them," NPR's Jane Arraf reports.

The CIA has a favorite phrase: "We can neither confirm nor deny."

It was born as part of a strange Cold War drama, involving Howard Hughes, that now has a new twist.

Back in March 1968, a Soviet submarine and its nuclear missiles suffered a catastrophic accident and sank to the dark, chilly floor of the Pacific. All 98 sailors died.

The Problem With Free Menstrual Pads

Sep 18, 2017

Sanitary pads are expensive. And in some parts of the world, hard to come by. So why not give pads away for free?

Toilets in Geneva were clogged with tens of thousands of dollars' worth of discarded cash earlier this summer — and nobody knows why.

The bathrooms at a branch of the UBS bank in Geneva, as well as in three nearby restaurants, had pipes stuffed with 500-euro bills that had apparently been cut up with scissors and flushed down the toilets. The mysterious misplaced funds were first reported by a Swiss newspaper, and local authorities have confirmed the incident to multiple media outlets.

Stanislav Petrov was a lieutenant colonel in the Soviet Union's Air Defense Forces, and his job was to monitor his country's satellite system, which was looking for any possible nuclear weapons launches by the United States.

Nine months after Iraqi forces drove ISIS from eastern Mosul, the east side's main street has come back to life. Wedding convoys decorated with ribbons and flowers honk their horns. Female drivers pull up in front of pastry shops and stalls piled high with fresh fruit.

Young men cruise by with car stereos tuned to upbeat music instead of ISIS radio and lectures on Islam. Signs advertise new pool halls and shisha lounges.

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This is a big week not just for President Trump but for leaders from all over the world. They are just settling in for the annual U.N. General Assembly in New York City.

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Four American students who are studying abroad in Europe had acid thrown at them at a train station in Marseille, France, yesterday. French police are saying that this was a random attack. Here's NPR's Eleanor Beardsley.

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Here in the United States, it seems like every week, there's a new variation of yoga.

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UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: It is the latest craze among fitness fans and...

A narrow majority of Americans don't trust President Trump to handle the conflict with North Korea, according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll.

The findings come as the president and his diplomatic team prepare for the United Nations General Assembly in New York this week, where North Korea's renegade nuclear program will be a major focus.

North Korea test-launched another missile Friday that arced over northern Japan and into the Pacific, showing its progress toward being able to strike the U.S. and signaling its defiance of U.N. sanctions imposed after its sixth, and most recent, nuclear test earlier this month.

For just under half an hour Saturday night, President Trump and his South Korean counterpart, Moon Jae-in, tackled the missile threat looming from Pyongyang. The pair of leaders condemned North Korea's recent ballistic missile test — and once more vowed to strengthen their joint defenses and ratchet up economic pressure on Kim Jong Un still further.

Police in London say they've arrested a second man in connection to Friday's attack on the city's subway.

The 21-year-old was arrested in west London around 11:30 p.m. Saturday under the Terrorism Act, the Metropolitan Police Service said in a statement. He was taken to a south London police station for questioning but he has yet to be charged or identified.

A Virgin Islands Author On Irma

Sep 17, 2017

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When writer Tiphanie Yanique watched Hurricane Irma smack into the Caribbean, it immediately took her back. Yanique is from the island of St. Thomas. And she was a high-school student when Hurricane Marilyn hit in 1995.

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The Vietnam War changed the way America saw itself and its role in the world.

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Updated at 11 a.m. ET Sunday

With a pair of Sunday television interviews, President Trump's administration furthered ambiguity on the United States' position with regard to the Paris climate agreement.

On CBS' Face The Nation, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was asked by John Dickerson if there was a chance the U.S could stay in the accord.

Dan Lee rarely talks about his status as a DACA recipient. Apart from having close family and friend confidants, the secret of being in the country illegally has weighed heavily on Lee ever since he learned he didn't have the proper paperwork in high school while applying for a job.

In an interview with NPR's Michel Martin, Lee remembers being 15 and thinking "What is the point of me doing anything if I'm not going to able to have a career or be able to, I guess, be 'normal'?"

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'The State' Explores Life Inside ISIS

Sep 16, 2017

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A four-part series is about to debut on National Geographic in the United States with characters set in an unlovely landscape of bombings, beatings and beheadings. It's a fictional story based on fact of four young Britons who leave home to join ISIS, the Islamic State.

Leprosy is an ancient disease, a biblical curse and, even in the 21st century, a cultural shame so severe that in some countries, patients are sent to live in isolated colonies or tossed out of their own homes.

"I met a woman whose husband and children forced her to live in the cow shed," says Gareth Shrubshole, programs and advocacy officer at the Leprosy Mission. "Her boys refused to share a meal with their own mother." That was in India.

President Trump is about to make his debut at an institution he has often berated. For the first time, he will attend the annual United Nations General Assembly in New York, which brings together leaders of the 193 member nations for a week of meetings and speeches.

As president-elect, he called the U.N. "just a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time."

But it's a "new day" at the U.N., said U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley.

Updated at 4 a.m. ET Sunday

Police in the U.K. have now arrested two men in connection with the explosion on a train Friday that left dozens injured.

London's Metropolitan Police announced on Sunday morning that they arrested a 21-year-old man in the west London area of Hounslow late on Saturday night.

Earlier on Saturday police made what they said was a "significant arrest" of an 18-year-old man in relation to the investigation.

Nearly 400,000 Rohingya people have fled government violence in Myanmar and crossed into neighboring Bangladesh. The majority of them are children — 60 percent, by U.N. estimates. And at least 1,100 are separated from their parents.

The challenges for aid groups are unfathomable with a refugee crisis this large, caused by what Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, the United Nations high commissioner for human rights, says seems to be "a textbook example of ethnic cleansing."

The situation is even more daunting when so many children are at risk.

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The Vatican says it has recalled a priest from its diplomatic mission in Washington, D.C., and launched an investigation into allegations of child pornography.

The priest, who has not been named, is currently in Vatican City, according to a statement from the Vatican. It says the U.S. State Department informed Vatican officials on August 21 "of a possible violation of laws relating to child pornography images by a member of the diplomatic corps of the Holy See accredited to Washington."

Khadija Saddiqi is a soft-voiced, wispy woman. Her clothes and Muslim headscarf are rigorously modest. The only suggestion of her unusual boldness is the bodyguard who stands outside her home in Lahore.

The only evidence of why she might need a guard is the scar near Saddiqi's wrist.

As Saddiqi picked up her 7-year-old sister from school last year, a man lunged at her with a knife, stabbing her in her throat, arms, breasts and back.

"I thought it was the end of my life," says Saddiqi, 22. "I was full of blood."

She knew her attacker well.

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Future Consequences.

About Anab Jain's TED Talk

It's hard to imagine how the future might look and feel. Anab Jain wants to change that. She designs prototypes of potentially grim futures to raise awareness of our choices in the present.

About Anab Jain

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Future Consequences.

About Sam Harris's TED Talk

Does superhuman artificial intelligence sound like science fiction? Not for Sam Harris. He says it's not a question of if but when — with potentially destructive consequences.

About Sam Harris

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