World News

Middle East
3:13 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

What's Next For Egypt After Sisi's Win?

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 5:04 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Middle East
3:13 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

Political Division Over Effect Of Swapping 5 Detainees For POW

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 5:04 pm

In exchange for the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the U.S. transferred five detainees from Guantanamo to Qatar. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Kabul correspondent Sean Carberry about the swap.

The Two-Way
11:07 am
Sun June 1, 2014

A Sisyphean Task Begins As 'Forget' Requests Roll Into Google

Following a European court ruling, Google is taking requests to delete personal information. At one point on Friday, the search engine was getting more than 20 requests a minute.
Jens Meyer AP

Google opened an online form this week allowing European users to request that information about their lives be deleted from the search engine.

In the first 24 hours, more than 12,000 people asked to be "forgotten."

The company was responding to a European Court of Justice ruling in May that said citizens have the right to request certain information be removed, if, for instance, the information is inaccurate or outdated.

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Middle East
10:47 am
Sun June 1, 2014

What Elections? Syrian Opposition Rejects Assad's Expected Win

A mock election poster depicts Syrian President Bashar Assad as Mafia boss Don Corleone, with token candidates kissing his hand.
Ahmed Jalal/Kafranbel Syrian Revolution

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:02 pm

Tuesday's elections in Syria are sure to result in another term for President Bashar Assad, even as the international community says his regime is responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of civilians.

The opposition is railing against his inevitable triumph.

At a demonstration Friday by some of the 1 million Syrians who have fled into neighboring Lebanon, the view on the election was clear.

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The Sunday Conversation
9:58 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Tiananmen Survivor Looks Back At China's 'Lost Opportunity'

Shen Tong was a 20-year-old student in Beijing during the Tiananmen Square massacre.
Courtesy of Teresa Lin

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 10:47 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

This week marks 25 years since the massacre at Tiananmen Square in Beijing. In 1989, Chinese security forces conducted a widespread crackdown on pro-democracy protesters that left hundreds — some say thousands — dead. But months before the standoff, protesters saw no sign of coming violence.

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Afghanistan
5:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Taliban Release U.S. Soldier Taken Hostage In 2009

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 10:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is a WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. This morning, the only American POW of the Afghan War is a free man. Army sergeant Bowe Bergdahl had spent almost five years held captive by the Taliban. President Obama announced the news of his release in an address yesterday at the White House. Standing beside the president, Bergdahl's parents.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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Europe
5:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Le Pen Victory In France Presents A Paradox For Hollande

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 10:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Far-right political parties won big in European parliamentary elections in many countries last weekend. Their victory was particularly painful in France, a founding member of the European Union, and has deepened the sense of crisis for the very unpopular Socialist president, Francois Hollande. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports from Paris.

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Parallels
5:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

For Many Of China's Youth, June 4 May As Well Be Just Another Day

A Chinese man who became known as "Tank Man" stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing's Changan Avenue just outside Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. It's an iconic image known around the world --€” except in China.
Jeff Widener AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 8:14 am

They peered at the photo blankly, leaning to take in the details.

"Is it from South Korea?" asked a student studying for a doctorate in marketing, with no flicker of recognition.

"Is it Kosovo?" a young astronomy major guessed.

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Sports
5:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Favela Experience, For A Taste Of Authentic Brazilian Slum Living

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 10:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If you're planning to go to Brazil for the World Cup, and you don't have your hotel yet, you're probably out of luck unless you're willing to stay off the beaten path in a favela, which is the Portuguese word for slum.

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National Security
5:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Did Suicide Bomber Catch The 'Virus Of Jihadism' In Florida?

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:42 pm

A U.S. citizen who blew himself up in a suicide attack in Syria last week grew up in Florida, according to U.S. officials. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to former FBI Intelligence adviser Philip Mudd.

Europe
5:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Obama's Europe Trip To Mark Poland, D-Day Anniversaries

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 10:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. President Obama wrapped up a big week full of highs and lows - from his foreign policy speech at West Point to the resignation of VA secretary Eric Shinseki, and the news that the sole American POW from the Afghan war has been released.

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Parallels
3:06 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Panama's Canal Divides A Country Into Haves And Have-Nots

Panama has seen dramatic growth since taking over the Panama Canal in 2000 from the U.S. That prosperity can be seen in Panama City's rapidly developing skyline. However, many have not yet seen the benefits, and the country still suffers from widespread poverty.
Arnulfo Franco AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 11:00 am

Jorge Quijano has one of the coolest office views in the Americas: the Pacific port entrance to the Panama Canal. The panoramic vista seems to help Quijano, who heads the Panama Canal Authority, see the bigger picture.

On the one hand, Quijano understands why Panama has run the canal so effectively since the United States handed it over in 2000.

"When the United States built the canal, it was treated like a noncommercial utility, like a water filtration plant," Quijano said in an interview at his Panama City headquarters. "We're running it as a business."

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Movie Interviews
4:20 pm
Sat May 31, 2014

What Is Courage?: 'Korengal' Breaks Down War In Afghanistan

Sgt. 1st Class Mark Patterson checks his men at Outpost Restrepo in Afghanistan, as documented in the new film Korengal.
Outpost Films

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 4:42 pm

In the new documentary Korengal, journalist and director Sebastian Junger again takes viewers into Afghanistan's Korengal Valley — once considered one of the military's most dangerous postings.

The film uses footage shot by Junger and the late photojournalist Tim Hetherington. Between 2007 and 2008, Junger and Hetherington spent 10 months with a platoon of about 30 men at an outpost called Restrepo.

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Afghanistan
3:43 pm
Sat May 31, 2014

American POW Released From Taliban After 5 Years

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:42 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Afghanistan
3:04 pm
Sat May 31, 2014

Who Won The War In Afghanistan? Perhaps No One

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 4:20 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

The release of the Sgt. Bergdahl neatly capped off a week in which President Obama laid out the plan for the end of the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan. At the end of this year, just under 10,000 troops will remain in a support role. By the end of 2016, they'll also be gone. The president did not declare victory. He just said that it was time to turn the page. So in the end, who won?

HASSAN ABBAS: I guess no one, but we'll not know for the next five to ten years, I would guess.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Sat May 31, 2014

Who Are The 5 Guantanamo Detainees In Prisoner Swap?

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 5:34 am

As part of a prisoner swap to free Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the United States agreed to transfer five Guantánamo detainees to Qatar.

NPR's Tom Bowman received a list of the prisoners being released from a Pentagon official. According to documents leaked to the organization WikiLeaks, all five prisoners were high-ranking Taliban officials. Some were considered high-risk and "likely to post a threat to the U.S., its interests and allies."

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The Two-Way
9:39 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Chilean Miners Rally To Beat The Odds Again, At The World Cup

Chile has released a World Cup ad featuring the miners who were trapped underground for 69 days in 2010 and emerged triumphantly, beating all odds and defying death.
bancodechile/YouTube

You don't need to understand Spanish to be stirred by the breathtaking ad released in Chile ahead of the World Cup.

You also don't need to be a devotee of soccer to watch this one-minute, 14-second masterpiece and suddenly feel a burning love for the game.

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Sat May 31, 2014

In India, Fifth Person Is Arrested In Gang Rape, Murder Case

Indian police keep watch at the tree where the bodies of gang rape victims were found hanging.
Chandan Khanna AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 10:01 am

Police have made a fifth arrest in connection to another alleged gang rape and murder in India.

The two girls, ages 14 and 15, were killed and then hanged from a tree in a village more than 100 miles east of New Delhi. The case sparked demonstrations against what villagers perceived was official inaction.

CNN reports that on Saturday, villagers called for the perpetrators to be hanged. The network adds:

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Asia
5:40 am
Sat May 31, 2014

South Korea Repaves For A 'Woman-Friendly Seoul'

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 9:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Seoul, South Korea's making some changes to its urban landscape. The mayor's office says the women-friendly Seoul campaign will make the city more comfortable for women. They say a lot of urban design focused on men when they were the sole workers in a family and that's changed. So, they're installing pink painted parking spots reserved for women that are a bit wider and longer than the average spot and closer to elevators.

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Asia
5:40 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Pakistan Signals Possible Opening In Relations With India

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 9:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Earlier this week the Prime Minister of Pakistan attended the inauguration of the new Prime Minister of India. Now this event is notable not only because India and Pakistan fought several wars and both have nuclear weapons, but also because India's new prime minister, Narendra Modi, is a Hindu nationalist. He is not the kind of politician that you'd imagine Pakistan would welcome in power. We're joined now by Shuja Nawaz. He's director of The South Asia Center at The Atlantic Council. Shuja, thanks for being back with us.

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Middle East
5:40 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Assad Bound For Re-Election As War Appears At A Stalemate

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 9:38 am

As Syria goes to the polls next week in an election that President Bashar Assad is certain to win, journalist Nick Blanford tells NPR's Scott Simon.

Parallels
3:21 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Expanding The Panama Canal: The Problem Is Money, Not Mosquitoes

Men work on the Panama Canal locks near Panama City, on Feb. 21. An acrimonious financial dispute has slowed work on an expansion of the 100-year-old canal that will accommodate larger ships. The work is now expected to be completed next year.
Rodrigo Arangua AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 9:38 am

When the United States built the Panama Canal a century ago, it faced harrowing obstacles, from mudslides to malaria that killed thousands. But history doesn't appear to show a financial dispute with contractors. At least not one that halted labor on the maritime marvel.

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World
2:47 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Activist Icon Resigns, As The Threads Of Her Stories Unravel

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 5:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Somaly Mam has been arguably that world's highest profile crusader against sex trafficking. The Cambodian activist has been named one of Time Magazine's Most Influential People. Last year, Secretary of State John Kerry called her a hero every single day. Actress Susan Sarandon, and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg sit on the board of the foundation that bears her name.

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Asia
2:47 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

25 Years From Tiananmen, China Strives To Keep Activists Silent

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 5:07 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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National Security
2:47 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

An American Suicide Bomber In Syria

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 5:07 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. The State Department has confirmed that a U.S. citizen was involved in the suicide bombing in Syria earlier this week. Today, State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki confirmed the man's identity in response to a reporter's question.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER: Can you confirm, at least, the name that he went by - as was published - Abu Huraya al-Amriki?

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The Two-Way
1:47 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

U.S. Confirms American Carried Out Suicide Bombing In Syria

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 7:15 pm

The State Department on Friday confirmed that a U.S. citizen, who they believe to be Moner Mohammad Abu-Salha, took part in a suicide truck bombing in Syria earlier this week.

Reports that a Syrian rebel calling himself Abu Hurayra al-Amriki (Abu Hurayra the American), a name allegedly adopted by Abu-Salha, carried out the May 25 attack on a Syrian government complex in western Idlib province have been circulating on social media for several days.

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The Two-Way
1:14 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Thailand's Military Ruler Says No Elections For At Least A Year

An anti-coup demonstrator in Bangkok, earlier this week. The country's new military leader says those opposed to the putsch lack an understanding of democracy.
Sakchai Lalit AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 4:02 pm

The leader of Thailand's military junta said it could take a year or more before new elections in the country, as he repeated warnings to protesters opposing last week's coup, saying they lack a "true understanding of democracy."

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Shots - Health News
10:02 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Dengue Fever 101: How Serious Is This Disease?

Kevin Flores, 11, remains under a mosquito net while being treated for dengue fever at La Mascota hospital in Managua, Nicaragua, last fall.
Inti Ocon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 1:56 pm

The painful disease has been around for centuries but began a dramatic upswing in the 1980s. In the Americas alone, the annual number of cases has boomed from 520,000 in 2003 to 2.3 million in 2013. With the World Cup coming up in mid-June, host country Brazil is frantically battling the mosquitoes that carry dengue (pronounced DENG-gey).

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Europe
5:21 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Rare Right-Wing Party Favors EU Integration, Joining Nato

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 10:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Europe's far-right parties did well, really well in last week's elections to the European Parliament. But their embrace of Russia and its annexation of Crimea is not exactly what the far-right counterparts in Ukraine were expecting. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports on a rare right-wing party that favors EU integration and joining NATO.

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Asia
4:19 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Terror Attacks In China Take An Alarming Turn

Smoke rises from Tiananmen Square in Beijing on Oct. 28, when three Uighurs, a mostly Muslim ethnic minority, drove a jeep into a crowd there, killing two tourists. The people inside the car died as well, after they set their vehicle on fire.
STR Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 5:39 pm

China has suffered small-scale terror attacks in the past that often targeted local government in out-of-the-way cities. In the past year, though, the attacks have taken an alarming turn.

Ethnic militants have gone after civilians outside their homeland and employed a relatively new tactic: suicide.

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