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History
5:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

Carnaval In Recife: Long History, Interesting Future

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. It's Carnaval in Brazil - that time of the year when people take to the streets and celebrate before the austerity of Lent begins. And while you may think the Rio de Janeiro when you think of Carnaval, we're going to take you north to Recife. It's considered one of the most diverse carnivals in Brazil. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports from Recife.

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Europe
3:12 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

U.N. Attempting To Find Diplomatic Solutions In Ukraine

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 5:08 pm

The standoff in Crimea is increasing in intensity and has become a focal point of the ongoing conflict in Ukraine. Host Arun Rath talks to NPR's Michele Kelemen about the diplomatic efforts to resolve the standoff in the region.

Europe
3:12 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

Ukraine's Temporary Government Strained By Ongoing Tensions

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 5:08 pm

The brand new government in Ukraine is struggling to respond to the crisis in Crimea. Host Arun Rath talks to NPR's Emily Harris in Kiev about the continuing tensions in the region.

Europe
3:12 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

Russia Approves Troop Action In Ukraine

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 5:08 pm

Russia's upper house of parliament voted Saturday to allow President Vladimir Putin to send Russian troops into Ukraine. Host Arun Rath talks to NPR's Corey Flintoff for the latest from Moscow.

The Two-Way
11:35 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Knife Gang Attacks China Rail Station, Killing Dozens

Picture taken by mobile phone on Saturday shows luggage scattered inside the Kunming Railway Station in Kunming, capital of southwest China's Yunnan Province.
Lin Yiguang Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 9:02 pm

This post was updated at 9:20 p.m. ET.

A gang of 10 knife-wielding men killed at least 29 people and wounded 130 others at a train station in southern China in what the government is describing as a "violent terror attack," Xinhua News Agency reports.

Four of the assailants were also killed by police, reports the Associated Press. One suspect was arrested.

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The Two-Way
9:13 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Thai Protesters Retreat, But Vow To Keep Up Pressure On Government

Thai anti-government protesters leader Suthep Thaugsuban speaks to his supporters during a rally at Silom intersections in Bangkok on Friday.
Rungroj Yongrit EPA /Landov

Thailand's anti-government protesters have temporarily abandoned their street barricades and quit mass demonstrations aimed at shutting down the capital and ousting the country's premier.

But the protesters vowed to regroup at a central location in Bangkok and continue their efforts to force the resignation of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, who was returned to power last month in an election boycotted by the opposition.

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The Two-Way
7:16 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Russia's Parliament Approves Putin's Call For Troops In Ukraine

Young people look at pro-Russian armed men blocking access to the Ukrainian frontier guard base in Balaklava, a small city not far from Sevastopol, on Saturday.
Viktor Drachev AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 4:32 pm

This post was updated at 4:50 p.m. ET.

Russia's parliament has unanimously approved a request by President Vladimir Putin to authorize the intervention of Moscow's forces in Ukraine until "the normalization of the political situation" there. In response, Ukraine put its own forces on alert and warned that a Russian invasion would spark war between the two countries.

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Sports
5:56 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Worldwide Attention Expected For Track Star's Murder Trial

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 9:03 am

South African paralympian Oscar Pistorius goes on trial next week for the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Guardian reporter David Smith about the upcoming court case.

Europe
5:56 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Crimean Government Buildings, Airports Reportedly Threatened

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 9:03 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

We're going to begin this hour with a developing situation in Crimea. Russian Parliment has approved President Vladimir Putin's request to send Russian troops into Ukraine. Now Russia has a naval base in Crimea, a semiautonomous region that is predominately pro-Russian. The request did not specify when or how many troops might be deployed but armed men in uniform are already on the ground.

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Europe
5:56 am
Sat March 1, 2014

U.S. Ambassador On Costs Of Russia's Moves In Ukraine

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 9:03 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And we are joined in the studio now by Ambassador Thomas Pickering. He has served his nation in many different posts, including U.S. ambassador to Russia. He was also, of course, the U.S. representative of the United Nations. Mr. Ambassador, thanks so much for being with us.

THOMAS PICKERING: Good morning, Scott.

SIMON: You just heard our correspondent on the ground in Kiev. President Obama said there will be costs. What could that be?

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Europe
5:56 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Ukraine's Crimea Region Full Of Uncertainty, Rapid Changes

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 9:03 am

Tensions are escalating as armed men take control of airports and set up road blocks in Crimea. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to correspondent Emily Harris, who is in Kiev.

The Salt
3:22 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

'Peak Salmon' May Be Unlikely, But Threats To Farmed Salmon Loom

Farm-raised Norwegian salmon for sale in Oregon in 2009.
Natalie Maynor Flickr

Earlier this month, reporters at Bloomberg and the Financial Times suggested that we might be nearing "peak salmon" — a play on peak oil, in which we theoretically reach maximum production, and the only direction left to go is down.

Their logic? The price for a kilogram (2.2 pounds) of Norwegian farmed salmon at the end of 2013 was 50 percent higher than it had been the previous year.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Obama Warns Russia Against Using Force In Ukraine

President Obama spoke about the Ukraine crisis Friday afternoon, saying, "The United States will stand with the international community in affirming that there will be costs for any military intervention in Ukraine."
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 8:46 pm

Saying that the United States is "deeply concerned" by reports that Russia is taking military action in Ukraine, President Obama urged Russia not to intervene in the destabilized country, where tensions have reached new highs this week.

Obama said that he had spoken to Russia's President Putin in recent days, to foster cooperation in coping with the situation.

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Parallels
3:04 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Syria On Track To Become World's Largest Source Of Refugees

Masses of refugees wait in line to receive food aid distributed in the Yarmouk camp on Jan. 31 in Damascus, Syria.
United Nation Relief and Works Agency/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 8:35 pm

A photo from Syria is grabbing the world's attention: a sea of people lining up for food amid the rubble of a Palestinian refugee camp inside Syria.

Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia was so moved by the image, he took to the Senate floor, saying "a country of 23 million people, a proud country, is being transformed before our eyes to a land of rubble, skeletons, refugees and ghosts."

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Europe
2:01 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Fished From The Water, Soggy Docs Reveal Ukrainian Corruption

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 8:35 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

When Viktor Yanukovych fled Ukraine, he abandoned a sprawling, opulent estate on the outskirts of Kiev. And before he left, he or his associates dumped tens of thousands of documents into a reservoir, documents that paint a stunning picture of government excess and corruption. Journalists have retrieved those soggy papers. They're drying them out and posting them online. Oleg Khomenok runs an investigative journalism project in Ukraine called Scoop. He's been at the presidential compound, helping to go through all those papers.

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Europe
2:01 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Former Ukrainian President Surfaces With Speech In Russia

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 8:35 pm

Ousted Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych made his first public speech since fleeing the country. Financial Times reporter Courtney Weaver discusses the new conference and its reception in Crimea.

National Security
2:01 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Drawn By Twitter And Trained In Syria, Terrorists Could Turn West

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 8:35 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In Syria, some 1,500 groups make up the insurgency. Among them, according to U.S. intelligence officials, are 7,500 foreign fighters from more than 50 countries. They include al-Qaida veterans from Afghanistan and Pakistan and they may be taking aim beyond Syria.

JAMES CLAPPER: And they do harbor designs on attacks in Europe and the homeland.

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News
2:01 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Joint Surveillance Program Stores Millions Of Yahoo Webcam Images

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 8:35 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block. And we begin this hour with two stories of authorities tracking people online. In a moment, we'll hear how some police in this country are using software to look for potential criminal activity on Twitter. But first, something you might think would be more private: webcam chats.

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Parallels
2:01 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

'Invisible' Same-Sex Couples Push For Civil Unions In Greece

Couples kiss during the Athens gay pride parade last June. Last month, activists organized a "kiss-in" during a church service run by a Greek Orthodox bishop who has threatened to excommunicate politicians supporting same-sex unions.
Louisa Gouliamaki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 8:35 pm

It's Sunday afternoon, and six mothers are sitting in a bright living room, drinking milky coffee and talking about discrimination.

"We are invisible in Greece," says Stella Bellia, who is raising twin boys with her Italian partner, Grazia-Haris Scocozza. "So we have to help each other."

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Latin America
10:30 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Venezuela Protests Prove President Maduro Lacks Chavez Charisma

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 8:58 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to turn to Venezuela, where violent protests have filled the streets for two weeks now - a story that may have been overshadowed in this country somewhat by the turmoil in Ukraine. The unrest is putting a spotlight on President Nicolas Maduro and the country's economic problems. We wanted to hear more so we've called Andrew Rosati. He's a freelance journalist based in Caracas, Venezuela. And he's with us from there now. Welcome back, Andrew. Thanks so much for joining us again.

ANDREW ROSATI: Thank you.

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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Chinese Paper Calls Outgoing U.S. Envoy 'Yellow-Skinned, White-Hearted Banana Man'

The Chinese media may not like him, but Gary Locke, the outgoing U.S. ambassador to China, was praised by ordinary Chinese.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 10:05 am

Gary Locke may have won over ordinary Chinese with his conduct in the country, but not everyone was impressed with the first Chinese-American to serve as the U.S. envoy to China.

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Europe
5:13 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Soviet Legacy May Fuel Ukraine's Resistance To Russian Domination

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 5:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, as Michele mentioned, one flashpoint between Russia and Ukraine is the region of Crimea, a Russian province for hundreds of years that only became part of Ukraine in 1954. At the time, Russia and Ukraine were both Soviet republics, so the transfer was largely symbolic. Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev did it to mark the 300th anniversary of a Russian-Ukrainian alliance.

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The Two-Way
5:04 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Crisis In Ukraine: Gunmen At Airport; Yanukovych Vows To Return

On Friday, armed men took control of the international airport in the city of Simferopol, on the Crimean peninsula. Gunmen took control of another airport in Crimea, as well.
David Mdzinarishvili Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 7:28 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Kiev
We'll be adding updates as the day continues.

The crisis in Ukraine took another ominous turn when gunmen in unmarked military uniforms on Friday took control of two airports on the Crimean peninsula — where the majority of people are ethnic Russians and many want to break away from the new government in Kiev.

Update at 5:15 p.m. ET: Obama Warns Russia On Ukraine

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Europe
3:21 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Upheaval In Ukraine Shifts To Crimea Peninsula

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 5:27 am

Armed men are patrolling two airports in the Ukrainian province of Crimea, and Ukraine's acting president is blaming Russia. Russia says its troops have nothing to do with it.

Parallels
1:25 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Secretary Of State Kerry Says Ukraine Is Not A 'Cold War Story'

An anti-Yanukovych protester walks past a barricade in Independence Square, the epicenter of the country's current unrest, in Kiev, Ukraine, on Wednesday.
Emilio Morenatti AP

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 8:49 am

Ukraine's ousted president, Viktor Yanukovych, emerged Friday to give a news conference on Russian soil, not far from the Ukraine border. Russia is not only giving Yanukovych shelter — it's also carrying out military exercises that have raised alarms in Washington.

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Parallels
3:24 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Idle No More: Japan Plans To Restart Closed Nuclear Reactors

Japan's draft of a new energy proposal calls for opening nuclear power plants that were shut down after the nuclear disaster in 2011.
Greg Webb/IAEA AP

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 5:57 pm

In the wake of the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima nuclear plant three years ago, Japan's government decided to phase out nuclear power. Other governments, notably Germany's, followed Japan's lead.

But Wednesday, Tokyo reversed course. It issued a draft energy plan that includes restarting idled nuclear reactors. Now, the energy issue looms large over Japan's efforts to stage a comeback from two decades of economic stagnation.

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Africa
3:24 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Jewels Lie Beneath The Violence In The Central African Republic

A villager holds diamonds dug out from a mine outside the village of Sam Ouandja in northeast Central African Republic in 2007.
David Lewis Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 6:08 pm

Morning Mass began with a hymn on a recent Sunday at the Infant Jesus Catholic Church in the Central African Republic town of Bouar. The Rev. Dominic Mbarta fretted about his sermon. The previous Sunday, when a Polish priest at the church simply asked the congregation to refrain from killing their Muslim neighbors or looting abandoned Muslim houses, the priest was threatened.

"They were so angry," Mbarta says. "They went back grumbling that the priest is not impartial. He is for the Muslims. He's not for the Christians."

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Middle East
2:44 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

A Greek Treasure Pulled From The Sea Disappears Again In Gaza

Last year, a Palestinian man fishing off the coast of the Gaza Strip discovered what is thought to be a 2,500-year-old bronze statue of the Greek god Apollo. The rare statue vanished from public view almost immediately after being pulled from the sea. The Hamas government in Gaza says it now has control of the statue.
APA Images/STR APA/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 5:57 pm

On a sunny Friday in August last year, Judah Abughorab paddled a small, flat boat over the blue Mediterranean Sea about 100 yards off the Gaza Strip's sandy shore.

He doesn't really like to eat fish, but catching them is the unemployed construction worker's favorite pastime.

That day, he netted a half a dozen. Then, through the clear water, he spotted something that made him look again.

"It looked like a person," he says. "Eyes, a face, hands, fingers."

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Africa
2:40 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Impatient With Change, Libyans Begin To Leave

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 5:57 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Three years ago, Libyans began a revolution that toppled the regime of Colonel Moammar Gadhafi. Today, their country still teeters between chaos and the emergence of a new state. Crime, violence and power outages are part of daily life in Libya. But many Libyans had had enough. And those with the money and contacts are getting out.

NPR's Leila Fadel talks to a businessman, a musician, and an activist about whether to stay or go.

NASER RAYES: (Foreign language spoken)

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Europe
2:40 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

With Billions In Looted Cash, What Ukrainian Politician Isn't Corrupt?

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 5:57 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Public outrage at corruption in Ukraine was a driving force behind the protests that lead to the ouster of President Yanukovych. Ukraine is considered among the most corrupt countries in the world. The transparency international index, which measures how corrupt the public sector is perceived to be, ranks Ukraine 144th out of 177 countries. Taras Kuzio joins me to talk about corruption in Ukraine.

He's with the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies at the University of Alberta. Welcome to the program.

TARAS KUZIO: Hi.

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