World News

Parallels
10:36 am
Thu May 21, 2015

Rome's Cinematic 'Dream Factory' Ramps Up Production Once Again

The famous chariot race in Ben-Hur was filmed on a movie set at Cinecittà in 1958.
AP

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 6:27 pm

It's just 15 miles south of Rome, but it looks more like ancient Jerusalem.

Welcome to the vast backlot at Cinecittà, the sprawling movie metropolis where the original Ben-Hur was filmed, and a remake is currently in production.

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The Two-Way
8:34 am
Thu May 21, 2015

Malaysia Orders Navy, Coast Guard To Rescue Rohingyas At Sea

A newly arrived Rohingya migrant uses a mirror after taking a shower at a temporary shelter in Bayeun, Aceh province, Indonesia, on Thursday.
Binsar Bakkara AP

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 6:08 pm

Malaysia's prime minister has ordered the navy and coast guard to search for stranded Rohingya migrants in the Andaman Sea, a day after Kuala Lumpur and Jakarta agreed to take boatloads of desperate refugees who have been in limbo for weeks since fleeing persecution in Myanmar.

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The Two-Way
6:40 am
Thu May 21, 2015

Fears Grow That ISIS Might Target Palmyra's Ancient Treasures

A photo released on Sunday by the Syrian official news agency SANA shows a general view of the ancient Roman city of Palmyra, northeast of Damascus, Syria. Fears have intensified that the self-declared Islamic State, which captured the city on Wednesday, might raze the ruins.
AP

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 10:52 am

Following the self-declared Islamic State's capture of Palmyra, concern today is turning to the security of the ancient Syrian city's archaeological sites and fears that the Islamist extremists might try to destroy them, as they have done elsewhere.

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Africa
5:46 am
Thu May 21, 2015

Freed From Boko Haram, Hostages Now Held By Nigeria's Military

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 7:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Middle East
4:32 am
Thu May 21, 2015

ISIS Takes Control Of Syria's Ancient City Of Palmyra

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 5:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Latin America
3:22 am
Thu May 21, 2015

U.S.: Venezuelan Officials Involved In Drug Trafficking, Money Laundering

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 5:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Venezuela's left-leaning government has been at odds with the U.S. for years.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Europe
3:09 am
Thu May 21, 2015

Revelations Of British Pedophile Ring Spur Flood Of Abuse Reports

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 5:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
3:07 am
Thu May 21, 2015

U.S. Engagment Against ISIS Can't Be Timid, Retired Marine General Says

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 5:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
1:42 am
Thu May 21, 2015

WHO Calls For $100 Million Emergency Fund, Doctor 'SWAT Team'

The Ebola outbreak "overwhelmed" the World Health Organization and made it clear the agency must change, WHO's director-general, Dr. Margaret Chan, said Monday in Geneva.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 6:00 pm

Nearly 3,000 delegates from around the world are gathering this week in one of the most expensive cities in Europe to debate the fate of the World Health Organization.

There's one main question on the table: Will the WHO be given the power and money it needs to be the world's leading health agency, or will it plod forward in its current state — as a weak, bureaucratic agency of the U.N. known more for providing advice than taking action.

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Asia
1:35 am
Thu May 21, 2015

Why A Chinese Government Think Tank Attacked American Scholars

The Dzungar army surrenders to Manchu officers of the Qing Dynasty in 1759 in the Ili Valley, now part of China's Xinjiang region, in this painting made several years later by Chinese and Jesuit missionary artists.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 4:23 am

Last month, a Chinese government think tank bashed history professors from Harvard, Georgetown and other leading American universities regarding things they wrote — at least 15 years ago — about events that occurred more than two centuries ago.

"This was a uniquely vitriolic attack," says Georgetown's Jim Millward. The article calls him as "arrogant," "overbearing" and an "imperialist," and dismisses Millward's and his colleagues' scholarship as "academically absurd."

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The Two-Way
5:33 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Islamic State Takes Control Of Ancient City Of Palmyra

Smoke rises after a Syrian Rocket launcher shell on Islamic State positions in the ancient oasis city of Palmyra, about 215 kilometers northeast of Damascus on Tuesday. News reports say the Islamic State has taken control of the city.
EPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 10:35 am

The self-declared Islamic State has taken control of Palmyra, an ancient city that's on UNESCO's list of World Heritage sites.

Palmyra and Tadmur, the modern town that adjoins it, have been the scene of recent fighting between Syrian government troops and fighters from the Islamic State. Multiple news reports say government troops left the city ahead of an advance by the rebels.

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Parallels
5:17 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

For Israel, Soccer Becomes A Geopolitical Football

FIFA President Sepp Blatter kicks a ball during the inauguration of a football stadium in the village of Dura al-Qari near the West Bank city of Ramallah on Wednesday. Blatter said he is on a "mission of peace" to resolve tensions between the Israeli and Palestinian soccer federations.
Majdi Mohammed AP

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 6:39 pm

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict has moved to the soccer field. Next week, at the annual meeting of FIFA — the international body governing football — its 209 members are scheduled to vote on a proposal to suspend Israel from international play.

Palestinian soccer officials put the proposal on FIFA's agenda, saying Israeli policies hurt Palestinian players and the sport's development and break FIFA's own rules.

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Middle East
3:34 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Netanyahu Cancels Palestinian-Only Bus Plan Just Before Scheduled Start

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 5:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Parallels
2:50 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Desperate Rohingya Granted Temporary Shelter. But What Next?

A fishing boat carrying Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants is pulled to shore by Achenese fishermen off the coast of Julok, in Indonesia's Aceh province, on Wednesday.
Antara Foto/Syifa Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 5:17 pm

The governments of Indonesia and Malaysia agreed Wednesday to allow boats full of thousands of migrants stranded at sea to come ashore.

The news came as Indonesian fishermen rescued more than 400 people from a boat that first made the news last week — and finally got governments to act.

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Iraq
2:37 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Fall Of Ramadi Highlights 'Fundamental Failure' Of U.S. Strategy In Iraq

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 5:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Movies
2:37 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

An Indian Master Returns To Cinemas, Restored

Subir Banerjee plays the young Apu in Pather Panchali, which made its New York debut 60 years ago this month.
Courtesy of Janus Films

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 6:19 am

In the crowded field of postwar cinema, Satyajit Ray broke through barriers of language and culture to become the most celebrated Indian filmmaker in the West.

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Goats and Soda
1:16 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

I'd Like To Buy The Emerging World A Coke

A woman walks past an ad for Coca-Cola in Bamako, the capital of the Republic of Mali.
New York Daily News Archive NY Daily News via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 2:13 pm

So who does drink the most soda in the world, anyway?

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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Wed May 20, 2015

U.S. Releases Documents Seized From Osama Bin Laden's Compound

Al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, seen in Afghanistan in this undated photo, was killed in 2011 during a U.S. raid on his compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan.
AP

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 12:28 pm

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

Intelligence officials on Wednesday released a trove of newly declassified documents, books and magazines found during the 2011 raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. They're calling it "Bin Laden's Bookshelf."

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The Two-Way
9:10 am
Wed May 20, 2015

Rare Black Rhino Killed By U.S. Hunter Who Won Controversial Auction

An endangered black rhino is seen in this file photo from the Etosha National Park in norhern Namibia last year. An American hunter has killed one of the animals, under a special permit he bought for $350,000. While the rhinoceros is referred to as black, its colors vary from shades of brown to gray.
Barbara Scheer DPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 3:03 pm

A Texas hunter who paid $350,000 for the right to hunt a rare black rhino in Namibia has killed the animal. The hunt has drawn controversy and spurred debate over the best way to manage endangered wildlife.

Corey Knowlton won an auction last January for a hunting permit that would allow him to kill a black rhino weighing around 3,000 pounds.

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Iraq
3:19 am
Wed May 20, 2015

Ramadi's Fall To ISIS Revives Questions About U.S. Strategy

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 3:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
1:25 am
Wed May 20, 2015

She's Got One Of The Toughest Diseases To Cure. And She's Hopeful

Jenny Tenorio Gallegos, 35, in Lima, Peru, is being treated for drug-resistant TB. The treatment lasts two years and may rob her of her hearing.
Jason Beaubien/NPR

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 12:44 pm

Drug-resistant tuberculosis is not only airborne and lethal; it's one of the most difficult diseases in the world to cure.

In Peru, 35-year-old Jenny Tenorio Gallegos wheezes even when she's sitting still. That's because of the damage tuberculosis has done to her lungs. The antibiotics she's taking to treat extensively drug-resistant TB nauseate her, give her headaches, leave her exhausted and are destroying her hearing.

"At times I don't hear well," she says. "You have to speak loud for me to be able to understand."

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Parallels
1:25 am
Wed May 20, 2015

Live On Pakistani TV: A Call-In Show About Sex

Dr. Nadim Uddin Siddiqui hosts a weekly call-in show about sexual issues on a Pakistani cable television channel. The program, Clinic Online, is a rarity for a conservative Muslim nation, but has proved popular, particularly among women.
Abdul Sattar NPR

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 10:09 am

It's long been assumed that, in conservative Islamic societies, sex is a subject to be spoken about, if it's discussed at all, in guilty whispers.

Yet, for many months now, women in Pakistan have been dialing in to a TV show to ask about profoundly personal issues — live on air.

"I have to talk about my husband," said a woman who gave her name as Sonia on one of the show's recent editions. "His sperm count is very low ..."

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Goats and Soda
4:14 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Home-Brewed Morphine Is Around The Corner

Families harvest poppy bulbs in the Badakhshan province of Afghanistan. To collect the opium, they score the bulbs and let the milky substance ooze out. The dried residue contains about 10 percent morphine.
David Guttenfelder AP/National Geographic

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 7:09 pm

Making morphine — or heroin*, for that matter — isn't easy. You have to know a bunch of fancy chemistry to synthesize the drug from scratch. Or you have to get your hands on some opium poppies and extract morphine from the flowers' milky juice.

The latter is tougher than it sounds. Sure, the beautiful flowers grow across millions of acres around the world. But farming and trading poppies are tightly regulated both by laws and by drug kingpins.

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Parallels
4:14 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

After A Big Victory For ISIS, Iraqi Forces Look To Regroup

A car is engulfed by flames during clashes in Ramadi on Saturday. Islamic State militants drove Iraqi security forces out of the city, which is just 70 miles west of Baghdad.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:06 pm

The black flag of the self-proclaimed Islamic State is flying over the Iraqi city of Ramadi after government forces collapsed and the extremists seized control over the weekend.

Thousands of civilians have fled Ramadi and those left behind face a chaotic situation.

"No food, no fuel, no electricity. It's very difficult there," says Sheikh Hekmat Suleiman, an adviser to the governor of Anbar Province. Ramadi is the provincial capital, and the local government has now fled the city, just 70 miles west of Baghdad.

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National Security
2:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Fall Of Ramadi Sparks New Criticism Over U.S. Strategy In Iraq

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We're joined now by NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman. And Tom, we just heard in Alice's report that Shiite militias are the units looking to help retake the city of Ramadi. Is that something the U.S. government would support?

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Business
2:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Takata Expands Airbag Recall To Nearly 34 Million Vehicles

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And now to the largest auto recall in U.S. history. The Japanese company Takata is doubling its airbag recall from 17 million to now nearly 34 million. NPR's Jason Margolis reports.

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Middle East
2:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Journalist Austin Tice Still Missing In Syria After More Than 1,000 Days

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
2:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Eyes In The Sky: Foam Drones Keep Watch On Rain Forest Trees

A man and his drone: Carlos Casteneda of the Amazon Basin Conservation Association prepares to launch one of his plastic foam planes.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:46 pm

A couple of toy planes are out to catch illegal loggers and miners in the Amazon.

It's an awesome responsibility.

Every year, illegal logging and mining in the Peruvian Amazon destroy tens of thousands of acres of rain forest. The deforestation in remote parts of the jungle is difficult to detect while it's going on.

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Goats and Soda
2:08 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

A 10-Year-Old Makes A Video So We 'Don't Forget Nepal'

Lucas met this woman who lost her home and all her children except for one daughter.
Donatella Lorch for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 2:53 pm

Like mother, like son.

Lucas Zutt is the 10-year-old son of journalist Donatella Lorch, who frequently contributes to Goats and Soda. They've lived in Kathmandu since June 2013.

Lucas shared his impressions of the earthquake with NPR after it struck. And now he's made a video.

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The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Takata Agrees To Declare Air Bags Defective In Nearly 34M Vehicles

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 2:05 pm

Updated at 3:13 p.m. ET

Japanese air bag supplier Takata says nearly 34 million vehicles were fitted with its defective inflator mechanisms, doubling the number of vehicles affected in the U.S., the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Tuesday.

The recall is believed to be the largest in NHTSA's history.

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