World News

Food
9:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

'Beer Culture' Revered As Belgium's Heritage

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 8:23 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Sports
9:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

After Scandal, Barcelona Football Club Banned From Trades

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 11:49 am

The Barcelona soccer club has been banned from trading for 14 months for signing overseas players under 18 years old, against FIFA rules. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with soccer reporter Ashish Sharma.

Remembrances
9:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

AP Photographer Killed In Afghanistan Was Full Of Laughter

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 11:49 am

Anja Niedringhaus was killed last week in an attack by an Afghan police commander. She was in Khost province covering the run-up to Saturday's presidential election.

Europe
9:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Both Sides Dig In Their Heels Over Crimea Crisis

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 11:49 am

Ukraine shares a long history with Russia, but the latest crisis is driving a wedge between the two countries and reinforcing a sense of national identity among many Ukrainians.

Africa
9:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

20 Years Later, Rwanda Hopes To Be A 'Light For The World'

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 11:49 am

Rwandan President Paul Kagame is working to transform the legacy of hatred, 20 years after the genocide. The new generation is being taught to find a common purpose in reconstructing Rwanda.

Asia
9:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Japan Releases Inmate After Nearly A Half-Century On Death Row

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 11:49 am

A court in Japan recently released Iwao Hakamada, thought to be the world's longest-serving death row inmate. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with David Johnson, an expert on Japan's legal system.

Europe
3:12 pm
Sat April 5, 2014

Cleaning Around Barricades, Kiev Protesters Still Camping In Square

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 4:19 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

In the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, hundreds of people are still camped out in Independence Square known as the Maidan. They say they'll stay, at least through next month's presidential elections, to push for greater reform. In February, violent protests in the Maidan toppled the president and left dozens dead. Today, though, the cloud of black dust over the square was from dozens of brooms sweeping. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports.

Read more
Afghanistan
3:12 pm
Sat April 5, 2014

Afghans Defy Threats To Pick A President

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 4:19 pm

Despite warnings from the Taliban that they would disrupt the poll with violence, voter turnout in Afghanistan has been good and the day mostly peaceful. NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with reporter Sean Carberry about the presidential elections.

The Two-Way
10:29 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Ban On Stores' Late Hours Is Lawful, French Court Says

The Paris Sephora store, seen here on a night last fall night on the Champs-Elysees, must close at 9 p.m., a high court has ruled. The cosmetics chain had required workers to keep the store open until midnight.
Kenzo Tribouillard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 7:53 am

France's ban keeping stores from being open late at night does not run afoul of the country's constitution, a top court has ruled. Cosmetics retailer Sephora had hoped to keep its flagship Paris store open until midnight. Instead, the shop must observe the traditional closing time of 9 p.m., according to the ruling.

Read more
Africa
9:46 am
Sat April 5, 2014

'Hotel Rwanda' Manager: We've Failed To Learn From History

Paul Rusesabagina, who sheltered more than 1,000 people in his hotel during the Rwandan genocide, says the brutal violence in Syria, the Central African Republic and the Congo shows history repeats itself while people fail to learn from it.
Courtesy Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 11:38 am

Paul Rusesabagina is a figure from history — a terrible history.

He was the manager of the Diplomat Hotel in Kigali, Rwanda, 20 years ago, when the genocide of Rwanda's Tutsi people began. More than 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus would be killed in just three months.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:40 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Chinese Ship Reportedly Detects 'Pulse Signal' In Search For Airliner

A map shows the location of a pulse signal that was reportedly detected by a Chinese patrol ship searching for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. China's state-run media says the signal is being investigated as a possible clue to the missing airliner's final location.
Google Maps

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 9:59 am

A Chinese Coast Guard ship has detected an ultrasonic pulse on a frequency used by black box recorders, according to China's state news agency, fueling new hope that searchers might be closing in on a beacon from the Malaysia Airlines jetliner that vanished weeks ago. The ship found the pulse signal in the south Indian Ocean, Xinhua says.

Read more
Middle East
5:52 am
Sat April 5, 2014

For Syrian Refugees, 'Life Has Stopped'

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 9:18 am

Syrian refugees have flooded into Lebanon since the war began. The UN said this week that 1 million refugees are now in the country. NPR's Scott Simon and Alice Fordham discuss the impact.

Afghanistan
5:52 am
Sat April 5, 2014

With Modern Election, Voters Make A Break From Old Afghanistan

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 9:18 am

Afghans voted for a new president Saturday, with only scattered violence. NPR'S Renee Montagne tells NPR's Scott Simon that the vote reflects the country's tug between tradition and modernity.

Afghanistan
5:52 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Afghans Vote In Large Numbers Despite Risks

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 9:18 am

After a campaign marred by violence, Afghans voted Saturday in presidential elections for what's to be the first ever democratic transfer of power. Results are not expected for some time.

World
3:45 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Taunt Or Miscalculation? Iran's Provocative Pick For U.N. Envoy

Iranian students climb over the wall of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran during the Iranian Revolution, Nov. 4, 1979. The students went on to seize the embassy staff, and hold 52 of them as hostages for 444 days.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 9:18 am

Iran's reported decision to name Hamid Aboutalebi as its ambassador to the United Nations has ignited anger in the U.S. That's because the diplomat was part of the student group that held Americans hostage in 1979. Now, dozens of lawmakers are urging the Obama administration to deny him a visa.

It's the latest sign of just how difficult it will be for Washington and Tehran to overcome decades of mistrust.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:33 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Defying Taliban Threats, Afghans Vote For Next Leader

Long lines were seen at almost every polling station around Kabul Saturday, despite heavy rain and security threats.
David P Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 10:31 am

  • Afghan Election: NPR's Sean Carberry Reports From Kabul

Millions of Afghans lined up to vote for a new president Saturday, despite warnings of violence from the Taliban.

Saturday's historic vote begins what would be the first democratic transfer of power for Afghanistan; President Hamid Karzai has served for two terms and is not allowed to run for a third under the country's constitution.

The Taliban launched a number of attacks that killed dozens in the weeks before the election, but no major violence was reported after polls opened Saturday.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

McDonald's Shuts Its Restaurants In Crimea

The McDonald's fast food restaurant in Sevastopol, Crimea, in a photograph taken on Friday.
Anton Pedko EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 4:21 pm

McDonald's, citing the "evolving situation" in Crimea, said Friday it was closing its three restaurants on the Black Sea peninsula, but the move has prompted one prominent Moscow politician to call for the fast-food giant to be booted from all of Russia.

"Due to operational reasons beyond our control, McDonald's has taken the decision to temporarily close our three restaurants in Simferopol, Sevastopol and Yalta," a spokeswoman said.

Read more
Europe
2:17 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

As Pressures Mount On Putin, Analysts Wonder What He Hopes To Gain

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 4:18 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

U.S.-Russia relations have deteriorated since Russia's annexation of Crimea and there are still questions over Russian President Vladimir Putin's agenda in Ukraine and Eastern Europe. Targeted sanctions, political isolation and NATO's plans to beef up its presence in Eastern Europe haven't persuaded Putin to change course.

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson has more from Moscow.

Read more
Afghanistan
2:17 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Between Afghans And Political Milestone, Threat Of Violence Looms

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 4:18 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

To Afghanistan now, where tomorrow voters will choose a successor to President Hamid Karzai who was barred from running again. The election will mark the country's first democratic transition of power. The Taliban have been calling the election a Western-backed sham and have been waging a campaign of violence to disrupt the vote.

Read more
Economy
2:17 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Mystery Of Mounting Inequality Might Find Answer In Brand-New Tome

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 4:18 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A few decades ago, inequality started rising in countries around the world. That came as a shock to many economists who originally thought inequality tended to go down overtime. They wondered how inequality could rise in so many different places at once. Well, now a new book by one of the world's leading experts on the topic suggests an answer to that mystery. Jacob Goldstein of our Planet Money team reports.

JACOB GOLDSTEIN, BYLINE: The book is called "Capital in the Twenty-First Century." Here's the author.

Read more
Parallels
1:24 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

U.S. Taps New Energy Sources, And Potential Geopolitical Clout

Gas and oil extraction using hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is at the heart of the recent U.S. oil and gas boom. Here, an oil field on the Monterey Shale formation in McKittrick, Calif.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 4:18 pm

The recent oil and natural gas boom in the U.S. is paying major dividends for Washington's geopolitical clout. Thanks to hydraulic fracturing, the U.S. is awash in domestic energy, which is having a ripple effect globally.

If you want to gauge one effect of this newfound energy wealth, you don't have to look any further than the current crisis between Russia and Ukraine, says Michael Levi, a senior fellow for energy and the environment at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:16 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Kerry: 'Reality Check Time' In Middle East Peace Talks

Secretary of State John Kerry speaks at a news conference with Moroccan Foreign Minister Salaheddine Mezouar following a bilateral strategic dialogue at the Foreign Ministry in Rabat, on Friday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 3:52 pm

Frustrated by obstacles encountered in talks between Israel and the Palestinians, Secretary of State John Kerry said Friday that the White House was re-evaluating its role in the process, and that the time had come for a "reality check."

Speaking at a news conference in Rabat, Morocco, Kerry said the dialogue that the U.S. has been mediating is "not an open-ended effort, it never has been.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:14 am
Fri April 4, 2014

India Sentences 3 To Hang For Multiple Rapes

Mohammad Qasim Shaikh (right) and another accused in a gang rape case are taken to a court session last month in Mumbai.
Divyakant Solanki EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 1:11 pm

A court in India has sentenced three convicted rapists to death by hanging under a new law that seeks to crack down on attacks on women in the country.

According to Al-Jazeera, "The men are the first to be tried and convicted under a recently revised law that carries the death penalty for those convicted of multiple sexual assaults."

The news agency says:

Read more
Faith Matters
10:31 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Finding Peace After Genocide

It has been 20 years since the start of the Rwandan genocide. Reverend Celestin Musekura lost congregation members in the bloodshed. He discusses how faith has helped foster reconciliation.

Parallels
8:58 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Two Brave Journalists In Afghanistan

Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus, shown here in 2005, was killed Friday in Khost, Afghanistan. AP reporter Kathy Gannon was injured. Both have covered Afghanistan for many years.
Peter Dejong AP

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 12:54 pm

Anja Niedringhaus was a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer. Kathy Gannon has covered Afghanistan for more than 25 years, longer than any other Western reporter.

Read more
Europe
4:36 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Ukrainians Disagree Over Sniper Inquiry

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 6:22 am

A Ukrainian police medic and a protester differ over whether their country should probe who committed crimes during February's violence in Kiev.

Europe
4:33 am
Fri April 4, 2014

After Crimea Takeover, Ukraine Moves To Protect Odessa

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 6:22 am

With the Crimean peninsula effectively controlled by Russia, Ukrainian officials worry about another Black Sea port, Odessa. Ukraine fears this area with a Russian minority could be a tempting target.

Afghanistan
2:59 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Backroom Intrigue Persists In Afghan Presidential Election

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 6:22 am

Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne is in Afghanistan following the leading candidates in Saturday's presidential election. The top-two contenders are: Zalmai Rassoul and Abdullah Abdullah.

NPR Story
2:59 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Arcane Chinese Holiday Honors Integrity Before Personal Gain

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 6:22 am

Cold Food Day in China commemorates a hermit who 2,600 years ago refused wealth and power. His ruler tried to smoke him out of his mountain hideout, but ended up burning him to a death.

Middle East
2:02 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Two Israeli Settlers Speak Of Life — And Plans — On Disputed Land

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:34 pm

From the Palestinian perspective, a big obstacle to peace is the presence of 350,000 Israelis on land expected to be part of any future Palestinian state. Two of those settlers offer their viewpoints.

Pages