World News

Animals
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

Rhino Horns Fuel Deadly, Intercontinental Trade

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 4:55 am

NPR's Frank Langfitt and Gregory Warner have teamed up for a series about how myth and money are driving extraordinary slaughter of rhinos. They talk with host Rachel Martin about the issue, which has repercussions from the African continent all the way to Asia.

The Changing Lives Of Women
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

C-Sections Deliver Cachet For Wealthy Brazilian Women

Daniele Coelho holds her newborn daughter as doctors finish her cesarean section at the Perinatal Clinic in Rio de Janeiro on Aug. 2. Brazil has one of the world's highest rates of cesarean births.
Felipe Dana AP

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 5:11 pm

The office is immaculate, as you would expect in an upscale neighborhood in Sao Paulo — all sterile, white, modish plastic furniture and green plants. Behind the reception desk are pictures that would look more appropriate in a pop art gallery than a private maternity clinic.

The list of services at the clinic in Brazil's largest city is long: fertility treatments, specialized gynecology and, of course, obstetrics. But one thing they rarely do here is preside over a vaginal delivery.

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Experts Marvel At How Cyber Thieves Stole $45 Million

This week's massive cyber-heist was facilitated by the ease with which criminals have learned to hack the magnetic stripe on the back of ATM, debit and credit cards.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 5:00 pm

With a haul of $45 million, it's being billed as possibly the biggest cyber-heist in history. But in reality, experts and authorities say, it was thousands of small but highly coordinated thefts.

As we reported on Thursday, federal prosecutors charged eight people with being the just New York cell of an operation that allegedly encompassed criminal cohorts in 26 countries.

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The Two-Way
8:11 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Pakistanis 'Defy Violence' To Vote In Landmark Election

Pakistani men lined up to vote in Rawalpindi on Saturday. Men and women cast ballots separately as millions went to the poll.
T. Mughal EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 9:17 pm

Despite attacks in the days and weeks leading up to Saturday's voting — and deadly bombings and other attacks on the very day they're going to the polls — Pakistanis are showing they're willing to "defy the violence," NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from Lahore.

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NPR Story
3:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

How Hard Would It Be To Impose A No-Fly Zone In Syria?

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 8:11 am

So called no-fly zones have worked in the past, not always to change regimes but to help protect those trying to overthrow their government. Host Scott Simon talks with Kevin Baron of Foreign Policy Magazine's E-Ring blog about the possible imposition by the U.S. of such a zone in Syria.

NPR Story
3:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

What It's Like To Work In A Bangladeshi Factory

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Diplomats Hope Syrian Rebels' Losses Promote Collaboration

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 8:11 am

Syrian rebels are on the defensive these days, losing ground to new offensives by government troops. Western diplomats are hopeful the rebel losses will persuade their leaders to attend an international conference being organized by the U.S. and Russia to chart a path to peace in the blood-soaked country. Host Scott Simon speaks with NPR's Deb Amos.

NPR Story
3:29 am
Sat May 11, 2013

The Philosophy, Economics Behind Sourcing Retail

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And the deaths in Bangladesh have prompted a number of American clothing companies to disclose where their products are made. Everlane is an online clothing retailer based in San Francisco that has always done that. Michael Preysman is the CEO and founder of Everlane, and we asked him where and how his company's T-shirts are manufactured.

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The Salt
3:29 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Tiny Mites Spark Big Battle Over Imports Of French Cheese

Microscopic bugs called cheese mites are responsible for giving Mimolette its distinctive rind and flavor.
Chris Waits via Flickr

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 1:28 pm

The Food and Drug Administration is currently embroiled in a surprisingly heated culinary standoff — pitting French cheese-makers (and American cheese-lovers) against regulators, all because of one very small problem: cheese mites.

Cheese mites are microscopic little bugs that live on the surfaces of aged cheeses, munching the microscopic molds that grow there. For many aged cheeses, they're something of an industry nuisance, gently brushed off the cheeses. But for Mimolette, a bright orange French cheese, they're actually encouraged.

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Africa
3:29 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Media Focus On Ailing Mandela Is Not 'The African Way'

Congregants pray in front of a stained-glass window depicting South African statesman Nelson Mandela during Easter services at Regina Mundi Catholic Church in the Soweto of Johannesburg, South Africa, March 3. The church held prayers for Mandela, 94, who was in the hospital at the time.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 8:11 am

It's almost impossible these days to switch on South African radio or television, or read a local newspaper, website or tweet, and not hear Nelson Mandela's name mentioned.

Friday marked the 19th anniversary of Mandela's inauguration as South Africa's first democratically elected — and first black — president, four years after he was released from prison.

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Animals
3:29 am
Sat May 11, 2013

To Count Elephants In The Forest, Watch Where You Step

Elephants gather at dusk to drink at a watering hole in Kenya.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 9:37 am

Imagine you're flying in a two-seater plane over Africa, and, in an effort to see how elephants are faring, your job is to count all the ones you see. Over the savannah, that's easy. But how do you peer into the forests, where all you see is treetops?

For years, the zoologists who tried to do this just guessed. But in the late 1980s, conservationist Richard Barnes devised a method to take an elephant census in the densest of forests.

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NPR Story
3:29 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Kerry's Agenda: Priorities Emerge With Travel

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 6:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The U.S. Secretary of State, John Kerry, has been in the Middle East, Rome and Russia this week trying to find some kind of diplomatic end to Syria's civil war. He's also been trying to revive Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. Mr. Kerry has been the U.S. secretary of state for just over 100 days, spending more than a third of that time overseas.

NPR's Michele Kelemen reports on how his tenure at the State Department seems to be shaping up.

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National Security
3:45 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Benghazi Investigator Reacts To Criticism Of His Report

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. At congressional hearings this week, three witnesses introduced as State Department whistleblowers criticized the administration's handling of last September's assault on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya. That attack claimed the life of United States Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

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Middle East
3:45 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

With Rebels In Disarray, Syrian Regime Appears Confident

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 5:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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Commentary
3:45 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Week In Politics: Immigration & Benghazi

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 5:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This week, the Senate Judiciary Committee began marking up an immigration bill. We used to speak of immigration reform, but in recent years it's become circumspect to say overhaul, which is presumably more neutral. Our Friday political commentators don't seem especially neutral about the issue. E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and the Brookings Institution, good to see you here.

E.J. DIONNE: Good to see you.

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Politics
3:45 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Two Years In, A Look At Obama's Syrian Civil War Record

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 5:25 pm

Syria's civil war is becoming the defining foreign policy challenge of President Obama's second term.

The Two-Way
3:27 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

White House Denies Any 'Substantive' Edits To Benghazi Memo

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice speaks to the media during a visit to Benghazi in 2011.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 4:07 pm

The White House says it made only minimal changes to the now-discredited talking points used to discuss the deadly attack last year on a U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya.

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The Salt
2:59 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

How Swedish Malort Became Chicago's Mascot Bitter Drink

World Shattered, a cocktail by Tyler Fry of the Chicago bar The Violet Hour. The drink includes R. Franklin's Original Recipe Malort, and tames the bitterness with lemon, honey syrup, raspberry and mint.
Courtesy of Eden Laurin

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 4:43 pm

The people who make Jeppson's Malort, a harshly bitter spirit that's consumed in shots or cocktails, don't mind that their product makes people grimace. Instead, they celebrate it.

Carl Jeppson Co., a Chicago company, has built a minor social media empire around malort's "brutal" flavor; one winner of its slogan contest described the drink as "turning taste buds into taste foes for generations."

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The Two-Way
2:37 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Celebrity Panda To Return To Thailand, For $1 Million A Year

The giant panda Lin Ping, a star in Thailand whose mandatory trip to China was due at the end of May, can spend up to 15 years in Thailand, under a deal announced this week. The 43-day-old Lin Ping was held by her mother, Lin Hui, in this 2009 photo.
Wichai Taprieu AP

The citizens of Thailand are breathing a sigh of relief, after a breakthrough moment in panda relations was reached with China Friday. After much negotiation, Lin Ping, a female giant panda who became a reality TV star after being born in Thailand's Chiang Mai Zoo, will be allowed to stay in Thailand for 15 years.

The pact comes just weeks before Lin Ping was to travel to China; under the terms of the deal that brought her parents to Thailand, zoo officials were obligated to send Lin Ping to China by her fourth birthday, on May 27.

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Will Imran Khan Shake Up Pakistani Politics This Time?

A supporter greets Imran Khan at a campaign rally on May 6, in Multan, Pakistan. Pakistan's parliamentary elections will be held on Saturday, and Khan's party is hoping the large, enthusiastic crowds at rallies will translate into a strong showing at the polls.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 12:38 pm

After retiring as Pakistan's most celebrated cricket player, Imran Khan has dabbled on the margins of Pakistani politics for nearly two decades, trying to make a mark.

The sportsman turned philanthropist who led a playboy lifestyle in his younger days has attracted endless media attention, but until now neither he nor his movement has had any real impact.

As Pakistanis vote in a crucial parliamentary election on Saturday, could this time be different?

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The Salt
9:49 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Sago, An Ancient Chinese Starch, Endures In Asian Cooking

Pearls made from sago starch are common ingredients in Asian desserts and savories.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 1:14 pm

Long before rice became the mainstay of Asia, prehistoric people in China turned to sago palm for starch.

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Politics
9:25 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Like 'Lazarus,' Mark Sanford Returns To Office

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, even for devoted Christians reading every word of the bible may be a once in a lifetime challenge. In a minute, we'll hear from a man who decided to copy the entire book by hand. And he tells us he's not even particularly religious. We'll think you'll be intrigued by what he has to say in a few minutes.

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The Two-Way
5:09 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Reports: Survivor Rescued 17 Days After Bangladesh Building Collapse

Rescuers carry a survivor who was buried for 17 days under the rubble of a building that collapsed in Saver, near Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Parvez Ahmad Rony AP

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:25 am

(Most recent update: 1:15 p.m. ET.)

There's incredible news from Bangladesh:

"Miraculous as it may sound," a survivor was rescued Friday from the rubble of the eight-story building that collapsed 17 days ago near Dhaka, The Daily Star reported this morning.

That story from Bangladesh's English-language newspaper has been followed with these bulletins from other news outlets:

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Asia
4:26 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Is Pakistan's Army Ready To See Democracy Take Hold?

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:10 am

Pakistan holds elections this weekend. It's a milestone, as the balloting takes place as an elected civilian government finishes its entire five-year term. That's the first time that's ever happened. Steve Inskeep talks to Shuja Nawaz, director of the Atlantic Council, and the author of Crossed Swords: Pakistan, Its Army, and the Wars Within.

Around the Nation
3:55 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Former Air Force Pilot Has Cautionary Tales About Drones

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:10 am

Congressional hearings are beginning to shine a light on the drone program that for the past 12 years has been cloaked in secrecy. NPR's Kelly McEvers talked to a former Air Force pilot who operated drones for several years.

Middle East
3:43 am
Fri May 10, 2013

U.S. Point Man On Syria Meets With Rebels Inside Syria

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Business
3:50 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Bangladesh's Powerful Garment Sector Fends Off Regulation

Garment workers sew T-shirts at a factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in 2009. Bangladesh, the world's second-largest clothing exporter, has lured clothing makers through a combination of low wages and light regulation.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 3:41 pm

Eight people died Wednesday in a fire at a Bangladeshi sweater factory. This follows the much deadlier collapse of the Rana Plaza building, where more than 900 people died.

The deaths are taking place in a garment sector that has seen explosive growth over the past three decades. The country has managed to lure clothing-makers through a combination of low wages and light regulation.

As a manufacturing center, Bangladesh has little to recommend it. The roads are poor. There's no port to speak of. The electricity is notoriously unreliable. It's politically unstable.

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The Two-Way
3:18 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Top U.S. Official Meets With Rebels Inside Syria

Robert Ford, the State Department's point man on Syria policy, appears before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on April 11.
Michael Reynolds EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 3:34 pm

Ambassador Robert Ford, the State Department's point man on Syrian policy, crossed into northern Syria on Wednesday. The secret visit was confirmed by Syrian activists at the media office at the Bab al-Salama crossing on the Turkish frontier.

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Asia
3:12 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Pakistani Women Still Struggle For A Voice In Politics

One of the few women competing in Pakistan's parliamentary election on Saturday is Naz Baloch, 33, a first-time candidate. She's the daughter of a politician, but is running for a different party than her father.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 3:41 pm

Flags of the competing political parties whip in the wind of seaside Karachi. But little else is stirring in this city of 18 million this day.

The MQM, a leading political party in the megacity, has shut Karachi down with a general strike in response to a deadly bombing at its election office. But as soon as the strike ends, the streets spring to life as if nothing were amiss.

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The Salt
2:22 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Samoans Await The Return Of The Tasty Turkey Tail

A chef in the kitchen of NPR headquarters prepares turkey tails.
Art Silverman/NPR

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 10:04 am

This is the tale of turkey tail — it's convoluted arrival, disappearance and highly anticipated return to the Pacific island the Republic of Samoa (not to be confused with American Samoa).

It's hard to pinpoint precisely when turkey tails started being imported into Samoa from the U.S. and when they became a favorite, affordable dish. Meat byproducts (Spam and fatty lamb cuts from New Zealand) started showing up sometime after World War II, and turkey tails came shortly thereafter.

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