World News

NPR Story
3:43 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Chinese Police Clamp Down On Protesters After Worker's Death

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 5:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Chinese security forces are patrolling the streets of southern Beijing today in great numbers, apparently to try and send a message to protesters. This follows a large demonstration yesterday at a shopping mall in the southern part of the capital, where protesters accused police of mishandling an investigation into the death of a 22-year-old migrant woman who worked there. It is just the latest example of mass unrest in China, and with each incident, police presence seems to be growing.

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The Two-Way
4:55 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Death Toll Tops 800 In Bangladesh Factory Collapse

Bangladeshi rescue and army personnel on Wednesday continue recovery operations at the site of the building collapse near Dhaka.
Munir Uz Zaman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 7:19 am

Authorities in Bangladesh say the death toll in last month's collapse of an eight-story garment factory complex has surpassed 800 as dozens more bodies were pulled from the rubble on Wednesday.

The latest corpses to be recovered were so badly decomposed that they were being sent to a lab for DNA identification, police said, according to The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
4:44 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Scientist Stephen Hawking To Boycott Israeli Conference

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 6:28 am

British physicist Stephen Hawking has stepped into a political black hole.

He announced this week that he was withdrawing from a conference in Israel to protest that country's treatment of Palestinians, throwing his weight behind an academic boycott of the Jewish state. The Guardian reports:

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Africa
2:50 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

U.S. Diplomat Reports Little Help During Benghazi Attacks

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 3:55 pm

A congressional committee on Wednesday heard testimony from three witnesses about the events that led to deaths of four Americans at Benghazi in September, 2012. The Benghazi attack has become a political controversy — Republicans accuse the Obama administration of mishandling security there and of misleading the American public after the attack. One new allegation: that a four-person team set to deploy to Benghazi the night of the attack was told not to go.

The Two-Way
2:38 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Witnesses Relate Frustration Over Response To Benghazi Attack

Gregory Hicks testifies Wednesday about the Benghazi attack before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, while Mark Thompson, left, and Eric Nordstrom, listen.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 3:56 pm

Three witnesses billed as whistle-blowers appeared before a House committee Wednesday to challenge the Obama administration's explanation of what transpired on Sept. 11, 2012, as the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, was attacked and the ambassador and three others killed.

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The Two-Way
1:15 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Several Dead After Ship Crashes Into Dock In Italy

Rescuers search what is left of the control tower of the port of Genoa, northern Italy, on Tuesday.
Francesco Pecoraro Associated Press

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 1:42 pm

A cargo ship slammed into a dock in Genoa, Italy, on Wednesday, killing at least seven people and toppling the control tower at one of the country's busiest ports.

The Associated Press reports that divers had found seven bodies in the wreckage. Four others have been hospitalized and two were still unaccounted for, Luca Cari, a spokesman for the fire rescue teams at the scene, told The Associated Press.

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The Salt
10:37 am
Wed May 8, 2013

With Warming Climes, How Long Will A Bordeaux Be A Bordeaux?

A worker harvests cabernet sauvignon grapes at a vineyard near Bordeaux, France, in September.
Caroline Blumberg EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 1:25 pm

Bordeauxs and Burgundys haven't changed much since the days when famous wine-lover Thomas Jefferson kept the cellars of his Parisian home well-stocked with both wines.

But now, some worry that the regional rules and traditions that have defined top winemaking regions like Champagne, Burgundy and Chianti for centuries could melt away as climate change takes effect.

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Europe
9:37 am
Wed May 8, 2013

In France, A Renewed Push To Return Art Looted By Nazis

A photo taken by the Nazis during World War II shows a room filled with stolen art at the Jeu de Paume museum in Paris. Using improved technology and the Internet, the French government is making a renewed push to track down the rightful owners of art looted by the Nazis.
Courtesy of Archives des Musees Nationaux A Paris

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 7:55 pm

During World War II, the Nazis plundered tens of thousands of works of art from the private collections of European Jews, many living in France. About 75 percent of the artwork that came back to France from Germany at the end of the war has been returned to their rightful owners.

But there are still approximately 2,000 art objects that remain unclaimed. The French government has now begun one of its most extensive efforts ever to find the heirs and return the art.

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The Two-Way
9:12 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Kurdish Militants Begin Historic Withdrawal From Turkey

Today marks the beginning of the pullback of thousands of militant PKK fighters from Turkey back to Kurdish-controlled northern Iraq. It's an important milestone in a delicate effort to end nearly three decades of bloodshed that have killed an estimated 35,000 people since 1984.

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The Two-Way
9:08 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Alex Ferguson: A Legendary Manager For An Iconic Franchise

Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson celebrates after his team wins the English Premier League at Blackburn, England, on May 14, 2011.
Tim Hales AP

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 3:55 pm

The resignation of veteran Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson is an event causing ripples that go way beyond the island where the Scotsman spent his long and illustrious career.

Walk into a bar pretty much anywhere from Buenos Aires to Bangkok, mention Ferguson or his star-studded team of Red Devils, and you can be sure of a lively conversation — and perhaps a heated argument.

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The Two-Way
7:47 am
Wed May 8, 2013

'Do Me A Solid,' Diplomat Rodman Says To North Korea's Kim

Dennis Rodman, in black hat and shades, with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at a Feb. 28 basketball game in Pyongyang.
KCNA EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 10:52 am

America's unlikeliest link to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has reached out to his friend in a bid to have an American citizen released from one of the communist nation's notorious labor camps.

"I'm calling on the Supreme Leader of North Korea or as I call him 'Kim', to do me a solid and cut Kenneth Bae loose," former basketball star Dennis Rodman tweets.

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Asia
4:08 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Violence Mutes Campaigning Ahead Of Pakistani Elections

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 9:43 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep, good morning.

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World
4:08 am
Wed May 8, 2013

PKK Fighters Begin To Withdraw From Northern Iraq

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 9:43 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's turn to a conflict now, that has been simmering for three decades. Turkish forces have spent years battling militants from the Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK as it's known. Today, thousands of PKK fighters begin a withdrawal to northern Iraq and this could lead to the group's eventual disarmament. Despite entrenched animosity, both Turks and Kurds seem, so far, to be pushing ahead with a peace process.

For Istanbul, here's NPR's Peter Kenyon.

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Europe
4:08 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Europe Worries Young People Are Going Aboard to Seek Jihad

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 9:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Authorities in Europe are concerned about their countries being used as incubators for terrorist attacks. You will recall that some 9/11 attackers had lived in Germany. Two Boston Marathon bombing suspects had links to Russia. Even peaceful Belgium is now asking just who's living there and what they do when they go abroad. Teri Shultz reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNFIRE)

TERI SHULTZ, BYLINE: Members of the al-Qaida-linked al-Nusra Front in Syria exchange words amid gunfire and alarm a nation far away from the warzone.

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Afghanistan
12:55 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Afghans Confront Senstive Issue Of Ethnicity

Saifulzul Husseini (right) works in Dashti Barchi, a Hazara neighborhood of Kabul. He believes that ethnicity should be listed on the new identity card.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 9:43 am

In Afghanistan, where most people are illiterate and live in areas without paved roads or regular electricity, a state-of-the-art smart-chip ID card may seem extravagant. But the government believes it can help with everything from census data to voter registration to health care.

The format of the proposed card, however, is fueling debate over ethnicity and identity at a time when anxiety is already high over the drawdown of NATO troops.

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The Salt
12:50 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Rat 'Mutton' And Bird Flu: Strange Days For Meat Eaters In Shanghai

A woman wearing a mask rides past a KFC restaurant in Shanghai last month. Food scares and the bird flu haven't stopped many chicken lovers in the city from visiting KFC and other restaurants.
Aly Song Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 9:43 am

The past couple of months have been unsettling ones for meat eaters in Shanghai.

In March, more than 16,000 dead pigs showed up in a stretch of the Huangpu River — a main source of the city's drinking water.

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Shots - Health News
12:49 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Officials Prepare For Another Flu Pandemic — Just In Case

Scientists in the U.S. are growing the H7N9 virus in the laboratory to help with vaccine development.
James Gathany CDC/Douglas E. Jordan

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 9:43 am

There's been a buzz of activity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta since scientists got their first samples of a new bird flu virus from China four weeks ago.

Already they've prepared "seed strains" of the virus, called H7N9, and distributed them to vaccine manufacturers so the companies can grow them up and make them into experimental flu vaccine.

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It's All Politics
4:12 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Congressional Hearings Put Renewed Focus On Benghazi Attack

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 8:56 pm

It has been nearly eight months since attacks on the U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, killed four Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens.

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Asia
3:13 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Are Those North Korean Long-Range Missiles For Real?

What appears to be a missile is carried during a mass military parade in Pyongyang, North Korea, on April 15, 2012. Some analysts say the half-dozen missiles showcased at the military parade were fakes.
Ng Han Guan AP

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 8:56 pm

When President Obama met with South Korean President Park Geun-hye on Tuesday, one item was high on the agenda: how to handle North Korea, which has in recent months threatened to strike both countries.

Obama called such threats "a dead end."

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World
2:55 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Kerry Appeals To Russia To Help End Syrian Civil War

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 8:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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Middle East
2:55 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Bishops Remain Missing After Capture In Syria

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 8:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

As Orthodox Christians around the world celebrated Easter this week, the Orthodox communities in Syria and neighboring Lebanon postponed festivities. Instead, they gathered in churches to pray for the safe return of two bishops kidnapped outside the Syrian city of Aleppo last month.

While the Syrian opposition and the regime of President Bashar al-Assad continue to trade blame for the abduction, the bishop's whereabouts remains a mystery. NPR's Susannah George has our story from Beirut.

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The Two-Way
2:38 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Pakistani Politician Imran Khan Falls From Lift During Campaign

An Imran Khan supporter prays on Tuesday for his quick recovery after he was rushed to a hospital with head injuries.
Asif Hassan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 5:20 pm

Pakistani cricketer turned politician Imran Khan is said to be OK after he fell from a lift during a campaign rally in Lahore on Tuesday.

Al-Jazeera reports that Khan "fell 14 feet as he was stepping off an improvised forklift that was raising him to the top of the platform."

Khan, who heads the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf, or PTI, party, was shown bleeding from the head after the fall.

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The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Obama Says U.S. And South Korea Stand Firm Against Pyongyang

President Obama and South Korean President Park Geun-hye after a news conference at the White House on Tuesday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

President Obama says the United States and South Korea are determined to stand firm against North Korean threats and that the days of Pyongyang manufacturing a crisis to get international concessions "are over."

In a joint news conference with South Korean President Park Geun-hye on Tuesday, Obama said the two leaders "very much share the view that we are going to maintain a strong deterrent" against North Korea.

"We're not going to reward provocative behavior, but we remain open to the prospect of North Korea taking a peaceful path," he said.

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The Salt
12:51 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Why Britain Has Gone Mad About Baking

Where the streets are lined with cake: This royal-themed cake was served during a street party in South London last June as part of celebrations of Queen Elizabeth II's Diamond Jubilee.
Andrew Cowie AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 2:51 pm

The first rule of cake club is: You ONLY talk about cake.

The second rule of cake club is: Try as many cakes as possible.

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World
12:25 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

The History And Politics Of Humanitarian Intervention

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

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The Two-Way
11:53 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Gas Tanker Explosion Kills At Least 20 Near Mexico City

Burned cars sit on a highway in Ecatepec near Mexico City, where a gas tanker truck exploded Tuesday. The explosion caused at least 20 deaths and widespread damage in the area.
Victor Rojas AFP/Getty Images

A tanker truck carrying gasoline exploded near Mexico City Tuesday morning, reportedly killing at least 20 people. The explosion, which early reports indicate was an accident, occurred after 5 a.m. local time on the busy highway between Mexico City and Pachuca.

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Middle East
3:11 am
Tue May 7, 2013

White House Sorts Out Syrian Chemical Weapons Allegations

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 9:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I 'm David Greene. Our understanding of the role chemical weapons are playing in Syria is no clearer today than it was a week ago. That's when President Obama said while there is evidence of chemical weapons used in the Syria, there is none pointing to who is responsible.

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Afghanistan
3:11 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Afghan-Pakistani Forces Exchange Fire Along Shared Border

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 9:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news. For the second time in less than a week, Afghan and Pakistani forces have exchanged fire along their shared border. The countries clashed again yesterday over a gate that Pakistani forces have been building on what Afghans say is their side of the line. The roots of this problem run much deeper.

But as NPR's Sean Carberry reports,.

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Economy
3:11 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Portugal Struggles To Avoid 2nd Bailout

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 9:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Europe is debating whether austerity - with its deep budget cuts and tax hikes - is the right cure for the continent's debt crisis. But in Portugal, one of the first countries bailed out by the European Union, the austerity drive goes on. The government there is struggling to repay its loans, and has announced more steep job and benefit cuts, as the country struggles to avoid what was Greece's fate - a second bailout.

Here's Lauren Frayer reports.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
1:02 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Germany's Paradox: Family-Friendly Benefits, But Few Kids

German Labor Minister Ursula von der Leyen (at left, shown here with German Chancellor Angela Merkel) has been the main government architect of measures aimed at helping women reconcile careers with having children.
John MacDougall AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 9:04 am

Germany is regarded as one of the most generous countries in the world when it comes to helping women raise families. The government invests about $260 billion each year into 156 separate family-friendly benefits, including health care, generous parental leave, subsidized day care and tax breaks.

Yet on a continent with low birthrates, Germany has the lowest of all, with just 1.39 children per woman.

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