World News

Europe
3:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Britons Wait For News On Royal Baby

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:04 am

The imminent arrival of the future heir to the British throne is spawning gambling, baby products and guessing over names. There's been no official announcement about when the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's baby is due. It's believed to be Saturday, and the kingdom is prepared.

Environment
3:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Environmentalists Warn Olympic Games Will Harm Sochi

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 am

Russia is preparing for the 2014 Winter Games — turning a sleepy valley in the Northern Caucasus Mountains into an Olympic village, with brand-new facilities for every Alpine sport. Officials say it will be a world-class destination for winter-sports enthusiasts long after the Games are over. Environmentalists say it's an ecological disaster in the making.

Parallels
1:19 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Israel's Internal Battle Over Ultra-Orthodox Soldiers

Soldiers close the gate to the tiny West Bank outpost, right next door to a Jewish settlement, where the HaHod platoon of the ultra-Orthodox Netzah Yahuda battalion is stationed.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 6:14 am

Moshe Haim always wanted to be a soldier. The 20-year-old is now a sergeant, more than halfway through three years of service in the Israeli military.

But when he goes home on leave, he doesn't talk about his military experiences to any of his eight siblings, especially his brothers.

"I know that for my parents and my brothers, the first, best choice is to be in the yeshiva and study there," he says at a small West Bank outpost where he's stationed. "It wasn't good for me, but my brothers are still pure."

Read more
Middle East
1:17 am
Fri July 12, 2013

In Southern Syria, Rebels Say U.S. Support Is Critical

Free Syrian Army fighters after a battle against government troops in Zaizoon, near Dera'a, on Feb. 16.
Shaam News Network Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:38 pm

The battle for the city of Dera'a in southern Syria has become a test of an American pledge to give military support to rebels fighting Syrian President Bashar Assad. After a string of defeats, the rebels have scored rare victories around Dera'a.

But in interviews,rebel commanders passing through neighboring Jordan say those gains could be lost without a dependable arms pipeline and promised U.S. support.

Yasser Aboud, a thin, intense former colonel in the Syrian army, commands the joint operations center for southern Syria.

Read more
Environment
12:46 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Sweeping Parts Of Southern Seas Could Become A Nature Preserve

The "Giant Tabular Iceberg" floats in Antarctica's Ross Sea in December 2011. Under a proposed new international agreement, large sections of the oceans around Antarctica would become protected as a marine preserve.
Camille Seaman Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:37 pm

The area of ocean set aside as a nature preserve could double or triple in the coming days, depending on the outcome of a meeting in Germany. Representatives from 24 countries and the European Union are considering setting aside large portions of ocean around Antarctica as a protected area. And the deal may hinge on preserving some fishing rights.

There are two proposals on the table: One would set aside huge parts of the Southern Ocean around East Antarctica; the other would focus on the Ross Sea, south of New Zealand.

Read more
The Salt
3:38 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Why Doctors Oppose Force-Feeding Guantanamo Hunger Strikers

To raise awareness about force-feeding, Yasiin Bey, the musician and actor formerly known as Mos Def, in a video voluntarily underwent the same procedure administered to prisoners who refuse solid food in political protest while they are held in Guantanamo Bay.
Reprieve/Asif Kapadia

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 4:26 pm

For centuries, the act of refusing food has turned human bodies into effective political bargaining chips. And so it's no surprise that the prisoners desperate to leave Guantanamo after, in some cases, nearly a dozen years there, have turned to hunger strikes on and off since 2005 to try to win their release.

Read more
World
2:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Residents Search For Answers After Deadly Train Explosion

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:55 pm

In Lac Megantic, Quebec, locals are waiting impatiently for answers following Saturday's train explosion that left 50 people dead. The provincial government in Quebec is blasting the railroad at the center of this disaster for responding too slowly — and requesting more aid from Canada's federal government to help the rural town rebuild.

Europe
2:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Russia Convicts Dead Man Of Tax Evasion In Symbolic Case

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:55 pm

A Moscow judge has found Sergei Magnitsky and his boss, investor William Browder, guilty of evading about $17 million in taxes. Trouble is, Magnitsky died in jail in 2009 and Browder is safe in Britain. The unusual exercise of trying a dead man seems to be an effort to rebut Browder's claims that Magnitsky was jailed in revenge for uncovering a $230 million tax fraud perpetrated by Russian officials. Magnitsky's supporters say he was beaten and mistreated during his year in pre-trial detention, and that he died from medical neglect.

Middle East
2:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

After Promising Military Aid, U.S. Sends Little To Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:55 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

One place military aid does not appear to be flowing yet is Syria. Rebel commanders in Syria say they are waiting for promised arms from the United States and growing impatient. Nearly a month has passed since the Obama administration said it would begin sending military help. As NPR's Scott Horsley reports, opposition in Congress appears to be a stumbling block.

Read more
Africa
2:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

U.S. Wants Egypt To Have An Inclusive Political Transition

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:21 pm

As the Obama administration slow-walks a decision on whether to call the ousting of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi a coup, which would lead to an aid cut off, U.S. officials are also in the awkward position of trying to encourage the Muslim Brotherhood to accept Morsi's ouster and return to the political process. President Obama has spoken by phone to the leader of Qatar, which had bankrolled the Morsi government. He's also been talking to Gulf leaders who were quick to step in to help Egypt after the Islamist government was toppled.

The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Death And Tax Evasion: The Strange Case Of Sergei Magnitsky

Sergei Magnitsky's mother, Nataliya Magnitskaya, holds a photo of her late son in 2009.
Alexander Zemlianichenko Associated Press

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 1:32 pm

A Russian court found whistle-blower Sergei Magnitsky guilty of tax evasion on Thursday, ending a convoluted case that caused a diplomatic row between Moscow and Washington. It gets even more bizarre given the fact that the man on trial died in 2009.

The posthumous conviction is unprecedented in modern times – even in a country with a history of show trials. But it's not entirely unheard of throughout the ages.

Read more
Parallels
12:15 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

China Unveils Massive Building — With Fake Beach, Fake Sun

A view of the New Century Global Center in Chengdu, China. The structure — located in a suburb of Chengdu, in southwest China's Sichuan province — is home to an indoor beach and a faux Mediterranean village.
Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:07 pm

The Chinese are calling the New Century Global Center, which opened in late June in Chengdu, the world's largest stand-alone structure.

Read more
Parallels
11:58 am
Thu July 11, 2013

If Egypt's Political Crisis Looks Bad, Check Out The Economy

Egyptian drivers wait in long lines outside a gas station in Cairo on June 26. Along with a stuttering economy, traffic-clogging street protests and a crime wave, fuel shortages have come to symbolize the disorder of the post-Mubarak Egypt.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:00 pm

The spotlight on Egypt has focused on the the political fallout from the military coup that toppled an elected but deeply unpopular government. But if you think Egypt's politics are a mess, just consider the economy.

Tourism, a major revenue generator, has been hurting since the Arab uprisings of 2011 that toppled Hosni Mubarak. Foreign investment has shriveled. Unemployment in many industries has soared. Inflation has risen, making everyday goods more expensive. And there's a black market in currency and fuel.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:41 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Why We Aren't Assuming Snowden Is On That Jet To Havana

The more northerly route that Aeroflot 150 normally takes.
FlightAware.com

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 1:57 pm

Twitter has been abuzz with speculation that "NSA leaker" Edward Snowden is on Aeroflot Flight 150, which is headed to Havana from Moscow as we write.

What's the supposed evidence?

Read more
Parallels
6:38 am
Thu July 11, 2013

What Should The U.S. Be Doing In Egypt?

Some Egyptian protesters felt the U.S. ambassador to Egypt, Anne Patterson, was too close to the recently deposed president, Mohammed Morsi. Demonstrators in Cairo carry banners denouncing her on June 30, three days before Morsi was ousted by Egypt's military.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 1:25 pm

Egypt's crisis has ignited a familiar debate over U.S. foreign policy where the combatants cluster around two basic viewpoints: The U.S. is doing too little, and the U.S. is doing too much.

So which is it? Is America shrewdly orchestrating events behind the scenes, or is it just an impotent bystander in the Egyptian drama? It depends on whom you ask.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:54 am
Thu July 11, 2013

50 Likely Died In Quebec Train Disaster, Officials Say

At a school in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, the town's people have been waiting for word about their friends and family members.
Christinne Muschi Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 8:13 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': Brian Mann reports from Quebec

Police in Quebec are not holding out hope that any of the people still missing after Saturday's train derailment and explosions in the town of Lac-Mégantic are alive.

With 20 bodies found so far and an additional 30 people still unaccounted for, that means the death toll is expected to be around 50. Authorities are telling the families of the missing to prepare for the worst.

Read more
Latin America
3:43 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Brazilian Protests Hurt President But Help Candidate Silva

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 2:52 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's go to Brazil now, where protests that began last month have transformed the political landscape. Today, there is a national strike supported by several unions. Before all these demonstrations began, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff seemed a sure bet to win reelection next year. Now her popularity has plummeted, and polls show she will probably face a runoff against another woman. Her name is Marina Silva. And as NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports, she has a compelling rags-to-political-power story.

Read more
Middle East
3:43 am
Thu July 11, 2013

For Those In Aleppo, Syria, Commuting Can Be Lethal

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 2:52 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Many of you, as you're listening, are on your commute to work, perhaps dealing with traffic, maybe waiting for a late train. But imagine for a moment a different commute, one on foot, where to get to work you have to pass through armed security checkpoints, all the while dodging sniper fire. That is the reality for many people in the Syrian city of Aleppo.

Read more
Middle East
3:43 am
Thu July 11, 2013

With President Morsi Out, Gulf States Open Their Checkbooks

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 10:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Read more
Africa
3:43 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Nigerian Terrorist Group Accused Of Killing Students

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 10:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

There's a very different kind of rebellion going on in northern Nigeria. It involves a movement that's been dubbed Boko Haram, which translates to: Western education is a sin. And it's often waged a deadly war against schools. Last weekend, gunmen attacked a bordering school. In a predawn raid, they doused a dormitory with fuel, set it on fire and shot students trying to flee. Forty-two students and teachers died. Authorities blame that and other attacks on the radical Islamists of Boko Haram.

Read more
Africa
3:43 am
Thu July 11, 2013

50 Years Ago, Raid Seals Mandela's Fate And His Fame

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 2:52 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

Nelson Mandela continues to lie very ill in a Pretoria hospital, though it is now said he's responding to treatment.

Read more
World
3:43 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Quebec Braces For More Victims From Train Blast

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 10:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Police in the Canadian province of Quebec say as many as 50 people are feared dead after a massive train explosion on Saturday. That growing death toll is another painful blow to residents still stunned after that blast flattened the heart of their small rural town. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann went to the community.

BRIAN MANN, BYLINE: I'm walking down the railroad tracks here in Lac-Megantic, Quebec. These are the tracks that the train rolled down Saturday, carrying its deadly cargo into the heart of the village.

Read more
Europe
2:52 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Critics: Trial Of Russian Protesters Threatens Right To Dissent

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 12:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. In Moscow, a dozen people are on trial in connection with a protest last year against Russian President Vladimir Putin. They're accused of attacking police and participating in mass riots after the demonstration turned violent. Critics charge that the trial is part of an intimidation campaign against dissidents. NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Moscow.

Read more
Political Crisis In Egypt
2:52 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Al-Jazeera Staffers Quit Over Alleged Bias In Egypt Coverage

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 2:48 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

This week, as many as 22 staffers at an Al Jazeera network in Egypt quit in protest of the network's coverage of events there. Al Jazeera is a Qatari-owned company. It's based in Doha, Qatar. The journalists claim that the network's management made them take a pro-Muslim Brotherhood stance on air during the military coup last week in Cairo.

Read more
Business
2:52 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Wal-Mart, Gap Join Bangladesh Factory Safety Group

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 3:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Some of the country's biggest retailers have unveiled an initiative they say will improve conditions for workers on the other side of the world. The move by Wal-Mart, Target, and others is intended to boost safety in Bangladesh garment factories.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports the plan is a response to the devastating building collapse that killed more than 1,100 people in April.

Read more
Political Crisis In Egypt
2:52 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Egypt's Military 'A Builder, A Liberator And Savior'

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 3:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Some historical context now to the overthrow of Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi. When the military stepped in last week, Western news headlines blared military coup. But those in Egypt who support the military's action argue that this is something different, not a takeover, but a rescue. To understand that view, we went looking for some background.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Political Crisis In Egypt
2:52 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Egypt's Religious Minorities Want Role In New Constitution

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 3:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. There is growing discord in Egypt among those who backed the militaries removal of the country's elected Islamist president. At the heart of the divide is Egypt's controversial constitution. The document, which is heavily influenced by Islamic law, was written by allies of former President Mohammed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood from which he hails.

Read more
Parallels
2:23 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

It's Not Just The Middle East With Quirky Booze Laws

Indiana still has some of the strictest laws governing alcohol sales in the United States, including a prohibition against all carryout alcohol sales on Sundays. Here, Bill Cheek, an employee at Kahn's Fine Wines and Spirits in Indianapolis, puts labels on cases of beer.
Darron Cummings AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 3:22 pm

As astute commentators pointed out in an earlier Parallels post about the vagaries of getting a drink in the Middle East, that isn't the only place where the laws regulating alcohol are more than a touch confusing, or where there's debate over them.

Some Americans don't need to look any further than their own local bar.

Commenter Glenn Zanotti shared his perspective:

Read more
NPR Story
2:21 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Lawmakers Express Concern About U.S.-Chinese Pork Deal

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 3:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Members of the Senate Agriculture Committee had a lot of questions today about the takeover of Smithfield Foods. That's because a Chinese company has offered to buy America's largest pork processor. Both Democratic and Republican senators have expressed concerns about the $4.7 billion deal and its potential effects on U.S. food safety and security.

NPR's John Ydstie has been following the testimony today and joins us now. Hi, John.

JOHN YDSTIE, BYLINE: Hi, Robert.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:46 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Report: Upside-Down Sensors Toppled Russian Rocket

The spectacular crash.
YouTube.com

Read more

Pages