World News

The Two-Way
1:46 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Report: Upside-Down Sensors Toppled Russian Rocket

The spectacular crash.
YouTube.com

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Parallels
12:15 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

That Blows: Cricket's Trumpet-Playing Superfan Silenced

Former England cricketer Geoffrey Boycott listens to Barmy Army trumpeter Billy Cooper during the second test between New Zealand and England at Basin Reserve on March 15 in Wellington, New Zealand. Cooper's trumpet will be silent at Trent Bridge, in Nottingham, England, because the ground doesn't allow musical instruments.
Gareth Copley Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 2:42 pm

The English national character is an eternal mystery. But from time to time we get a glimpse of some of its components. The story of Billy The Trumpet is one such occasion.

Billy is the embodiment of English eccentricity. He belongs to a boisterous ragtag band of sports fans called the Barmy Army. They're considered "barmy" for very good reason: These people follow England's national cricket team everywhere.

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The Two-Way
10:42 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Live From Mecca, It's Ramadan

Muslims circle the Kaaba as they pray inside the Grand Mosque in the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, during last October's hajj pilgrimage.
Hassan Ammar AP

Live streaming views of the Grand Mosque in Mecca, the holy city in Saudi Arabia that is closed to virtually all non-Muslim visitors, are playing online, depicting pilgrims' visits for the holy month of Ramadan. The video shows the faithful performing prayers and circumambulation around the Kaaba, the sacred cube at the mosque's center.

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The Two-Way
7:54 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Foul Play, Negligence Not Ruled Out In Quebec Train Disaster

Do not cross: Crime scene tape blocks access to part of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, where a train derailed and exploded on Saturday.
Stephen Morrison EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 4:19 am

Quebec police are looking into whether Saturday's train derailment and the massive explosions that followed in the small town of Lac-Megantic were caused by "foul play or criminal negligence," CBC News reported Wednesday morning.

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The Two-Way
7:03 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Royals In Nappies: A Family Album

Little Princess Elizabeth takes a ride on the grounds of Windsor Castle in 1927 with her cousin, Gerald Lascelles.
AP

The photographers are already setting up ahead of the expected birth this month of the little prince or princess who will be Britain's third in line to the throne.

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The Two-Way
5:53 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Reports: Egypt Orders Arrest Of Muslim Brotherhood Leader

Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie in Cairo last December.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:57 am

Prosecutors in Egypt have ordered that Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie be arrested, according to Egyptian state television and other news outlets.

NPR's Leila Fadel adds from Cairo that she's been told about the order by an Egyptian security official with knowledge of what's happening.

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NPR Story
2:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Egyptian Military Pushes Ahead With New Constitution Plans

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. In Egypt, the interim president and the generals who brought him to power are pushing ahead with what they say is a plan for a new constitution and elections. This is supposed to be a transition to some kind of real civilian rule. But it's already raising a lot of doubts about the intentions of the military. We've reached NPR's Leila Fadel in Cairo for the latest. Leila, good morning.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
3:34 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

For Now At Least, Egypt's Police Are Seen As The Good Guys

A member of Egypt's police special forces stands guard next to an armored vehicle on July 3, protecting a bridge between Cairo's Tahrir Square and Cairo University where Muslim Brotherhood supporters gathered.
Manu Brabo AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:15 pm

Egypt has undergone profound change over the past 10 days. The military has overthrown an elected Islamist president and is back in control of the country amid deadly clashes between Islamists and the state security forces.

There's been another change as well: Egypt's police, long reviled by much of the population, have become unlikely heroes for opponents of the now-ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

During Egypt's 2011 uprising, revolutionaries fought pitched street battles with the police force, the protector of the autocratic regime.

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Afghanistan
2:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Possible U.S. Troop Withdrawal Plan Worries Afghan Officials

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:00 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. President Obama has not yet decided how many troops to keep in Afghanistan after the NATO mission ends in 2014. The Pentagon and the White House both confirmed that today. Their comments follow a New York Times report that the president is seriously considering withdrawing all troops by the end of next year.

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Business
2:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Despite Scandal, Wall Street Lines Up To Bid For LIBOR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

On Wall Street, many things are bought and sold, including, occasionally, interest rates. That happened today. The owner of the New York Stock Exchange bought LIBOR, a hugely influential benchmark rate that is set in London. LIBOR is used to set many other interest rates, from credit cards to derivatives contracts.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
2:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Sen. Levin: U.S. Aid To Egypt Should Be Suspended

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Senator Carl Levin, the Michigan Democrat and chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee said last night that U.S. aide to Egypt should be suspended and Senator Levin joins us now. Welcome to the program once again.

SENATOR CARL LEVIN: Good to be with you.

SIEGEL: In a nutshell, why suspend aid to Egypt?

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Political Crisis In Egypt
2:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

A Coup Or Not? Semantics Could Affect Us Aid To Egypt

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:00 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In Washington on Capitol Hill, there are varying reactions to the events in Egypt. Congress was on vacation last week when Mohammed Morsi was ousted from power. Now, they're back and confronted with a big question about what happened in Cairo. Will they declare it a military coup? If they do, U.S. law would require all military aide to Egypt to be suspended. As NPR's David Welna reports, there's little consensus about whether that assistance should be cut off.

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NPR Story
2:45 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Syrian Conflict Continues Violent Spillover Into Lebanon

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 6:13 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A bomb placed in a parked car caused a massive explosion in Beirut today that injured dozens of people. Later, a Syrian rebel group claimed responsibility for the blast.

NPR's Kelly McEvers was at the scene of the attack. She sent this report on how the Syrian conflict is spilling over into Lebanon.

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NPR Story
2:45 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Dollar-Euro Exchange Rate Can Reveal Pulse Of Global Economy

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And now for our regular primer on global economics, no student loan required. Remember the European economic crisis? Just months ago, there was near panic that the euro zone would collapse, bringing down with it the entire international economy, again. So, how is Europe doing now and what is the overall state of the global economy? Well, one place economists look for answers to those questions is in the exchange rate between dollars and euros.

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Parallels
2:30 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

A Coup Or Not In Egypt? $1.5 Billion In U.S. Aid At Stake

Egyptians wave their national flag as army helicopters fly over Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 4, the day after the military ousted President Mohammed Morsi. Egypt's military receives $1.3 billion annually from the U.S.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 1:26 pm

When the Egyptian military ousted the democratically elected president, Mohammed Morsi, it was widely described as a coup. But not universally so.

The U.S., which has been a huge aid donor to Egypt for more than three decades, has so far declined to decide one way or the other.

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Parallels
10:54 am
Tue July 9, 2013

In Protest, German Activists Light Up U.S. Embassy

German activists used a light projection on the U.S. Embassy in Berlin in the pre-dawn hours of Sunday. The Stasi were the former East German police who spied on citizens during the communist era.
YouTube

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:16 am

In the wee hours of Sunday, the U.S. Embassy in Berlin became the unwitting host of a light show expressing opposition the U.S. surveillance programs.

"The United Stasi of America," was splashed on a wall at the embassy around 1 a.m., the work of German guerrilla artists.

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World
10:18 am
Tue July 9, 2013

A New Start For Egypt?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, young people are mowing lawns and lifeguarding this summer, so our money coach will talk about summer jobs and the importance of teaching children about financial responsibility. But first, we wanted to talk about the dramatic events unfolding in Egypt. Here's what we know so far. Last week, millions of Egyptians took to the streets in cities across the country. They were protesting against the president, Mohamed Morsi.

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World
10:18 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Do Egyptians Consider Morsi's Ousting A 'Coup?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We are continuing our conversation with Heba Gamal, who's been protesting in the streets of Cairo. And Al-Jazeera's Abderrahim Foukara. We're talking about the unrest in Egypt. Where is Morsi, by the way? Does...

ABDERRAHIM FOUKARA: Well...

MARTIN: ...Anyone know?

FOUKARA: He's still in - go ahead, Heba.

MARTIN: Heba, do you know?

HEBA GAMAL: Word on the street is, he is in the presidential guard. He is in the building that's in the presidential guard.

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Parallels
9:18 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Syria's War (The Official Version) Plays Out On TV

Syrian soap opera Wilada min al-Khasira is incorporating current events into its storylines, including tough subjects such as torture and the detention of anti-government protesters. The third season of the popular show begins this week.
Courtesy of Clacket Productions

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:31 am

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Parallels
9:16 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Key Takeaways From Pakistan's Report On Osama Bin Laden

Children walk past the house of former al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan, on May 8, 2011. A new Pakistani report says the "extent of incompetence" in failing to detect bin Laden despite the size of the house was "to put it mildly ... astounding, if not unbelievable."
Anjum Naveed AP

We've waded through the 336-page Pakistani report on the circumstances surrounding the killing of Osama bin Laden to find the most interesting bits. As we noted yesterday, it was obtained and published by Al Jazeera.

First of all, it starts more like a novel than a government-commissioned report:

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The Two-Way
5:13 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Egypt's Interim Leader May Tap Emergency Law Used By Mubarak

Egypt's military and the nation's interim leaders say the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi was not a coup, but rather a response to public demand. Morsi's supporters believe otherwise. If it was judged to be a coup, the U.S. might have to cut off aid to Egypt's military.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:15 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Cairo

With the news still echoing across Egypt that more than 50 people were killed during a protest over the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, the country's interim leader issued a decree late Monday that gives himself sweeping powers until new elections are held.

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Middle East
3:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Monday's Bloodshed Hardens Political Divisions

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 3:50 am

Egypt's interim president, who was installed by a military coup last week, issued a plan calling for parliamentary elections next year and giving himself sweeping powers in the meantime. His move came hours after the deadliest clash yet between security forces and supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

NPR Story
2:58 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Snowden's Leaks Puts National Security Agency In A Bind

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As Larry just said, the Privacy Board can now openly debate NSA surveillance programs, thanks to the revelations from Edward Snowden. And this is just one example of how Snowden's leaks have put the NSA in a bind. To talk more about this we're joined by NPR's justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Carrie, thanks for coming in.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Thank you.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
1:48 am
Tue July 9, 2013

What Egyptian State TV Says About The State Of Egypt

In an image from a video broadcast on Egyptian state TV, President Mohammed Morsi addresses the nation on July 2 — his final speech before the military deposed him.
Ismael Mohamad UPI /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:23 am

It sounded like a slip of the tongue. As millions of Egyptians took to the streets calling for President Mohammed Morsi to step down, state TV anchor George Heshmat casually used the word "revolution" instead of "protests."

This signaled that state TV was beginning to assert its independence from a government that was never a good fit for it anyway. It was clear that something had changed at the voice of the state — even before Morsi was pushed from power.

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Shots - Health News
1:37 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Treating The 'Body And Soul' In A Russian TB Prison

An inmate practices for the yearly talent show in the prison's concert hall. Such cultural activities are part of the hospital's treatment, which combines correction with education, medical and psychological therapy.
Konstantin Salomatin/for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:41 am

Igor Davydenko is rail-thin with dark circles under his eyes. He has a haunted look, reinforced by black prison overalls with reflective tape on the shoulders and cuffs.

Davydenko could be labeled as a loser in many ways. The 31-year-old is a drug addict, serving time for robbery and assault. He's serving his third stretch in a Siberian prison.

But Davydenko is about to become a winner in at least one way. If all goes well, he will soon be declared cured of one of the deadliest forms of tuberculosis.

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The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Death Toll Rises To 13 In Quebec Train Explosion

The death toll has been raised to 13 in a freight train's derailment and explosion in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, this past weekend.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:50 am

Police in a small town in Quebec, Canada, where a runaway freight train holding crude oil caused a massive explosion, say they have found the bodies of eight more victims, bringing the death toll in Saturday's incident to 13. The authorities say dozens of people are still unaccounted for.

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World
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Crews Still Searching For Missing After Quebec Train Accident

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In rural eastern Quebec, crews are still searching for dozens of people still reported missing after a train carrying oil and derailed and erupted into a fiery ball on Saturday. Authorities have confirmed five deaths. The accident comes as more oil than ever is moving by railroad, and that's raising questions about safety.

NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

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Africa
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Muslim Brotherhood Has Long History In Egypt

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Muslim Brotherhood is not a passing feature on the Egyptian scene. To get some sense of where it may be heading, we're going to hear now about where it's coming from. We called on Yasser El-Shimy, an Egypt Middle East analyst for the International Crisis Group, to give us some background on the group, beginning with the Brotherhood's founding in 1928 when Britain effectively controlled Egypt.

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Africa
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

At Least 50 Egyptians Killed In Bloody Clash

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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The Salt
2:35 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

France Battles Scourge Of Ready-To-Eat Meals In Restaurants

We're guessing microwavable, premade meals are not an issue in this kitchen, at the three-Michelin-star restaurant L'Auberge du Pont de Collonges near Lyon, France.
Laurent Cipriani AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:47 pm

France's vaunted culinary culture has been taking it on the chin lately.

First came the news, which we told you about in April, that the majority of France's restaurants are now fast-food joints.

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