World News

Shots - Health News
11:22 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Weight Loss Is Worth Gold In Dubai

Lose pounds and gain grams of gold in Dubai.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 8:43 am

If you want people to slim down, why not reward them with gold? That's the tack being taken in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Alarmed at ballooning waistlines in a region where fast food is common and comfortable outdoor exercise is not, the local government is offering to give citizens a gram of gold for each kilogram lost by Aug. 16, according to news reports.

That's about $41 for a little over two pounds of pudge, based on today's market rate.

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Parallels
9:42 am
Wed July 17, 2013

School Tragedy Puts Focus On Poor Health Of India's Children

This man's daughter, who ate tainted food at a school on Tuesday, died in the eastern Indian city of Patna on Wednesday.
AP

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 2:42 pm

We're following the tragedy in India where more than 20 children died after eating tainted food Tuesday at their school as part of their midday meal program.

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The Two-Way
5:28 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Lawyer: Snowden Could Leave Moscow Airport Within A Week

Terminal F of Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport where Edward Snowden remains.
Paul Gypteau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 10:22 am

A day after submitting an application for temporary asylum in Russia, the lawyer representing Edward Snowden tells Russia's Interfax news agency that the NSA leaker could leave the transit zone of Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport within a week.

Reuters reports:

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World
5:05 am
Wed July 17, 2013

English Soccer Team Sees New Level Of Fan Dedication

As players for the team were sightseeing in Vietnam, they noticed a man in an Arsenal shirt running alongside the team bus. He kept pace for more than 3 miles. Players began chanting, "Sign him up!"

The Two-Way
4:55 am
Wed July 17, 2013

In India, At Least 22 Children Die After Eating Poisoned School Lunch

A woman cries after her grandson, who consumed a poisoned meal at a school on Tuesday, died at a hospital in the eastern Indian city of Patna.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 2:42 pm

At least 22 children are dead in India after they ate a poisoned school lunch Tuesday at a school in the eastern state of Bihar.

The images are horrific. The AFP reports:

"There were emotional scenes as children, their limbs dangling and heads lolling to one side, were brought to a hospital in the Bihar city of Chhapra.

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Africa
2:42 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Holding Zimbabwe's Leaders Accountable Through Poetry

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 3:13 am

As Zimbabwe prepares for hotly contested elections later this month, there's pressure on politicians to avoid violence and follow through on promises. One group making sure the country's leaders do what they promised is the group Zimbabwe Poets for Human Rights.

Latin America
2:42 am
Wed July 17, 2013

How Ramadan Affects Guantanamo Bay Detainees' Hunger Strike

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 5:58 am

A federal judge has refused to stop the force-feeding of Guantanamo Bay inmates on a hunger strike. David Greene talks to Carol Rosenberg, of the Miami Herald, who's just returned from the Guantanamo Bay detention center in Cuba, where she's been reporting on the prisoners' hunger strike.

Shots - Health News
1:02 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Sickle Cell Anemia Is On The Rise Worldwide

Red blood cells are normally shaped like doughnuts, but sickle cells (purple) are flattened and clump together.
NIH

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 8:45 am

Sickle cell anemia may not be as well-known as, say, malaria, tuberculosis or AIDS. But every year, hundreds of thousands of babies around the world are born with this inherited blood disorder. And the numbers are expected to climb.

The number of sickle cell anemia cases is expected to increase about 30 percent globally by 2050, scientists said Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease is most common, will be the hardest hit.

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Parallels
12:59 am
Wed July 17, 2013

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

The Mathare Valley, shown here in an aerial map, is one of the largest and oldest slums in Nairobi, Kenya. Residents are using hand-held GPS devices to map the area, which comprises 13 villages and is home to nearly 200,000 people.
Courtesy of Muungano Support Trust and Jason Corburn, UC Berkeley

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 6:56 pm

If you were to do a search for the Nairobi city slum of Mathare on Google Maps, you'd find little more than gray spaces between unmarked roads.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
3:03 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Some Worry Egypt Could Become A Repressive Police State

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:00 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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The Two-Way
3:03 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

LISTEN: 'Light Warlpiri,' The New Language In Australia

A screen image from a video that professor Carmel O'Shannessy has created. In it, a girl tells a story in "Light Warlpiri," the language O'Shannessy reports she discovered in Australia.
Carmel O'Shannessy

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:00 pm

  • From 'All Things Considered': Carmel O'Shannessy tells Audie Cornish about the origin of 'Light Warlpiri.'

We've all read stories about languages that are dying.

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The Two-Way
11:45 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Cuba Acknowledges N. Korean Ship Carried Its 'Obsolete' Weapons

View of North Korean vessel at the Manzanillo Port in Colon on Tuesday.
Rodrigo Arangua AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 7:53 pm

(Updated 9:40 p.m. ET)

A statement from Cuba's foreign ministry says weapons that Panama seized in a North Korean ship were mid-20th Century models that Cuba was sending to North Korea for repair, according to reports from the BBC and Reuters.

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World
10:07 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Northern Nigeria University On Edge After Violence

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We turn now to northern Nigeria where more than 50 teachers and students have been killed in terrorist attacks just in the last month. The group known as Boko Haram, which loosely means Western education is forbidden, is allegedly responsible for these, as well as previous attacks on churches and government institutions. The leader of the extremist Islamist sect has said he fully supports the attacks and has called for more targeting of schools.

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Parallels
9:20 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Latin Drug Bosses And Their Growing American Ties

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:42 am

Latin American cartels are fueled by U.S. drug demand, so their illegal retail networks often stretch throughout America. Mexico's arrest of Miguel Angel Trevino Morales was a reminder that the connections between drug traffickers and the U.S. are not just commercial — they're also personal.

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Snowden Asks For Temporary Asylum In Russia, Says Lawyer

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 9:20 am

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor who leaked a cache of classified documents about U.S. surveillance programs, officially filed for temporary asylum in Russia on Tuesday, a human rights lawyer and WikiLeaks say.

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The Two-Way
4:43 am
Tue July 16, 2013

In Egypt, More Clashes Leave 7 Dead, Hundreds Injured

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi block the Six October bridge on Tuesday in the center of Cairo.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:00 am

After what had been a week of calm, violence returned to the streets of Cairo late Monday into early Tuesday.

NPR's Leila Fadel reports that Egypt's health ministry said seven people were killed and more than 200 were injured as supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi clashed with police. From Cairo, Leila filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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Latin America
3:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Vicious Cartel Leader Arrested In Mexico

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:05 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

One of the most brutal and vicious cartel leaders in Mexico has been arrested. Early yesterday morning, Mexican marines, caught the leader of the notorious Zeta gang organization. The country has killed or captured dozens of kingpins in recent years without managing to bring an end to the high murder rates in many areas.

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Middle East
3:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Syrian Refugees Caught Up In Egypt's Political Crisis

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 1:27 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Egypt, the ouster of President Mohammad Morsi has changed things - not just for Egyptians but also for another group of Arabs living in that country. It's a story of how when one group falls from grace, so do those who are perceived to be its supporters. Under the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt was a safe haven for Syrians fleeing the war in their country.

Now, as NPR's Kelly McEvers reports from Cairo, the power shift in Egypt is putting Syrians in danger.

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Shots - Health News
1:15 am
Tue July 16, 2013

South Africa Weighs Starting HIV Drug Treatment Sooner

A woman waits to get AIDS drugs on April 8 at a clinic in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa, about 55 miles north of Johannesburg. New WHO guidelines say patients should start HIV treatment much earlier, before they become extremely sick.
Stephane de Sakutin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 4:22 am

The World Health Organization has issued revised guidelines saying that people with HIV should be put on antiviral drugs far earlier than was previously recommended. The hope is that most patients would get started on treatment before they begin to get extremely sick.

It's a move that could have huge implications for African nations where millions of people are infected with HIV. In South Africa roughly 5.5 million people are living with HIV — more than any other country in the world. South Africa also has more people in treatment than anywhere else.

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The Salt
3:21 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

In Argentina, Coca-Cola Tests Market For 'Green' Coke

Coca-Cola Life, a new product being rolled out in Argentina with a green label, is being marketed as a "natural" and therefore lower-calorie cola.
Coca-Cola

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 4:40 pm

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The Salt
3:18 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

The Secret To Georgian Grilled Meats? Grapevines And Lots Of Wine

Shashlik cooks on a hot grill. Kakheti, the easternmost province in the Republic of Georgia, is known for meats grilled over grapevines, which burn quickly, leaving a heap of finger-sized coals.
Nick Grabowski via Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:27 pm

Tucked between Russia and Turkey, the Republic of Georgia is renowned for great food: cheese dishes, pickles, breads and stews. This is a cuisine that you should not miss.

And on summer evenings in the capital, Tbilisi, the air is fragrant with the smells of one of Georgian cookery's highlights: grilled meat, or shashlik.

You can find good shashlik at restaurants with white tablecloths, but the very best in all Tbilisi is said to be at a roadside stop called Mtsvadi Tsalamze. It's an unassuming place with rows of wooden picnic tables in an open yard.

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Parallels
2:19 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

A Nonstop Tribute To Nelson Mandela

Well-wishers have gathered outside of Nelson Mandela's hospital to offer their support.
Andy Carvin NPR

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:44 pm

They have assembled in front of the hospital by the dozens: church groups, families, even a motorcycle club, their engines revving at full throttle. Mothers encouraged their shy children to squeeze through the crowd and place a bouquet of flowers at the base of a makeshift shrine. A member of the crowd conducted an impromptu choir, inviting others to join in and sing a hymn together.

For more than a month now, throngs of well-wishers have gathered outside the Mediclinic Heart Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa, praying for the health of former President Nelson Mandela.

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Remembrances
2:17 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

'Night Witch' Flew Bomber Planes During World War II

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 4:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. Nadezhda Popova was known as a Witch of the Night, but instead of a broom, she flew a bomber. Popova was a member of the 588th Night Bomber Regiment, a group of young Russian women who volunteered to fly planes during World War II. The whooshing sound of their aircraft made of wood and canvas and the fact that they only flew in the dead of night inspired German troops to dub them the Night Witches.

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Middle East
2:17 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Israelis, Palestinians Keep Close Eye On Events In Egypt

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 6:44 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Israelis and Palestinians disagree on many things, but both have this in common: They've been closely watching events in Egypt. The change in government there could shake up security and politics across the region. At the center of the uncertainty is Hamas, the Islamist Palestinian movement with close ties to Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood.

NPR's Emily Harris has that story.

EMILY HARRIS, BYLINE: Between Israel's southern border and Cairo, there's the Sinai.

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Author Interviews
1:04 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Christ In Context: 'Zealot' Explores The Life Of Jesus

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:13 pm

Writer and scholar Reza Aslan was 15 years old when he found Jesus. His secular Muslim family had fled to the U.S. from Iran, and Aslan's conversion was, in a sense, an adolescent's attempt to fit into American life and culture. "My parents were certainly surprised," Aslan tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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Parallels
12:37 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

In Venice, Huge Cruise Ships Bring Tourists And Complaints

A massive cruise ships towers over Venice. Some 650 cruise ships now visit the Italian city annually, and critics say they threaten the city's fragile architecture.
Courtesty of the No Big Ships Committee

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 4:13 pm

The fragile architectural treasures of Venice are endangered by rising sea levels, and a growing number of critics now say the city and its canals are at risk from massive cruise ships as big as floating skyscrapers.

On an average day, tens of thousands of passengers lean over the railings of cruise ships that can be 300 yards long and 15 stories high. The tourists peer down at the majestic Doge's Palace as they sail into St. Mark's basin and down the Giudecca canal.

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Parallels
11:27 am
Mon July 15, 2013

New Bangladeshi Law Lets Workers Unionize More Freely

A Bangladeshi garment worker participates in a protest outside the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Export Association office building in the capital, Dhaka, on July 11. The country's Parliament approved a new law that would allow workers to unionize more freely.
A.M. Ahad AP

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 11:55 am

The garment factory collapse in Bangladesh, which killed more than 1,000 people in April, has spurred the Parliament into action.

The legislature approved a law Monday that makes it easier for workers to unionize. The vote comes amid scrutiny of working conditions in the country after the building collapse outside Dhaka, the capital.

The building, Rana Plaza, housed garment factories that churned out products for some of the world's top brands.

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Parallels
10:45 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Datsun's Rebirth In India And The Revival Of Long-Gone Cars

Nissan Motor Co. President and CEO Carlos Ghosn poses with the Datsun Go in New Delhi on Monday. Its the first new Datsun model in more than three decades.
Manish Swarup AP

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World
4:51 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Canadian Town Is Nuts For Taters

Florenceville-Bristol produces about a third of the world's frozen french fries. So, of course, this tater town celebrated National French Fry Day over the weekend. A huge portrait of the town's covered bridge was unveiled. It was made from 5,700 fries.

Parallels
1:04 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Iran's New President Hints At Easing Internet Controls

Iranians surf the web at an Internet cafe in Tehran on April 28, 2013. The recently elected president, Hasan Rowhani, has suggested that he may loosen restrictions on the Internet.
Abedin Taherkenareh EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:10 am

Iran's President-elect Hasan Rowhani has already called for less filtering of the Internet, saying Iran must maintain its principles, but also needs to engage with the wider world.

"We should rectify our relations with the world," Rowhani said in remarks carried by Iran's Press TV. "Gone are the days when a wall could be built around the country.... Today there are no more walls."

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