World News

The Two-Way
9:09 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Rescuers Struggling To Reach Areas Of China Hit By Quake

As rocks and dirt tumble down a mountainside (at left), a police officer urges people to stay back on a road in Baoxing county, Sichuan province, on Monday. Rescuers are having a hard time getting to victims of Saturday's strong earthquake because of aftershocks and landslides.
CHINA DAILY Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 11:47 am

Reaching the victims of Saturday's strong earthquake in China's Sichuan province remains difficult because of aftershocks and landslides.

According to Voice of America:

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The Salt
1:22 am
Mon April 22, 2013

How Coffee Brings The World Together

The best coffee comes from high altitudes with a warm climate like in Huehuetenango, Guatemala.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 1:51 pm

Coffee is more than a drink. For many of us — OK, for me — it's woven into the fabric of every day.

It also connects us to far corners of the globe.

For instance, every Friday, a truck pulls up to the warehouse of Counter Culture Coffee, a small roaster and coffee distributor in Durham, N.C., and unloads a bunch of heavy burlap sacks.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
1:20 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Want More Gender Equality At Work? Go To An Emerging Market

Petrobras state-owned oil company CEO Maria das Gracas Silva Foster makes a speech during the Women's Forum Brazil 2012 in Sao Paulo, Brazil last year.
Yasuyoshi Chiba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 8:11 am

A White House report puts it bluntly: "Today, younger women are more likely to graduate from college than are men and are more likely to hold a graduate school degree."

For the past decade more American women than men have earned undergraduate and Master's degrees; and in the past three years, they've outpaced men at the doctoral level, too.

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World
3:44 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Rare Churchill Poem Fails To Sell At Auction

A portrait of Winston Churchill in 1900, around the time he wrote "Our Modern Watchwords."
J.E. Purdy Library of Congress

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 4:23 pm

Around the turn of the 19th century, before he became Britain's revered prime minister, a young Winston Churchill found himself in South Africa. He was serving in the Army and as a war correspondent covering the Boer War.

One day, he put a blue pencil to army-issued notepaper and conveyed his thoughts about the conflict in a 40-line poem. More than a century later, "Our Modern Watchwords" was discovered by a retired manuscript dealer.

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The Two-Way
1:28 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Outrage Erupts In India Over 5-Year-Old Girl's Rape

Activists from India's main opposition party jostle with police outside Sonia Gandhi's residence on Sunday.
AP

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 8:28 pm

"What has changed?" That is the question echoing through Delhi on Sunday. Public frustration over sexual crimes against women is erupting again, this time over a gruesome sexual assault of a 5-year-old girl.

The protests are smaller than those that swept over the capital in December with the fatal gang-rape of a 23-year-old woman, but the incident has revived debate over the startling state of sexual violence in India.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
10:47 am
Sun April 21, 2013

An Exploration Of The Changing Lives Of Women

Graphic designer Kaleena Porter sits with her dog, Moby, in the living room of her new home in Washington, D.C.
Marie McGrory NPR

Many revolutions begin with the sound of explosions and marching boots.

Now, another revolution is shaking up the world, and it's moving forward to the beep of alarm clocks and the clack of heels heading out.

Legions of women around the world are leaving their homes to join the paid labor force. Worldwide, 4 in 10 paid workers are female; in the coming decade, an estimated 1 billion more women will enter the formal workforce, pushing up economic growth.

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The Two-Way
7:46 am
Sun April 21, 2013

London Marathon Marked By High Security, Memories Of Boston

London Marathon runners stand in a silent, pre-race tribute Sunday to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings. The police presence was increased for the London event.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 1:24 pm

The London Marathon observed 30 seconds of silence before the race got underway Sunday, in a show of solidarity with the victims of Monday's attack at the Boston Marathon. Many runners and spectators wore black ribbons to honor the three people killed and the more than 170 injured in two bombings.

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National Security
5:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Boston, Bombs And Lessons From Israel

Workers repair the Cafe Hillel in front of candles for the victims of a suicide attack in west Jerusalem on Sept. 10, 2003. Eight people, including the bomber, died and several dozen were wounded by the explosion that went off near the popular cafe.
Pedro Ugarte AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 7:50 am

As reporters in Jerusalem a decade ago, my wife, Jennifer Griffin, and I covered more than 100 suicide bombings over several blood-soaked years. The carnage defined our lives as we raced to blast sites, interviewed battered survivors in emergency rooms and tracked down the extremists behind the deadly attacks.

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Middle East
5:38 am
Sun April 21, 2013

New Aid To Syria Comes With Fear Of Funding The Wrong Opposition

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry listens in during a "Friends of Syria" group meeting hosted on Saturday in Istanbul, Turkey.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 7:09 pm

At an 11-nation meeting in Turkey this weekend, there was one thing the United States, European and Arab states could agree on: With more than 70,000 killed and millions of people displaced, the Syrian crisis, as Secretary of State John Kerry says, is "horrific."

In response, the Obama administration is doubling its non-lethal assistance to the Syrian opposition, Kerry announced at the meeting.

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The Two-Way
6:18 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Strong Quake In China Kills Dozens, Injures Thousands

A rescuer carries a child to safety after she was pulled out of her collapsed home after an earthquake hit Ya'an City in southwest China's Sichuan province on Saturday.
AFP/Getty Images

"A powerful earthquake jolted China's Sichuan province Saturday near where a devastating quake struck five years ago," The Associated Press writes. According to CNN, early estimates put the death toll around 100. More than 1,000 other people were reportedly injured. Both figures could change substantially as more information comes in.

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Asia
5:41 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Suspects' Chechen Roots Draws Eyes In Russia

In this image taken from a cellphone video, the father of the Boston bombing suspects, Anzor Tsarnaev, talks to the media about his sons, in his home in Makhachkala, the Dagestani capital, on Friday.
AP

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 12:09 pm

The Boston Marathon bombing suspects are ethnic Chechens with links to the volatile North Caucasus region of Russia. Moscow's reaction to that fact appears to be as complex as the region's turbulent history.

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The Two-Way
12:46 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

CDC: U.S. Hospitals Should Be Vigilant For Bird Flu

An H7N9 bird flu patient is escorted after his recovery and approval for discharge at a central China hospital on Friday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 12:57 pm

U.S. hospitals have been urged to be on the lookout for symptoms of bird flu among patients who have recently traveled to China, where a new strain of the virus has killed 17 people and infected more than 70.

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The Two-Way
12:46 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Boston Bombing Suspects Are Brothers Living In U.S. For Years

This combination of undated photos shows Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, left, and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19.
AP

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 11:23 am

Updated 1:50 p.m. ET: (Correcting that brothers shared an apartment in Cambridge, not Watertown.)

The suspects in Monday's deadly Boston Marathon explosions and the Thursday night murder of a police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are two brothers from a former Soviet republic who were in the United States legally for years, and lived together in a Cambridge, Mass., apartment.

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The Two-Way
11:42 am
Fri April 19, 2013

French Family Set Free After Cameroon Kidnapping

A security guard in Cameroon shows photos of Tanguy Moulin-Fournier and his wife, Albane, and their four children, in February.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Members of a French family held for weeks by Boko Haram militants in Cameroon have been freed and are in good health, Al-Jazeera reports, citing Cameroonian and French officials.

Cameroon's President Paul Biya, in a statement read on national radio, said the couple and their four children, aged 5 to 12, had been "handed over last night to Cameroonian authorities."

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National Security
10:56 am
Fri April 19, 2013

How To Lock Down A City

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we are going to dig into the new Senate bill that would dramatically overhaul the country's immigration framework. We want to answer as many questions as we can about the bill and also talk about what it says, or what it might say, about what immigration means to the American people right now.

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Politics
10:56 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Breaking Down Senate's Immigration Overhaul Bill

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we'll check in with the Barbershop guys to hear what they have to say about all the news of the week.

But, first, it's only because of the kind of week that we've had that it would be possible that a major issue like the one we're about to talk about could actually fly under the radar. It was introduced by a group called the Gang of Eight, a bipartisan group who also had the support of a very wide array of interest groups that often do not agree on much of anything.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
9:28 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Terrorism Expert Weighs In On Monday's Bombing In Boston

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 11:32 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

There's so much we do not know about the Boston Marathon bombing, but here are some things that we do know. Police have focused on two suspects who were found on video images from the scene of the bombing. They chased those two young men last night, shot it out with them. A police officer is dead. A police officer is wounded in the Boston area. One of the suspects, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, is reported killed, a second one still at large, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, both of them described as being from Chechnya.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
9:28 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Boston Bombing Manhunt Encompasses Boston Suburb

For the latest on the Boston Marathon Bombing case, David Greene and Steve Inskeep talk to Fred Bever of member station WBUR and Chechen expert Thomas de Waal of the Carnegie Endowment for International peace

Around the Nation
6:57 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Boston Bombing On White House And Russia's Radar

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 11:32 am

Steve Inskeep speaks with NPR's Scott Horsley, who has the White House perspective on news of the Boston Marathon bombings manhunt. NPR has confirmed that the two suspects were from Chechnya. For insights on that region, Morning Edition talks with Matt Rojansky, deputy director of the Russia and Eurasia program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Europe
6:42 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Boston Marathon Bombers Described As Chechens

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 8:45 am

Steve Inskeep talks to NPR's Corey Flintoff in Moscow for reaction to news that Boston Marathon bombing suspects are from Chechnya. One suspect has been killed and the other is on the run. Authorities have encouraged Boston-area residents to shelter in place.

Shots - Health News
3:42 am
Fri April 19, 2013

With Bird Flu, 'Right Now, Anything Is Possible'

A health worker collects pigeons from a trap at People's Square in Shanghai, China, earlier this month. So far, workers have tested more than 48,000 animals for the H7N9 flu virus.
ChinaFotoPress Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 7:27 pm

An international dream team of flu experts assembled in China today.

Underscoring the urgency that public health agencies feel about the emergence of a new kind of bird flu, the team is headed by Dr. Keiji Fukuda, the World Health Organization's top influenza scientist.

Before he left Geneva, Fukuda explained the wide-open nature of the investigation in an interview with NPR.

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Latin America
12:46 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Post-Chavez Venezuela Grows More, Not Less, Polarized

Supporters of Venezuelan opposition presidential candidate Henrique Capriles protest in the area of Altamira, in Caracas, capital of Venezuela, on Monday.
Mauricio Valenzuela Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 6:37 am

Under the rule of its late president, Hugo Chavez, Venezuela became a nation sharply divided between those who supported his self-styled socialist revolution and those who opposed it.

But after a disputed presidential election in which Chavez's deputy was ruled the winner by a razor-thin margin, the country appears more polarized than ever.

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World
12:28 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

Malala: How A Young Girl Became A World Symbol

Fifteen-year-old Malala Yousafzai has become a symbol of hope for change in Pakistan and the world. Since her near-fatal shooting in 2012, her voice and reach has grown, as she speaks out against the Taliban's influence, and advocates for education for Pakistani youth.

The Two-Way
10:45 am
Thu April 18, 2013

China's New Urban Legend That Turned Out Not To Be

China's President Xi Jinping (center back) walks to his seat as he arrives at the opening ceremony of the annual Boao Forum in Boao, in southern China's Hainan province, on Sunday.
Alexander F. Yuan AP

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 6:27 pm

In China, countless television soap operas have been based on the adventures of Emperor Kangxi, a Qing ruler in the 17th century who, according to legend, would slip off his yellow dragon-embroidered silk robes to travel incognito among his people.

For several hours Thursday, a story went viral on the Chinese Internet that the new Communist equivalent of the emperor, President Xi Jinping, had pulled the same trick.

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Movie Interviews
9:53 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Sebastian Junger: 'Which Way' To Turn After Hetherington's Death

Photographer Tim Hetherington during an assignment for Vanity Fair Magazine at the Restrepo outpost.
Tim A. Hetherington

War photographer Tim Hetherington said he thought war was wired into young men. And he risked, and ultimately gave, his life to capture these young men in photographs and video — in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Afghanistan and other war zones. Hetherington was killed by shrapnel from a mortar round while taking pictures in Libya in 2011, during the uprising against President Moammar Gadhafi.

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Thu April 18, 2013

North Korea: End U.N. Sanctions, And Talks Can Resume

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 12:33 pm

North Korea on Thursday says it is ready to resume talks with the U.S. and South Korea if they end joint military exercises and the United Nations drops sanctions.

The official KCNA news agency carried the statement from North Korea's National Defense Commission calling for a resumption of dialogue.

"The first step will be withdrawing the U.N. Security Council resolutions cooked up on ridiculous grounds," the statement said.

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The Two-Way
7:55 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Ex-Pakistani Strongman Musharraf Flees Courtroom

Musharraf's bulletproof SUV leaves the courtroom Thursday immediately after bail was revoked.
STR AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 9:43 am

Former Pakistani military ruler Pervez Musharraf's bodyguards spirited him out of an Islamabad courtroom Thursday to avoid his arrest on treason charges after a judge revoked bail.

Police in the courtroom made no attempt to detain Musharraf, 69, who was whisked away by his security detail to his residence in a suburb of the capital.

The BBC's Orla Guerin described the scene at the courthouse as "a moment of high drama and farce."

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The Picture Show
1:17 am
Thu April 18, 2013

In 'Which Way,' A War Photographer In His Element

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Spc. Tad Donoho screams with pain in 2008 after being administered a "pink belly" for his birthday in Korengal Valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan. Each member of the platoon strikes his stomach until it begins to bruise, hence the name pink belly. From the book Infidel.
Tim Hetherington Magnum Photos

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:22 am

At the 2011 Academy Awards, the film Restrepo was among the documentaries nominated for an Oscar. It follows an American platoon on a remote mountaintop in what was, at the time, the most dangerous place in Afghanistan.

To make the film, writer Sebastian Junger teamed up with British photojournalist Tim Hetherington — who, walking the red carpet that night at the Oscars, might as well have been a young actor straight out of central casting: tall, handsome, charismatic.

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Europe
3:37 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

Large Police Presence Surrounds Margaret Thatcher's Funeral

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 8:22 pm

Margaret Thatcher was laid to rest in a funeral attended by dignitaries from around the globe as well as Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip on Wednesday. It's the first funeral of a British politician attended by the Queen since Sir Winston Churchill's in 1965.

Asia
3:37 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

China's Growing Debt Raises Alarms

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 6:37 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The front page headline on today's Financial Times is ominous - "Warning On Out-Of-Control China Debt." It's about an influential figure in Chinese financial circles, the head of a big accounting firm there and his warning follows similar expressions of concern by the International Monetary Fund and by bond rating firms. Simon Rabinovitch of the Financial Times wrote today's story and he joins us now from Beijing. Welcome to the program.

SIMON RABINOVITCH: Thank you.

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