World News

Middle East
3:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Egypt Is Under A State Of Emergency

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:24 am

It was perhaps the bloodiest day in Egypt since the uprising in 2011. Security forces on Wednesday launched a major operation to clear supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi from two sit-in camps in Cairo but the violence quickly spread to other parts of the city.

Middle East
3:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood Remains Defiant After Crackdown

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:30 am

Hundreds of people were killed in Egypt Wednesday when armed forces cleared protest camps set up by backers of ousted President Morsi. David Greene talks to Steven Cook, senior fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, about the situation in Egypt.

National Security
3:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

How Drones Fundamentally Alter The Nature Of Conflict

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:54 am

The use of drones in the war on terror has been getting a lot of attention. Morning Edition's Renee Montagne talks to author Mark Bowden about his article on the U.S. government's use of drones in this week's The Atlantic magazine. Bowden is the author of Black Hawk Down.

Middle East
3:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Violent Crackdown Spread Beyond Cairo

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:26 am

The deadly confrontations in Egypt on Wednesday were not limited to Cairo. To find out what happened in the Egyptian city of Alexandria, David Greene talks to Mohammed Abushaqra, a civil society advocate.

Africa
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Egypt Government Spokesman: There Wasn't A Peaceful Solution

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Badr Abdel Atty(ph) is the spokesman for Egypt's foreign ministry. He joins us from Cairo now. Welcome to the program.

BADR ABDEL ATTY: Hello, sir.

SIEGEL: And the foreign ministry issued an official statement today regarding the deaths of Egyptians both in Cairo and also around the country. What is that statement? What does the Egyptian government have to say?

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Africa
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Egypt's Military-Backed Government Condemned For Crackdown

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Around the world, there is sharp reaction to the crackdown in Cairo. In Egypt, there is a month-long state of emergency and a nightly curfew. Egyptian riot police moved against supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi in the early hours today. Armored vehicles, helicopters and bulldozers moved on the camps to clear protesters out of two encampments in the capital city. Witnesses describe it as a bloodbath.

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Economy
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Eurozone Growth Doesn't Mean Tough Times Are Over

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

There is a pleasant economic surprise from Europe today. For the last year and a half, the news from Europe has been really bleak; unemployment above 20 percent in a number of countries and no growth. Well, today, new data showed that the eurozone economy actually grew in the second quarter by three-tenths of a percent.

As NPR's John Ydstie reports, though, that doesn't mean tough times are over.

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Asia
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Sub Fire Called India's Worst Naval Disaster In Peacetime

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Hope is fading for any survivors to be found aboard an Indian submarine that sank at port in Mumbai. An 18-man crew was aboard. A massive explosion ripped through the boat as it sat at the naval docks.

As NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from New Delhi, it's being called India's worst naval disaster in peacetime.

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Africa
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Egypt Ambassador: Muslim Brotherhood Chose 'Path Of Exclusion'

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And joining us now is Egyptian Ambassador to the United States, Mohamed Tawfik. Welcome to the program once again.

MOHAMMAD TAWFIK: Thank you very much.

SIEGEL: Today in Cairo, the interim interior minister said that the police were told to fire tear gas only and that they showed restraint. You just heard Leila Fadel's story. You heard descriptions of sniper fire. The two just don't match. How do you square that characterization with what reporters like Leila saw?

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Africa
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Death Toll Mounts In Egypt After Violent Clashes

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Egypt is in turmoil today, with ominous implications for the country's future.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNFIRE)

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Parallels
3:18 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Egypt's Ominous Developments

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood clash with the Egyptian security forces Wednesday in Cairo. In addition to the fighting, the interim government imposed a state of emergency.
Mosaab El-Shamy AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:03 pm

Egypt suffered a day of terrible violence Wednesday, and the bloodshed was compounded by several developments that suggest more confrontations are ahead.

Egypt's security forces reasserted their authority on a number of fronts and gave every appearance that they would press ahead with a crackdown against the Muslim Brotherhood and other opposition groups.

Here are several examples:

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Shots - Health News
12:00 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Violence Causes Doctors Without Borders To Exit Somalia

Somali women and children wait to get medicine in July 2008, from a clinic run by Doctors Without Borders about 20 miles south of Mogadishu.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:05 am

The aid group Doctors Without Borders said Wednesday that it's closing all operations in Somalia after 22 years because of the increase in violent attacks and abuse against its staff.

"This is the most difficult announcement that I've had to make as MSF president," Dr. Unni Karunakara said at a press conference from Kenya. "Respect for humanitarian principles no longer exists in Somalia today."

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Law
11:50 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Past Immigration Policies Had A Reverse Effect, Professor Says

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 12:20 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Books
11:49 am
Wed August 14, 2013

'Happiness, Like Water' Based On Nigerian-American Writer's Reality

Montreux Rotholtz Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 5:43 pm

Nigerian-American author Chinelo Okparanta was shortlisted for this year's prestigious Caine Prize for African Writing. But she says that initially, writing short stories wasn't a style she thought she'd be good at.

"When I started, I thought I was a novelist, and I had written some short stories and I thought that they failed at being whatever short stories should be," Okparanta tells Tell Me More's guest host Celeste Headlee. "I'm not sure how it ended up that I somehow learned to write a short story."

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Parallels
11:13 am
Wed August 14, 2013

French Maker Of Military Rafts Gets An American Identity

U.S. Marines with 4th Force Reconnaissance Company slide off F470 Combat Rubber Raiding Crafts during training in Waimanalo, Hawaii. The French company Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts for roughly two decades. Now the company is making the rafts in the U.S.
Lance Cpl. Reece E. Lodder Marine Corps Base Hawaii

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

For roughly two decades, the Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts. These rafts, especially the high-end model F470, are not the recreational rafts you take out to the lake on a Sunday, says Lionel Boudeau, the head of Zodiac's North America operations.

"It is used for a large variety of missions, like assault landings, infiltration and exfiltration," he says. "It can be deployed from the shore or deployed from the air by an aircraft, a helicopter, by a submarine. It is used by special forces and regular Army."

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Asia
10:28 am
Wed August 14, 2013

On Mount Everest, Sherpa Guides Bear The Brunt Of The Danger

Lhamu Chhiki's husband, Chhewang Nima, summited Mount Everest 19 times. He died while leading a private expedition on Mount Baruntse in 2010.
Courtesy of Grayson Schaffer

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:46 am

The Sherpa people of Nepal have become famous for guiding mountain climbers up some of the world's highest peaks, especially Mount Everest. And while Sherpa guides earn relatively good pay for their work, they and their families pay a price in death and injury. According to Grayson Schaffer, a senior editor and writer for Outside magazine, a Sherpa working above Everest's base camp is nearly 10 times more likely to die than a commercial fisherman, the most dangerous, nonmilitary occupation in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Parallels
9:07 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Blast Aboard Submarine A Blow To Indian Military

A general view of a naval dockyard where a submarine caught fire and sank after an explosion early Wednesday in Mumbai, India.
Rafiq Maqbool AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 10:45 am

The deadly explosion aboard an Indian submarine with 18 sailors on board is the worst loss for the country's navy since its 1971 war with Pakistan, and is seen as a setback to India's modernization of its defense capabilities.

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Parallels
5:26 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Is The Middle East Conflict Getting Even Tougher To Solve?

Israeli-Palestinian peace talks were launched 20 years ago when Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (left), Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat (right) and President Bill Clinton met at the White House on Sept. 13, 1993. But today, some of the issues appear more intractable than ever.
J. David Ake AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:23 am

When the Israelis and Palestinians signed an interim peace agreement on the White House lawn in 1993 amid soaring optimism, the Jewish settlers in the West Bank numbered a little over 100,000.

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Middle East
4:56 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Months-Long Political Crisis In Egypt Erupts Into Violence

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:16 am

Security forces in Cairo have begun to forcibly disband two massive protest camps there. Supporters of ousted Islamist President Morsi have been conducting a sit-in for weeks amid threats of a government crackdown. For details, Renee Montagne talks to Michael Wahid Hanna, an analyst with The Century Foundation.

The Two-Way
4:42 am
Wed August 14, 2013

'Bloodbath' In Cairo As Troops Move On Morsi Supporters

Protesters taunt security forces moving in to clear one protest camp near the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo. The military-backed government described the camps as violent and unlawful.
Hesham Mostafa EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:00 am

  • On 'Morning Edition' just after 10 a.m. ET: NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

(We most recently updated the top of this post at 5:08 p.m. ET.)

In what looks to be the bloodiest day since the July 3 ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, dozens of people in Cairo were killed Wednesday as government forces moved to clear Morsi's supporters from sites where they have been camped.

By evening, the ministry of health reported 275 people had been killed and 2,001 had been injured across the country. The government said 43 policemen had been killed.

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Middle East
3:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

After 5 Years, Mideast Peace Talks To Resume

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Middle East
3:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Security Forces Move In On Egyptian Protests

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:16 am

After days of tense standoff in Cairo, Egyptian security forces began clearing two sit-in camps by supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi. The Interior Ministry, which is in charge of police, warned in a statement that the forces would deal firmly with protesters acting "irresponsibly."

Asia
3:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Rescuers In India Try To Reach Sailors Trapped In Submarine

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In India, rescuers are trying to reach 18 sailors feared trapped in a submarine that caught fire after a massive explosion in Mumbai last night. The defense ministry said at least some of those on board have been killed. This smoldering sub is in its berth at a highly secured naval base, with only a portion visible above the surface.

This incident comes as a setback for India, just as the country is trying to beef up its military. And for more, we're joined by NPR's Julie McCarthy from New Delhi. Julie, good morning.

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Parallels
1:00 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Brazilians Flood To U.S. On Massive Shopping Sprees

Camila DeSouza, a 17-year-old Brazilian, shops for shoes at a mall in Sunrise, Fla., on July 16, 2012. During their winter, Brazilians flock to the U.S., mainly to shop. Even with the cost of airfare figured in, many products are far cheaper in the U.S. than in Brazil.
Charles Trainor Jr. Miami Herald/MCT /Landov

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 5:26 pm

What's the busiest U.S. Consulate in the world? If you guessed in Mexico or China, you'd be wrong.

It's actually in Brazil, Sao Paulo to be exact. The consulate there is giving a record number of visas to Brazilians who want to visit the U.S. And that is giving a boost to the economies of cities like Miami.

On a recent day, Tiago Dalcien and his girlfriend stand outside the U.S. Consulate in Sao Paulo clutching their passports and other documents. He is a 30-year-old banker; his girlfriend is a doctor.

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The Salt
4:44 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

In Iraq, Laying Claim To The Kebab

Many different Middle Eastern cultures claim to have invented the kebab.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 7:54 pm

When you hear the word "kebab" in America, you might think of skewers with chunks of chicken or beef and vegetables, marinated and grilled on coals or gas. But say "kebab" in the Middle East, and it means a lot of things — chunks of lamb or liver on skewers, or the more popular version of grilled ground meat logs found in Turkey, Iran and much of the Arab world.

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Middle East
2:33 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Sinai Peninsula Sees Increasing Violence Since Morsi Takeover

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:22 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In 2011, when demonstrators took to the streets of Cairo in peaceful protest against then-President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians in the Sinai Peninsula staged attacks on police stations. And while Cairo is still the scene of political conflict, in the Sinai, the conflict remains extremely violent.

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Middle East
2:33 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Israel Plans To Release Palestinian Prisoners Ahead Of Peace Talks

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:22 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Canada Revokes License Of Company In Quebec Rail Disaster

The railway company whose train derailed and exploded in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, last month can no longer operate in Canada. An image shows the scene one week after the disaster.
Ian Willms Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 11:54 am

The railway whose crude oil-carrying train derailed and exploded in the center of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, last month can no longer operate in Canada, the country's Transportation Agency says. The disaster resulted in more than 40 deaths and the destruction of many of the town's central buildings.

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The Two-Way
10:16 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Row Over The Rock: Britain And Spain Feud Over Gibraltar

A dispute over fishing rights at Gibraltar has grown into an international spat between Britain and Spain. Here, cars sit in line at the border crossing between Spain and Gibraltar earlier this month.
Marcos Moreno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 11:21 am

Tensions over fishing rights and border checks are driving officials in Spain and Britain to consider legal options in their newly escalated dispute over the status of Gibraltar.

In recent weeks, Spain has insisted on performing comprehensive border checks that slow traffic to Gibraltar, a rocky outcropping of land at the southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula, in a move seen as an answer to Gibraltar's creation of a concrete reef in disputed waters.

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The Salt
8:49 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Why Urban Beekeeping Can Be Bad For Bees

Beehive designer Johannes Paul (right) and Natural England's ecologist Peter Massini, with a brood frame colonized with bees from the "beehaus" beehive on the roof of his house in London in 2009.
Sang Tan AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:27 pm

Two British scientists are dumping cold water on campaigns to promote urban beekeeping. They say that trying to "help the bees" by setting out more hives is naive and misguided if the bees can't find enough flowers nearby to feed on. You'll just end up with sick and starving bees.

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