World News

Parallels
8:09 am
Thu September 19, 2013

An Indian Terrorism Case, With Links To Informal Cash Transfers

An Afghan dealer waits for customers at a money market in Kandahar province, in November 2012. The U.S. has started attacking the Taliban's funding channels ahead of withdrawing most of its forces from Afghanistan by 2014.
Ahmad Nadeem Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:41 pm

Police in India arrested the co-founder of an organization blamed for terrorist attacks across the country. But it was the revelations following the August arrest of Yasin Bhaktal, the alleged head of the Indian Mujahideen, that caught our eye.

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The Two-Way
5:09 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Death Toll At 80 And Likely To Rise As Storms Slam Mexico

Near the town of Petaquillas, Mexico, a man held on to a line Wednesday as he crossed a stream swollen by rain dumped by the storm Manuel.
Alejandrino Gonzalez AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 6:54 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': Host Renee Montagne talks with the AP's Michael Weissenstein

Mud slides, flash floods and rising waters are proving to be a deadly combination in the mountains near Acapulco, Mexico, where dozens of people have died in recent days as a tropical storm-turned hurricane pummels the area.

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Europe
1:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

France Moves To Ban Kids Under 16 From Beauty Pageants

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The French Senate voted to ban beauty pageants for children under 16. The measure is part of a larger bill on women's rights.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that lawmakers see this move as a way to protect the young from being sexualized.

(SOUNDBITE OF A DOCUMENT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (French spoken)

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Analysis
1:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Feds Say NYC Building Is A Front For Iran

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In the last few days we've learned that Iran has released political prisoners and that its new president and President Obama have written each other. Also suggesting a thaw in the relationship, both leaders expressed a desire to resolve their countries' dispute over Iran's nuclear program. These seeming overtures come as President Hassan Rouhani prepares to fly to New York to address the U.N.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Latin America
1:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

More Rain On The Way For Stranded Acapulco Tourists

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

An unusual double whammy hit Mexico this week, with hurricanes slamming into both coasts, Ingrid in the east and Manuel in the west. More than 80 people have died amid mudslides and flooding. Some of the worst damage has been along the Pacific coast around the famous resort town of Acapulco, where tens of thousands of tourists have been stranded. And it looks like more rain is on the way.

Associated Press reporter Michael Weissenstein is on the line from Acapulco. Thank you for joining us.

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Sports
1:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Afghan Soccer Team's Win Fuels National Pride

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Soccer was banned in Afghanistan under the Taliban. Today it's fueling a week-long party. Afghans are over the moon since their national team won the South Asian Football Federation championship last week. It was a stunning victory over India, two to nothing, especially for a team of unpaid players who slept in airports on the way to tournaments because they could not afford hotel rooms.

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It's All Politics
4:21 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Poll: Half Of Americans See Russia As 'Unfriendly' Or Worse

President Obama meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Northern Ireland on June 17. A new Gallup poll says Americans are increasingly viewing both Putin and Russia less favorably.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 5:08 pm

During the 2012 presidential race, Republican Mitt Romney was mocked by President Obama during a debate for calling Russia — and not al-Qaida — the "No. 1 geopolitical foe" of the United States.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Good Samaritan Could Get Unclaimed Lotto Jackpot In Spain

Women in Barcelona check their numbers for Spain's Christmas lottery, named "El Gordo" (Fat One), in 2012.
Josep Lago AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 4:10 am

A city in northwest Spain issued a rather unusual lost-and-found notice this week:

FOUND: A lottery ticket bought more than a year ago, which entitles the owner to an unclaimed $6.3 million jackpot.

LOST: The ticket's owner.

From its El Gordo ("The Fat One") Christmas lottery, to the summertime EuroMillions drawing, Spain is a country obsessed with playing the lottery — especially in a dismal economy.

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Middle East
3:00 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Turkey's Detente With Kurdish Militants On Verge Of Collapse

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The conflict in Syria is causing problems for its neighbors beyond the violence that's spilling over their borders. In Turkey, which has strongly backed Syrian rebels, one of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's most important political efforts is in danger of collapsing.

NPR's Peter Kenyon reports on dimming hopes for a peace process between Turkey and its Kurdish minority.

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Latin America
3:00 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

A Cable Car Ride Gives Insight Into Rio's 'Pacified' Favelas

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:46 pm

Brazil's favelas, or slums, are notoriously violent places, and in recent years, the Brazilian government has attempted to establish order through police-run "pacification" programs. A cable car ride above several favelas gives a clearer view of what's happened in the communities in recent years.

Latin America
3:00 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Brazil's New Middle Class: A Better Life, Not An Easy One

Roberto de Carvalho (left), who maintains a truck fleet in Recife, Brazil, is shown here with his daughter Sandra, 22, wife Enilda and daughter Susana, 16. The family makes just enough to belong the rapidly expanding ranks of the country's middle class, though they still can't afford a house or even a car.
Melissa Block NPR

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:01 pm

Tens of millions of Brazilians have risen out of poverty over the past decade in one of the world's great economic success stories. The reasons are many: strong overall economic growth, fueled by exports. A rise in the minimum wage. A more educated workforce. And big government spending programs, including direct payments to extremely poor families.

But becoming middle class in Brazil means a better life, not an easy one. The new, lowest rung of the middle class is what in the U.S. would be called the working poor, with monthly incomes of between $500 and $2,000.

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Latin America
2:54 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Brazil's Traffic Is A Circus, So Send In The Clowns

The Brazilian city of Olinda has a novel approach to taming its ever-growing traffic problem: traffic clowns known as palhacos.
Andrea Hsu NPR

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:01 pm

On a busy avenue in Olinda, in northeastern Brazil, two men in wigs, big red noses and full clown makeup are squeaking horns and making a good-natured ruckus.

"Where's your helmet?" shouts one as a motorcyclist whizzes by. "Fasten your seat belt!" calls out the other.

Uncle Honk and Fom Fom are traffic clowns, or palhacos, hired by the city to make the roads a bit safer. They lean into traffic, making exaggerated gestures, like the sweep of the arm to mimic fastening a seat belt, and a mimed reminder to never drink and drive.

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The Two-Way
1:44 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Iran Frees Political Prisoners

Iranian lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh smiles at her house in Tehran on Wednesday, after being freed from prison.
Behrouz Mehri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 3:17 pm

Human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh was among several political prisoners released by Tehran on Wednesday, just days ahead of a visit by Iran's newly elected moderate president to the United Nations in New York.

Sotoudeh, who had been held since 2010, was one of eight women and three men released, according to the BBC. Reformist politician Mohsen Aminzadeh was also among the prisoners freed.

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The Two-Way
12:24 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Russia Says It Will Implicate Syria's Rebels In Chemical Attack

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said Moscow will provide the U.N. Security Council evidence implicated Syrian rebels in a chemical attack.
Alexander Nemenov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 12:58 pm

Russia's top diplomat says his nation will give the U.N. Security Council evidence that implicates Syria's rebel forces in the Aug. 21 chemical weapons attack near Damascus, the BBC reports.

Word of what Syrian President Bashar Assad's strongest ally on the Security Council plans comes from Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov.

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The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

VIDEO: You Will Smile At This Dancing Queen And Her Good Luck

Ellie Cole, in the "dancing queen" video that's made her famous.
YouTube.com

Building on our first feel-good story of the day — "$64,000 Raised So Far For Homeless Man Who Turned In $42,000" — here's another:

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U.S.
10:15 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Latinos 'Not Just A Chapter In U.S. History'

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 3:51 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we'll hear about the songs that keep Cuban-American rapper Pitbull grounded, that is when he's not cranking out his own chart-topping hits. First, though, we want to tell you about a new documentary series that takes a look at the long, some might say, overlooked, history of Hispanics in this country. It's called "Latino Americans."

(SOUNDBITE OF DOCUMENTARY, "LATINO AMERICANS")

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Asia
9:06 am
Wed September 18, 2013

China's Debate: Must The Party Follow The Constitution?

A police officer blocks photos from being taken outside Zhongnanhai, the central headquarters for the Communist Party of China, in Beijing last year.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:01 pm

Several weeks back, officials with the East China University of Political Science and Law met one of its professors, Zhang Xuezhong, at his favorite hangout, a coffeehouse in Shanghai.

Sitting in a private room, they told him he was suspended from teaching for articles he had posted on the Internet. In them, Zhang had argued that China's government needs to build a real rule of law — one to which even the party is accountable — as well as a system of checks and balances.

One way to start, he says, is to live up to the promises made in China's 1982 constitution.

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The Two-Way
8:14 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Several Deaths Reported After Train Hits Bus In Ottawa

Officials monitor the scene of a crash between a passenger train en route to Toronto and a double-decker bus at a crossing in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on Wednesday.
Stephen Morrison EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 10:23 am

A passenger train hit a passenger bus at a railroad crossing around 8:48 a.m ET Wednesday in Canada's capital city and there were fatalities.

Canadian Broadcasting reported initially that "Ottawa fire officials say preliminary figures show 5 dead in bus-train collision. #ViaRail tweets nobody seriously hurt on train."

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World
4:46 am
Wed September 18, 2013

New Zealand Men Give New Meaning To The Words: Beer Tap

With the sponsorship of a brewery, the men rigged a friend's home so that beer flowed from all the taps.

World
4:43 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Why Lilly Collins Is The 'Most Dangerous Celebrity'

Fantasy film star Lily Collins seems harmless but beware of looking for more about the starlet on the Internet. According to antivirus software company McAfee, she is the Most Dangerous Celebrity. Plugging Collins' name into a search engine has a 14 percent chance of turning up a computer virus.

Middle East
3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Evidence In UN Syria Report Makes Regime Most Likely Suspect

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 3:34 pm

UN inspectors have concluded that it was in fact a chemical weapons attack that occurred outside Damascus, Syria on August 23rd. The report does not assign blame for the attack. But according to Peter Bouckaert, Emergencies Director for Human Rights Watch, a careful read of the evidence laid out in the UN report shows the Syrian regime is most likely behind the attack. He talks with Robert Siegel about the UN findings and what they imply.

Latin America
3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Once Considered A Backwater, Northeast Brazil Is Booming

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 3:34 pm

The northeastern part of Brazil used to be considered the backwards part of the country, far from the riches of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo in the south. That's changed in recent years, and today, northeastern Brazil is experiencing an explosion of industry, propelling millions of people out of poverty and into the middle class. Melissa Block talks with businessman Alfredo Bezerra Leite, owner of a bus company and an engineering firm, and his daughter Rebeca Bezerra Leite, to learn about what's behind this growth in the Northeast.

Latin America
3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Brazil President Postpones U.S. Visit After NSA Revelations

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 3:34 pm

In a slap to the United States, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff announced she is postponing her state visit to Washington. It was scheduled for Oct. 23 and would have been the first state visit of President Obama's second term. The postponement follows revelations that the National Security Agency spied on Rousseff, her top aides and Brazil's state-run oil company.

Parallels
3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

As Economy Cools, Brazilians Find Themselves Trapped In Debt

A woman looks at clothes inside a shop in Rio de Janeiro. Consumption has been a huge driver of the Brazilian economy, but the boom years are over, and economists say the outlook isn't good.
Sergio Moraes Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 6:44 pm

It all started out so promisingly. She was young, still in her teens, and she'd landed her first job. As is the custom in Brazil, to get your salary you have to open an account with the bank the company deals with — and with that new account came the woman's first credit card.

"The banks say, 'I want to help you,' " she says. "And if you have a credit card, it's a status symbol, you are well-regarded."

She switched jobs. That company dealt with another bank — which issued her another credit card. She got a store credit card, too.

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The Salt
11:23 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Golden Rice Study Violated Ethical Rules, Tufts Says

Genetically modified to be enriched with beta-carotene, golden rice grains (left) are a deep yellow. At right, white rice grains.
Isagani Serrano International Rice Research Institute

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 4:30 pm

Tufts University announced Tuesday that one of its researchers broke ethical rules while carrying out a study of genetically modified "golden rice" in China.

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Parenting
10:17 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Obesity And Preserving Culture: Latinos Discuss Parenting Challenges

Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 5:38 pm

Health, cultural assimilation and language are some of the top concerns on the minds of a group of Latino parents, social media influencers and regular contributors to Tell Me More. Health was something first lady Michelle Obama highlighted in July, when she addressed the National Council of La Raza, the nation's leading Hispanic civil rights organization.

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Politics
10:17 am
Tue September 17, 2013

How Can Latinos Get More Political Power?

Host Michel Martin kicks off a special broadcast in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, by looking at some of the biggest political stories - in particular those resonating with Latinos. Martin is joined by Democratic strategist Maria Cardona and syndicated columnist Ruben Navarrette.

Parallels
9:06 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Why Is The Global Shipbuilding Business Struggling?

Laborers stand on a new ship at a Rongsheng Heavy Industries shipyard in Nantong, China, in 2012. The troubles at Rongsheng, China's largest private shipbuilder, mirror what's happening in the global industry.
Aly Song Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 10:43 am

There's news this week that shipbuilder STX Finland will close what it describes as "the world's leading ferry builder," a yard where the company also built small cruise ships, icebreakers and naval craft.

The company blamed economic conditions for the closure of the Rauma Shipyard. Work from there will be shifted to the company's facility in Turku. About 700 people will lose their jobs.

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Tue September 17, 2013

WATCH: Time-Lapse Video Of The Costa Concordia Being Righted

The wrecked cruise ship Costa Concordia, now back in an upright position.
Claudio Giovannini EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 12:14 pm

Take a minute if you want a break from the heavy news to see the cruise ship Costa Concordia being brought into an upright position.

Reuters is among several news outlets that have posted time-lapse video, condensing the 19-hour Monday-into-Tuesday operation into about 60 seconds.

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Parallels
4:44 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Why The U.S. Needs Bashar Assad To Stay For Now

President Obama is no longer calling for the ouster of Syrian President Bashar Assad, as the U.S. presses him to dismantle his stockpile of chemical weapons. Assad is shown here on Sept. 8.
AP

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 8:57 am

Throughout the Syrian war, President Obama has insisted that President Bashar Assad must go. But now, the U.S. may want, or even need, Assad to remain in power for a while longer so he can oversee the dismantling of his chemical weapons stockpile.

"For the sake of the Syrian people, the time has come for President Assad to step aside," Obama said back on Aug. 18, 2011, in his first explicit call for Assad's ouster, something the U.S. president went on to repeat on multiple occasions.

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