World News

Middle East
6:02 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Region's Leaders Promise To Protect Iraq's Holy Sites

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 10:43 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

One of the things many countries can agree on is the importance of protecting Iraq's cultural and religious heritage in the midst of this conflict. There are holy sites in the country that have existed for thousands of years.

Last week, Iran's president vowed to cross the border to defend Shiite shrines in Iraq. And thousands of Shia Muslims in India have said they'll do the same. That would widen the conflict even more.

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Europe
5:51 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Sarajevo Celebrates WWI Centennial With Joy And The Macabre

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 10:43 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

I'm Scott Simon. One hundred years ago today, a 19-year-old named Gavrilo Princip fired two shots that rocked the world. He shot and killed the Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, along with the archduchess, Sophie, as they rode a car through Sarajevo.

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Heirs Of The Revolution: A Changing Cuba
3:29 am
Sat June 28, 2014

We Said 'No Car Pictures'

David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 11:34 am

When NPR photographer David Gilkey was headed off to Cuba to shoot some of our stories, I told him, as his photo editor, that there was one cliché he should absolutely avoid: cars.

He talked about it with weekend host Scott Simon (which you can listen to above). Our conversation was a little different.

Kainaz: So David, we sent you to Cuba with one very specific directive: No cars. (Well, that and cigars.) Remember?

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Parallels
3:10 am
Sat June 28, 2014

A Rogue Libyan General Tries To Impose Order With An Iron Fist

Libya's Gen. Khalifa Hifter speaks at a news conference in Abyar, a small town to the east of Benghazi, on May 31. Hifter, a former military officer in Moammar Gadhafi's army, has has launched a self-declared campaign against Muslim extremists. This has won him both supporters and enemies.
Esam Omran Al-Fetori Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 10:43 am

No one is safe in Libya these days. Judges, activists, human rights defenders and former officers in Moammar's Gadhafi's army are being silenced with bullets and knives.

There are no formal security forces, weapons remain unsecured and the economy is foundering because rebels seized oil ports in the east.

For all these reasons, a rogue general with a checkered past has found support in large swaths of the country as he vows to fight what he calls terrorist groups.

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The Two-Way
5:20 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Ukraine Extends Cease-Fire With Pro-Russia Separatists

The Ukraine government today extended a weeklong cease-fire with pro-Russia separatists for another three days.

The announcement on President Petro Poroshenko's website said that Ukraine forces would stand down for an additional 72 hours, until 10 p.m. Monday.

The Associated Press says:

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The Two-Way
4:25 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Armed Drones Over Baghdad To Protect U.S. Forces, Pentagon Says

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 5:30 pm

The Pentagon says armed U.S. drones are in the skies over Baghdad, protecting American forces deploying there to assess the security situation amid a Sunni insurgency.

Unarmed reconnaissance drones have been flying 30 to 35 sorties per day for the past week or so.

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The Two-Way
3:52 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Norway Does A Ctrl+Alt+Delete On E-Voting Experiment

During the 2013 elections, online voting was an option in Norway. Even so, Erna Solberg, chairman of the Conservative Party of Norway, casts an old-school ballot.
NTB Scanpix Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:48 pm

After a two-year trial for Internet voting, Norway is pulling the plug.

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The Salt
3:39 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Got Leftovers To Share? In Germany, There's A Website For That

Europeans throw away 90 million tons of food each year, including these vegetables pulled from waste bins of an organic supermarket in Berlin. A new German website aims to connect surplus food with people who want it.
Fabrizio Bensch Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 8:46 am

Child psychiatrist Vero Buschmann says she was looking for a way to get rid of leftovers without having to throw them away. At the same time, the Berlin resident wanted to meet new people.

She found a nonprofit website in Germany that allows her to do both. On a recent evening, her doorbell rings and she buzzes Franzi Zimmerman in to her fifth-floor apartment.

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The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

In Iraq, Coordination With Iran Not Impossible, Gen. Dempsey Says

Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey speaks during a news conference at the Pentagon in December.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:33 pm

In an interview with All Things Considered, Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, declined to rule out coordination with Iran and Iranian-backed forces in Iraq. Dempsey also told NPR that one option in Iraq might involve U.S. air assets going after "high-value" individuals within the main Sunni insurgent group.

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Sports
2:30 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Once Bitten, Twice Decried: Uruguay Outraged By Suarez Punishment

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:33 pm

Luis Suarez's sponsors are dropping him, his future at his team Liverpool is in doubt and his 2014 World Cup is over. FIFA dealt the Uruguayan soccer player an unusually harsh sentence for biting his opponent, and his home country is outraged.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Latin America
2:30 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Bitter Debt Fight Between Argentina And U.S. Set To Reach Climax

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:33 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. For most of the last 14 years, Argentina has been locked in a bitter fight over how much has to pay its international creditors. On Monday, that battle will come to a head. That's the deadline the U.S. Supreme Court set for Argentina to pay off some U.S. hedge funds that had bought its bonds. Argentina says the payments could ruin the country. NPR's Jim Zarroli explains.

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Iraq
2:30 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

For Iraqi Christians, Return To Captured City Is A Fraught Mandate

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:33 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Mosul is northern Iraq's largest city and the takeover by ISIS has prompted an exodus of the last remaining Iraqi Christians there. The seizure raised fears that a thousand years of Christian culture would vanish. But in recent days, some Christian families have returned to Mosul and surrounding villages. And soon they'll be joined by the Archbishop of the Chaldean Church. NPR's Deborah Amos caught up with him in nearby Erbil.

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Iraq
2:30 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Insurgents Draw Westerners To Battle In Iraq And Syria

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:33 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Over years of conflict in Syria, it's estimated that thousands of Westerners have turned up to join the fight. And now some are crossing into Iraq, as well. Last week, an English-language recruitment video from the Sunni extremist group ISIS, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, went viral. In it gun-toting militants called on Muslims in the West joined them.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Europe
2:30 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Ukraine's Latest Turn Toward EU Has Moscow Glowering

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:33 pm

Ukraine's president has signed a historic trade and economic pact with the European Union, a move his predecessor rejected. The conflict that the first rejection sparked still simmers, with violence continuing in the country's east despite a shaky cease-fire.

Parallels
1:52 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

The Shifting Legacy Of The Man Who Shot Franz Ferdinand

Nineteen-year-old Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip fired the shots that killed the heir to the Austro-Hungarian empire, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and his wife, Sophie, during a visit to Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. Depending on whom you ask, he's either a hero or a terrorist.
Historical Archives Sarajevo AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:33 pm

A hundred years ago Saturday, Gavrilo Princip shot the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne. That event triggered World War I, charting the course for the 20th century. Today, the legacy of the Bosnian Serb nationalist remains the subject of intense debate — nowhere more than in Sarajevo itself.

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Shots - Health News
11:08 am
Fri June 27, 2014

A Doctor Tries To Save A 9-Year-Old Stricken With Ebola

Workers with Doctors Without Borders prepare isolation and treatment areas for Ebola patients in Gueckedou, Guinea.
Kjell Gunnar Beraas AP

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 5:46 am

He was a little boy, 9 years old. He and his mother had both been infected with Ebola. She likely caught the virus while washing a deceased Ebola victim, as is often the custom for burials in Guinea. Then she probably infected her child.

Once she began showing symptoms, she and her son were locked in a house for four days because neighbors were so scared of the virus. Medical workers learned of the case. And the mother and son were driven to a treatment center in the back of a pickup truck, along a dirt road.

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Sports
10:25 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Are Americans Bothered By Soccer?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And I do want to mention that we reached out to the church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and they said their response to the situation was explained in the letter that was sent to Kelly that we talked about on the program, and they have no further comment.

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Latin America
4:58 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Travel Freedom Raises Questions About U.S. Policies Toward Cuba

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 10:47 am

After being away for decades, many members of the first generation of Cuban-American exiles are returning to their native land. But there are still many uneasy with the relaxed travel restrictions.

Iraq
3:10 am
Fri June 27, 2014

ISIS Forged A Coalition To Seize Much Of Iraq, How Solid Is It?

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 7:28 am

Steve Inskeep talks to counterterrorism expert David Kilcullen, a former adviser to the U.S. military in Iraq, and journalist Rania Abouzeid, who has tracked the rise of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

Europe
3:10 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Refugees From Eastern Ukraine Wonder When They Can Go Home

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 5:59 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When Ukraine's former president refused to sign a trade agreement with the European Union, he was driven from office. Today in Brussels, Ukraine's new president signed that deal, as did the former Soviet Republics of Georgia and Moldova. Russia still objects and fighting between Ukrainian forces and Russian separatists goes on. The violence has forced thousands of people in eastern Ukraine from their homes. NPR's Corey Flintoff spoke with some of them.

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Sports
3:10 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Despite Losing To Germany, U.S. Advances In World Cup

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 5:59 am

The U.S. men's soccer team moves on to the World Cup's round of 16. They lost to Germany, but advance because Portugal beat Ghana. The team will get to rest a bit before playing Belgium on Tuesday.

Latin America
2:40 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Cuba's Black Market Loosens Government Control Of Information

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 11:20 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Parallels
1:36 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Iraq's Ethnic Kurds See Opportunity In Nation's Chaos

A member of the Kurdish security forces stand guard atop a armored vehicle at Taza district, south of the oil-rich city of Kirkuk, Iraq, Friday, June 20, 2014.
Emad Matti AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 5:59 am

Iraq is in chaos, but the country's ethnic Kurds might come out ahead.

They rule a semi-autonomous area in the north that is fairly prosperous and safe, and as the Iraqi army crumbled before militants this month, Kurdish forces moved in to take long-sought areas that had been under the central government in Baghdad.

The Kurds are now talking about their generations-old dream of independence, but they still face many dangers.

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History
1:23 am
Fri June 27, 2014

A Century Ago In Sarajevo: A Plot, A Farce And A Fateful Shot

The Austro-Hungarian archduke and his wife, Sophie, board a car just prior to his assassination in Sarajevo.
AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 8:57 am

The shot that killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary was fired a hundred years ago this weekend.

The assassination in Sarajevo, on June 28, 1914, triggered World War I and changed the course of the 20th century. The consequences of that act were devastating. But the beginning of the story sounds almost like a farce — complete with bad aim, botched poisoning and a wrong turn on the road.

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Asia
1:22 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Clock Is Ticking For Aung San Suu Kyi's Presidential Bid

Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi speaks during a public rally in Yangon, Myanmar, on May 17. Democracy activists joined Suu Kyi to call for an amendment to Myanmar's constitution, a move she says is necessary if next year's general elections are to be free and fair.
Gemunu Amarasinghe AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 6:31 am

Time is running out for Myanmar's opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, in her bid to become president.

The long-serving political prisoner and democracy activist is now 67. If she wins general elections next year, she could become Asia's most famous politician.

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The Two-Way
3:21 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Obama Asks For $500 Million To Train, Equip Syrian Rebels

Rebel fighters drink tea on the front line of Ramouseh, near the Aleppo Artillery School. President Obama has requested $500 million to arm and train "moderate" Syrian rebel groups.
Hosam Katan Reuters/Landov

President Obama has asked Congress for $500 million to train and equip moderate Syrian rebels who are seeking the ouster of Bashar Assad.

If Congress approves the plan, it would supplement a covert training and assistance program already being run by U.S. intelligence agencies, The Associated Press says.

The White House says in a statement that the rebels would be vetted before providing assistance, to ensure that U.S. equipment doesn't fall into the wrong hands.

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Sports
2:44 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

For German Fans In Berlin Beer Garden, National Pride Is No Problem

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 5:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Of course, today's match drew big crowds in both the United States and Germany. We first go to NPR Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson in Berlin, who joined scores of Germans at a beer garden to watch the game on three screens outside.

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, BYLINE: Most Germans are uncomfortable displaying national pride because they are sensitive about their country's notorious history. But they make an exception during World Cup season, and today, thousands of Berliners carried German flags.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD AT BEER GARDEN)

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Latin America
2:20 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

The Young Cuban Who's Bringing Activism In Line With The Revolution

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 5:10 pm

Morning Edition host David Greene talks to Melissa Block about his recent reporting trip to Cuba. Specifically, he speaks about a young man named Isbel Diaz Torres, a new kind of Cuban activist. Greene argues that Torres' interests serve to extend Cuba's socialist revolution, rather than oppose it.

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Middle East
2:20 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Crowded By Two Shaky States, Turkey Shifts Its Weight In Policy

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 5:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The fighting is so bad in Iraq that yesterday NATO promised to defend member country Turkey from any spillover violence. Turkey borders two countries that some analysts now call failed states, Iraq and Syria. That's forcing Turkey to consider policies that could change the map of the region, even the possibility of more independence for Iraqi Kurds. That's something Turkey has vehemently opposed for decades. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Istanbul.

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Africa
2:20 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Remembering Salwa Bugaighis, The Libyan Advocate Who Took On Ghadafi

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 5:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Now, sobering news out of Libya - a prominent rights activist was shot and stabbed to death in her home last night. Salwa Bugaighis was a lawyer from Benghazi who had opposed former dictator Muammar Gaddafi. Today, U.S. National Security Advisor Susan Rice issued a statement lauding her courage and leadership. NPR's Leila Fadel had visited Bugaighis just recently, and has this report.

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