World News

The Two-Way
10:28 am
Fri July 4, 2014

German Held On Suspicion Of Passing Classified Information

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 5:46 pm

German authorities have arrested a man, who media reports say worked for the country's spy agency, for allegedly passing intelligence to the United States.

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The Two-Way
7:25 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Clashes Erupt In Jerusalem Over Palestinian Teen's Funeral

A Palestinian throws a stone during clashes with Israeli police after prayers on the first Friday of the holy month of Ramadan in East Jerusalem on Friday. The clashes came ahead of the funeral of a slain Palestinian teenager.
Baz Ratner Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 5:34 pm

Update at 3:36 p.m ET

Israeli police clashed Friday with Palestinians in East Jerusalem, as Palestinians buried an Arab teenager they say was killed by Israeli extremists.

Protesters threw rocks at police who responded with stun grenades, The Associated Press reports. About 30 Palestinians and 13 Israeli officers were injured in the clashes.

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The Two-Way
6:32 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Ex-Editor Gets 18 Months In U.K. Phone Hacking Case

Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson arrives for the sentencing at the Old Bailey court house in London on Friday. He was jailed for 18 months for being complicit in phone-hacking by journalists at the Rupert Murdoch tabloid he edited.
Neil Hall Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 8:12 am

Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson, who was found guilty last week of conspiracy to hack personal voicemails, was jailed Friday for 18 months.

NPR's Ari Shapiro is reporting on the case for our Newscast unit. Here's what he said:

"During sentencing, the judge said phone hacking by journalists at Rupert Murdoch's News International picked up 'intensely personal' messages that caused people 'serious distress.'

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Europe
4:21 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Fighting In Eastern Ukraine Is Described As Fierce But Indecisive

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 5:52 am

Diplomats are trying to arrange a new ceasefire in eastern Ukraine. But Ukraine's president is under domestic pressure to take decisive military action against pro-Russian separatists.

Around the Nation
3:16 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Border Patrol Maintains Silence After Shootings

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 5:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Another federal court ruling this week cast more attention on the U.S. Border Patrol. An appeals court said the family of a Mexican teenager can sue the Border Patrol agent who shot and killed their son. The court set aside a claim that U.S. law should not apply since the agent was shooting from the American side of the border while the teen was on Mexican soil. As we heard on the program earlier this year, my colleague Steve Inskeep visited the site of that shooting with the mother of teen victim.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Middle East
3:06 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Emotions Are Raw After Israeli And Palestinian Teens Are Killed

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 5:52 am

Tensions intensified after the kidnapping and killing of 3 Israeli teens, and the apparent retribution murder of a Palestinian teen. David Greene talks to ex-U.S. Ambassador to Israel Daniel Kurtzer.

Business
3:05 am
Fri July 4, 2014

2010 World Cup Helped South Africa Attract Latin American Tourists

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 5:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:05 am
Fri July 4, 2014

China's President Visits South Korea, Snubs North Korea

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 5:52 am

China's president is in Seoul to meet his South Korean counterpart. In a not-so-veiled gibe at North Korea, the two leaders repeated their opposition to nuclear weapons on the Korean Peninsula.

Parallels
1:33 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Damming The Mekong River: Economic Boon Or Environmental Mistake?

Nearly everyone fishes for a living on Laos' Don Sadam Island, near the site of the controversial Don Sahang dam. Locals and environmentalists alike are worried about the dam's effects on fish migration.
Michael Sullivan NPR

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 8:50 am

It's 9 a.m. and the Mekong River at this hour is still peaceful: just a few fishermen casting nets into a large pool below the area called Si Phan Don, or "4,000 islands."

It's a popular tourist destination in Laos, where Southeast Asia's most storied river splits into nearly a dozen channels before coming together again below the islands of Si Phan Don, for the journey to Cambodia, Vietnam and the South China Sea. Cambodia is on my left, Laos to the right.

Suddenly, my guide points and says, "There!"

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Shots - Health News
6:19 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

As Ebola Cases Spike, WHO Asks For More Money And Help

Lack of awareness about Ebola has fueled the outbreak in West Africa. Here, two Liberian women in Lofa read a pamphlet about how to prevent the spread of the virus.
Ahmed Jallanzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 5:09 am

The world's largest Ebola outbreak continues to surge at a troubling rate. The number of cases has climbed by nearly 20 percent in the past week, the World Health Organization said Tuesday.

At least 759 people have caught the hemorrhagic fever and 467 of those have died in three West African countries since March.

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Parallels
3:19 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Deportation Threat Doesn't Diminish Young Migrants' U.S. Hopes

Ezequiel Vazquez and his 15-year-old son, Ilbaro, leave a government-run shelter in Guatemala City. Ilbaro was deported from the U.S. after spending six months in a Texas detention facility. He returned with a U.S.- issued duffel bag full of clothes, shoes, books and toys.
Carrie Kahn NPR

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 9:23 pm

The Obama administration says it will try to speed up deportations of tens of thousands of children who have illegally entered the U.S. from Central America in recent months. It's part of a stronger message the administration is hoping gets back to would-be migrants contemplating coming to the U.S.

But the message isn't getting through, and even those who have recently been deported say they will try again.

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Latin America
2:42 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Tiny Costa Rica Is A World Cup Surprise — Even To Its Own Fans

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:26 pm

Costa Rica entered into the World Cup an underdog, but the team has emerged from group play having beaten three former World Cup winners. Costa Rican fan Ericka Mora speaks with Melissa Block from San Jose about the excitement in the country's capital.

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Iraq
2:25 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

If Map Of Middle East Is Being Redrawn, What Lies Ahead For Kurds?

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:26 pm

Violence in Iraq has many wondering if the map of the Middle East is being redrawn before the world's eyes. If so, Iraqi Kurds might stand to gain, with an independent Kurdistan finally within reach. Fuad Hussein, a strategist for the Kurdistan Regional Government, joins Robert Siegel to speak about Kurds' hopes and fears.

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Middle East
2:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Iran Nuclear Negotiations Try To Hurdle Impasse As Deadline Nears

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Iranian and American diplomats are facing a July 20th deadline to come up with a nuclear agreement. A deal could prevent any Iranian attempt to build a bomb. Failure could bring back the mutual hostility of the past. As NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Vienna, nuclear fuel, uranium, is the crucial issue.

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Europe
2:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

The Long, Slow Vanish Of Britain's Illustrious Recording Clubs

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Tape recording clubs were once a big thing in Britain. People would record all sorts of stuff - sounds of nature, music, plays. And then they'd meet to share their audio treasures. Well, over the years, those clubs have slowly disappeared. Christopher Werth took his own microphone to record what's left of them.

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Iraq
2:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

For Militants, Founding Of Caliphate Is Win In Rhetoric, Not Reality

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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The Two-Way
12:23 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Chinese Leader's Seoul Visit Seen As Snub To North Korea

Chinese President Xi Jinping (right) and South Korean President Park Geun-hye greet children waving the two countries' national flags at the presidential Blue House in Seoul on Thursday. Xi has yet to visit North Korea.
Kim Hong-ji Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 1:12 pm

In a sign that China and South Korea are moving closer together, possibly at North Korea's expense, Beijing and Seoul have said they are close to a free-trade deal and issued a joint statement that they firmly oppose nuclear weapons on the Korean Peninsula.

The announcement on Thursday comes amid North Korean missile tests and a visit to South Korea by Chinese leader Xi Jinping that carries with it an implied snub to Pyongyang: It's his first visit to the Korean Peninsula and the first that a Chinese head of state has stopped in the South before visiting the North.

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The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

U.S. Spying Allegations Chafe An Already Angry India

U.S. Sen. John McCain leaves a meeting with India's foreign minister Wednesday in New Delhi.
Manish Swarup AP

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 1:24 pm

Aiming for a fresh start in troubled U.S.-India relations, U.S. Sen. John McCain met with newly elected Prime Minister Narendra Modi today in New Delhi. But McCain's two-day visit was overshadowed by reports that the U.S. National Security Agency was granted permission in 2010 to spy on Modi's political party.

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World
11:41 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Israeli And Palestinian Parents: 'We Need To Stop This Madness'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Iraq
3:28 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Militant Group In Iraq Proves It's Learned From Al Qaida's Mistakes

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 9:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Latin America
3:25 am
Thu July 3, 2014

World Cup Play Helps Colombian Team Shed Bad Reputation

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 9:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Colombia's national men's soccer team is heading to the quarter-finals of the World Cup. That's a first. And as John Otis reports, the team's winning streak is helping the Colombian soccer emerge from a history of disappointment and also drug-fueled violence.

JOHN OTIS, BYLINE: Colombia has handily won all four of its World Cup games.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: (Shouting in foreign language).

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NPR Story
3:18 am
Thu July 3, 2014

In Iraq's Sacred City Of Najaf, Clerics Call On Shiites To Fight

Iraqi Shiite volunteers with the Labayk ya Hussein Brigade take part in a training session in the holy city of Najaf in late June. Clerics in the city called for Shiites to step forward and fight the Sunni group formerly known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (which now calls itself simply the Islamic State).
Haidar Hamdan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 11:08 am

Sunni militants claimed vast swaths of Iraq last month, thanks largely to the collapse of the Iraqi army.

But three weeks later, the army has been able to win back some territory. The gains come after a call to arms by Shiite religious leaders in the holy city of Najaf, where deep emotion and symbolism are inspiring Shiite volunteers.

Najaf is home to the ancient Valley of Peace cemetery, which seems crowded. Miles of desert stretch under blistering sun, the gilded domes of mausoleums pressed up against the dusty headstones of the ordinary dead.

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Parallels
1:14 am
Thu July 3, 2014

For Once, The U.S., Russia And Iran Actually Agree On Something

Iraqi policemen take up positions on a bridge north of Baghdad on Monday. There's a consensus among Western and Middle Eastern states that militants from the Islamic State pose a serious threat to the region. But there's no sign yet that countries like the United States, Russia and Iran are prepared to work together.
Ahmed Saad Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 12:05 pm

The ferocious charge across much of Iraq by militants now calling themselves the Islamic State has created something almost unheard of in the highly divisive Middle East: international consensus.

The U.S. and its allies, as well as some American rivals, including Russia and Iran, are all opposed to the Sunni group formerly known as ISIS, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, noted Rachel Bronson, a Mideast expert with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

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Shots - Health News
1:08 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Chikun-What? A New Mosquito-Borne Virus Lands In The U.S.

Sick with chikungunya, Karla Sepulveda, 5, waits in a public hospital with her grandmother in Boca Chica, Dominican Republic, on May 15. The Caribbean nation has reported more than 100,000 cases this year.
Ezequiel Abiu Lopez AP

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 9:14 am

Pediatrician Jennifer Halverson will never forget her 36th birthday.

The St. Paul native was volunteering at a maternity clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. She felt great — she went to her job that day and then out to dinner with friends.

But when she got home and went to sleep that night in May, something didn't feel right.

"Then I woke up at 3 in the morning," she says, "and what struck me the most was that my shoulders were on fire. It was like I was being stabbed in both shoulders."

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Parallels
3:18 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

A Scottish Yarn: A Knit In Time Saves The Fabric Of Shetland Life

Ingrid Eunson sits at the spinning wheel in her home in the small town of Brae in Scotland's remote Shetland Islands. She knits yarn that she spins and dyes herself, traditions that her ancestors practiced for generations.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:20 pm

Drive around the Shetland Islands in the far north of Scotland, and at least one thing is immediately apparent: It's home to a lot of sheep. They're everywhere — wandering along the roadsides and on beaches.

In fact, there are some 400,000 of them in Shetland, where the ovine inhabitants outnumber the human ones 20 to 1.

So if you're invited to someone's home for dinner, lamb will likely be on the table. And if you're wearing a local scarf or mittens, chances are it was made out of Shetland wool.

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Shots - Health News
3:06 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Can We Predict Which Teens Are Likely To Binge Drink? Maybe

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 4:07 pm

More than half of 16-year-olds in the United States have tried alcohol. While many of them learn to drink responsibly, some go on to binge on alcohol, putting themselves at risk for trouble as adults. Researchers still aren't sure why that is.

But it may be possible to predict with about 70 percent accuracy which teens will become binge drinkers, based on their genetics, brain function, personality traits and history, according to a study published Wednesday in Nature.

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Middle East
2:21 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

In War's Looming Shadow, Gazans Hope Peace Will Hold

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:20 pm

For more on the Palestinian reaction to recent tensions with Israel, Robert Siegel speaks with Mkhaimer Abu Sada, a political science professor at Al-Azhar University in Gaza City. He expresses Gazans' frustrations with the Palestinian Authority and their concerns about another war with the Israelis.

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Middle East
2:06 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Palestinian Teen's Death Dredges Fears Of Reciprocal Violence

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Tensions are high in Jerusalem. Yesterday, Israel buried three teenagers killed in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. The country vowed action against the militant group Hamas. Hours later, the body of a Palestinian teen was found in Jerusalem. The Obama administration has condemned the murders. We're going to get a view from Gaza on the increasing tensions, but first Daniel Estrin has this report from Jerusalem.

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Parallels
1:42 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Ask Me Anything: Mideast Correspondent Emily Harris Answers

Emily Harris is NPR's international correspondent based in Jerusalem.
Stephanie Federico NPR

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 4:25 pm

Just over a year ago, NPR's Emily Harris packed up and moved to Jerusalem, where she covers plenty of politics and everything else related to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

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Shots - Health News
11:04 am
Wed July 2, 2014

With Help From Extinct Humans, Tibetans Adapted To High Altitude

A mother and daughter herd their yaks along a highway on the Tibetan plateau.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 3:15 pm

At an altitude of nearly 3 miles, the Tibetan plateau is an extreme place to live. It's cold, it's hard to grow food, and there's about 40 percent less oxygen in the air than there is at sea level.

Somehow, though, native Tibetans are adapted to it. Their bodies — and their blood in particular — work differently than those of people used to lower altitudes. The Tibetans' advantage might be thanks to an ancient inheritance.

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