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Media
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

What Glenn Greenwald Could Gain From New Media Venture

Glenn Greenwald, who first reported the disclosures of U.S. surveillance programs, is now leaving The Guardian to work with eBay founder Pierre Omidyar on a new journalism venture.
Silvia Izquierdo AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:58 am

Glenn Greenwald, who broke the story about the U.S. government's massive surveillance program, is quitting The Guardian. He's leaving the British daily and joining a journalism startup with eBay founder and billionaire philanthropist Pierre Omidyar.

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World
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Saudi Act Of Protest Stuns U.N., And Some Observers

The U.N. Security Council votes on a resolution requiring Syria to give up its chemical weapons last month in New York. Last week, Saudi Arabia turned down a chance to take a seat on the Council.
Craig Ruttle AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:58 am

Known for quiet diplomacy, Saudi Arabia is taking an unusual and very public step to protest the international community's failure to resolve the crisis in Syria and other issues that interest Riyadh.

On Thursday, Saudi Arabia was elected to become a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, which the Saudi ambassador to the U.N. initially called a defining moment in his nation's history.

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The New And The Next
4:04 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

The New And The Next: Punk Rock Love, A Sensible Scary Movie

Courtesy of Ozy

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 8:30 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

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The Two-Way
12:37 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

Violin Said To Have Been On The Titanic Sells For $1.6M

This violin is said to have been played by bandmaster Wallace Hartley during the final moments before the sinking of the Titanic. It's thought he put the instrument in that leather case. Hartley's body and the case were found by a ship that responded to the disaster. Now the violin has been sold.
Peter Muhly AFP/Getty Images

An anonymous buyer on Saturday paid about $1.6 million for a violin believed to have been played by one of the musicians who famously stayed aboard as the Titanic sank in the icy waters of the North Atlantic in April 1912.

The Associated Press writes that "the sea-corroded instrument, now unplayable, is thought to have belonged to bandmaster Wallace Hartley, who was among the disaster's more than 1,500 victims."

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Sat October 19, 2013

190-Plus Nations In 23 Years For World's 'Most Traveled' Man

Mike Spencer Bown in Mogadishu, Somalia, in December 2010.
Mustafa Abdi AFP/Getty Images

Mike Spencer Bown's latest Facebook post has him in Cork, Ireland, which means he isn't quite finished wandering the world.

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The Two-Way
7:42 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Girl's Deportation Was Mishandled, But Legal, French Say

Leonarda Dibrani, 15, on Friday in Mitrovica, Kosovo.
Visar Kryeziu AP

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 10:07 am

"An interior ministry investigation into the controversial deportation of a Roma schoolgirl from France has found that her deportation was lawful, but said police could have used better judgment in the case," France 24 is reporting.

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Asia
4:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Chinese Edict Against 'Rumors' Puts Popular Bloggers At Risk

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:54 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. In the United States, a Tweet or YouTube video that goes viral can make a career. In China, that can be dangerous. Last month, the Chinese government issued a new edict forbidding the spreading of rumors against the Chinese government. People who intentionally post what the government considers a rumor violate the law if they get 500 or more reposts or 5,000 or more views.

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Economy
4:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

What The World Thinks Of The Dollar In Light Of Recent Politics

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:40 am

The political instability over funding the U.S. government and raising the debt ceiling could have international financial implications. Host Scott Simon speaks with Matthew Goodman of the Center for Strategic and International Studies about how emerging economies view the dollar after the current debt crisis.

Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Why Scientists Are Trying Viruses To Beat Back Bacteria

Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that causes severe diarrhea, can be difficult to treat with antibiotics.
Stefan Hyman University of Leicester

Not all viruses are bad for us. Some of them might even help up us fight off bacterial infections someday.

Naturally occurring viruses called bacteriophages attack specific types of bacteria. So researchers at the University of Leicester decided to try and take advantage of phages' bacteria-destroying powers to treat infections with Clostridium difficile, a germ that that can cause severe diarrhea and inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract.

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Parallels
2:43 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Desperation Outweighs Dangers For Europe-Bound Migrants

Migrants arrive in Valletta, the Maltese capital, aboard a patrol boat on Oct. 12, a day after their boat sank, killing more than 30 people, mostly women and children — just the latest deadly migrant tragedy to hit the Mediterranean. Despite Europe's financial crisis illegal immigrants continue to attempt to enter Europe through its southern coastal countries as they seek a better life.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 8:09 pm

Thugs with machetes killed Muhammed's two younger brothers. They were coming for him next.

Lingering violence from an 11-year civil war sent Muhammed fleeing his village in Sierra Leone. He escaped to the coast and paid smugglers to sneak him into the cargo hold of a ship at port. He had no idea where he was going.

"There was no light, no food — nothing for 10 days," he recalls. "I was very hopeless. I'd been in the darkness for 10 days."

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Parallels
2:07 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

In France, Deportation Of Teenage Girl Ignites Fierce Debate

Leonarda Dibrani, 15, holds her sister, Medina, in Mitrovica, Kosovo, on Friday. Police seized Leonarda from a school field trip last week and expelled her and her family from France. The case has prompted protests across France.
Vusar Kryeziu AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 8:09 pm

A 15-year-old schoolgirl is at the center of an emotional debate in France over the country's immigration policies.

Leonarda Dibrani was taken away by police during a field trip with her school class last week and deported along with her parents and five siblings to Kosovo. Many French are outraged at the way she was seized. And whether the deportation was legal or not, many say the action runs contrary to French human rights values.

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The Two-Way
11:08 am
Fri October 18, 2013

India Arrests Crew Of U.S. Ship For Carrying Weapons

Indian policemen escort crew members of a U.S.-owned ship MV Seaman Guard Ohio outside a court in Tuticorin, in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, on Friday.
AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 1:56 pm

The crew of a U.S.-owned ship has been arrested at a port in India for allegedly trying to enter territorial waters illegally carrying what's been described as a "huge cache" of weapons.

The 35 crew members on MV Seaman Guard Ohio, owned by Washington, D.C.-based AdvanFort, were detained on Saturday by the Indian Coast Guard. The vessel is currently at anchor in the port of Tuticorin in the southeastern state of Tamil Nadu.

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Parallels
10:58 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Egypt's Crackdown On Islamists Spreads To Mosques, Charities

A physician collects medical equipment and medicines from the remains of the partially destroyed Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque compound hospital in Cairo on Aug. 15.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 8:09 pm

Mohammed is a teacher, and for the past 17 years, he has also worked with an Islamic charity in Cairo. But a little more than two weeks ago that charity was shut down.

Security forces raided its office, took everything and began searching for the head of the board of directors because he's connected to the Muslim Brotherhood — the Islamist group of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

Mohammed, who asked that only his first name be used, fled.

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TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri October 18, 2013

What Does The Rise Of Super-Fortunes Mean For The Rest Of Us?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 7:40 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Haves And Have-Nots.

About Chrystia Freeland's TEDTalk

Author and politician Chrystia Freeland says economic inequality is growing by leaps and bounds. She charts the rise of today's billionaire plutocrats and wonders what the concentration of wealth means for the rest of us.

About Chrystia Freeland

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TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Is There A Right And A Wrong Way To Help Someone?

Neil Macbeth TED

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 7:40 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Haves And Have-Nots.

About Ernesto Sirolli's TEDTalk

When many aid workers hear about a problem, they get to work. But Ernesto Sirolli says that's naive and counterproductive. He argues that the first step is to listen to the people you're trying to help and tap into their entrepreneurial spirit.

About Ernesto Sirolli

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TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Is 'Patient Capitalism' The Answer To Poverty?

Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 12:35 pm

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Haves And Have-Nots.

About Jacqueline Novogratz's TEDTalk

Jacqueline Novogratz, CEO of Acumen Fund, shares stories of how "patient capitalism" can bring sustainable jobs, goods, services and dignity to the world's poor.

About Jacqueline Novogratz

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TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Can A New Generation Of Africans Fight Corruption?

Andrew Heavens TED

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 7:40 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Haves And Have-Nots.

About George Ayittey's TEDTalk

Ghanaian economist George Ayittey lashes out against corrupt African leaders. He calls on a young, fast "cheetah generation" to take back the continent from complacent bureaucrats he calls hippos.

About George Ayittey

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TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Will The Rest Of The World Catch Up To The West?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 7:40 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Haves And Have-Nots.

About Niall Ferguson's TEDTalk

Historian Niall Ferguson explains why, when it comes to amassing wealth, it's been the West versus the rest for the past 500 years. He suggests six killer apps that promote wealth, stability and innovation — and are now shareable.

About Niall Ferguson

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Parallels
6:05 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Headlines From Around The World

A newsstand in the northern Indian city of Allahabad.
Rajesh Kumar Singh AP

We'll begin with a political scandal in Spain.

The former treasurer of Spain's ruling party said in court Friday that he delivered 7,500 euros in cash to the party's secretary-general, the latest fallout in a political slush fund scandal that has embroiled the Popular Party.

"I delivered the envelope" to Maria Dolores de Cospedal, Luis Barcenas said via videoconference at his trial.

Cospedal has denied the accusation.

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Africa
2:03 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Nigerian Civilians Caught In Crackdown On Islamists

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 10:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Nigeria an Islamist insurgency has claimed thousands of lives, most of them civilians. The Nigerian president imposed a security crackdown last spring in a bid to end the uprising. Now Amnesty International is out with a report warning that more than 950 people have died in military detention in Nigeria in just the first half of this year. And the attacks continue. NPR's West Africa correspondent, Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, reports from, Lagos.

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World
3:03 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Report Estimates 30 Million People In Slavery Worldwide

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 3:54 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Kevin Bales, a professor of contemporary slavery at the University of Hull and lead author of the 2013 Global Slavery Index. The first-time report by the Walk Free Foundation estimates that there are nearly 30 million people in slavery across the globe.

Middle East
3:03 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Did Turkey Sell Out Israeli Agents To Iran?

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:32 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Did Turkey sell out Israeli agents to Iran? Washington Post columnist David Ignatius reports today on a twist in the strained relations between Turkey and Israel. Ignatius writes about something that he says happened in early 2012. At the time, the Turks were still furious over the loss of life two years earlier, when Israeli commandoes had boarded a Turkish flotilla that was bringing humanitarian aid to Gaza.

David Ignatius joins us now to talk about this. Welcome to the program once again.

DAVID IGNATIUS: Thank you, Robert.

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Parallels
1:12 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

India, China Top List Of Nations With Most Slaves

Child laborers wait to be processed at a safe house after being rescued during a raid at a factory in New Delhi by workers from Bachpan Bachao Andolan (Save the Childhood Movement) in June.
Kevin Frayer AP

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 4:45 pm

Nearly 30 million people live in slavery worldwide, with most of them in Asia and Africa, according to a report released Thursday.

The Walk Free Foundation's ranking incorporates factors that include the traditional definition of slavery — owning another person — as well as things such as child marriage and human trafficking.

Here are the highlights of the report:

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Man Survives Botched Hanging; Iran Vows To Try Again

Iranians watch the hanging of a convicted man in the city of Qazvin, northwest of the capital, Tehran, in May 2011.
Hamideh Shafieeha AP

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 11:48 am

Amnesty International is urging Iranian authorities not to go ahead with the execution of a convicted drug smuggler after the man survived a botched hanging last week.

The 37-year-old man, identified as Alireza M, was found alive in a morgue after he was hanged at a jail in the northeast Iranian city of Bojnord.

A news release from Amnesty International says:

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Lao Airliner Crash That Killed 49 Blamed On Bad Weather

Soldiers stand next to pieces of a Lao Airlines plane on Thursday after it crashed into the Mekong River near Pakse, Laos.
Pornchai Kittiwongsakul AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 11:10 am

The crash of a turboprop in southern Laos that killed all 49 people aboard was caused by a violent storm that prompted the pilot to miss a runway and careen into the Mekong River, authorities say.

"Upon preparing to land at Pakse Airport the aircraft ran into extreme bad weather conditions and was reportedly crashed into the Mekong River," the Laos Ministry of Public Works and Transport said in a statement.

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Parallels
5:56 am
Thu October 17, 2013

What The World's Newspapers Are Saying

A newsstand in Rome.
Oded Balilty AP

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 11:02 am

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas' meeting with Pope Francis at the Vatican led the website of Italy's Corriere della Sera newspaper.

At the end of their 25-minute meeting, the pope gave Abbas a pen, which the Palestinian Authority president said he hoped to use "to sign the peace agreement with Israel."

The pope replied: "Hurry, hurry," according to the newspaper.

--

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The Two-Way
3:08 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Kerry Says He Hopes Syria's Chemical Weapons Are Shipped Out Of Region

Secretary of State John Kerry flies over Afghanistan on Oct. 11. He met with President Hamid Karzai to work out an agreement on U.S. presence in the country.
Jacquelyn Martin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 12:11 pm

Syria's chemical weapons could be consolidated and moved out of the country, Secretary of State John Kerry suggested in an interview with NPR.

Weapons inspectors are still in Syria assessing the country's stockpile and how to destroy it, in accordance with a United Nations Security Council resolution approved in September.

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Business
2:38 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Financial Markets React Positively To U.S. Debt Deal

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 8:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And news that Washington has finally reached a deal, averting a potentially catastrophic debt default, is drawing a mixed reaction from the rest of the world.

NPR's Philip Reeves, in London, is watching the markets for us.

PHILIP REEVES, BYLINE: We all know that, at times, the markets can be panicky and irrational. Yet, during this crisis, they held their nerve. Analysts say traders were always pretty confident there would be a last-minute deal. This time, they were right.

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Business
2:38 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Grandma Exodus: German Seniors Look To Poland For Care

Two German women chat in the gardens of a senior care home in Berlin. Germany is grappling with a rapidly aging population: By 2050, almost a third of Germans will be 65 years or older, and a growing "Grandma export" trend has set hands wringing.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 5:43 pm

A handful of German and Polish residents at a nursing home in the Polish mountain town of Szklarska Poreba play a Scrabble-like game using blocks with large letters.

The seniors are tended to by Polish workers who offer a steady supply of smiles, hugs and encouragement.

Leonardo Tegls says such personal attention makes this nursing home, Sun House, special. The 87-year-old Dutch-born immigrant to Germany says he first learned about the Polish nursing home from a TV ad.

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Middle East
2:38 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Experts Debate How Best To Remove Syria's Chemical Weapons

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 8:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

Let's go deeper now into one issue Secretary of State John Kerry raised in my interview with him earlier in the program. The secretary, along with his Russian counterpart, got Syria's Bashar al-Assad to agree to hand over his vast store of chemical weapons. Now, Kerry is suggesting those stockpiles be taken out of Syria.

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