World News

World
10:07 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Northern Nigeria University On Edge After Violence

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We turn now to northern Nigeria where more than 50 teachers and students have been killed in terrorist attacks just in the last month. The group known as Boko Haram, which loosely means Western education is forbidden, is allegedly responsible for these, as well as previous attacks on churches and government institutions. The leader of the extremist Islamist sect has said he fully supports the attacks and has called for more targeting of schools.

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Parallels
9:20 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Latin Drug Bosses And Their Growing American Ties

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:42 am

Latin American cartels are fueled by U.S. drug demand, so their illegal retail networks often stretch throughout America. Mexico's arrest of Miguel Angel Trevino Morales was a reminder that the connections between drug traffickers and the U.S. are not just commercial — they're also personal.

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Snowden Asks For Temporary Asylum In Russia, Says Lawyer

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 9:20 am

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor who leaked a cache of classified documents about U.S. surveillance programs, officially filed for temporary asylum in Russia on Tuesday, a human rights lawyer and WikiLeaks say.

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The Two-Way
4:43 am
Tue July 16, 2013

In Egypt, More Clashes Leave 7 Dead, Hundreds Injured

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi block the Six October bridge on Tuesday in the center of Cairo.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:00 am

After what had been a week of calm, violence returned to the streets of Cairo late Monday into early Tuesday.

NPR's Leila Fadel reports that Egypt's health ministry said seven people were killed and more than 200 were injured as supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi clashed with police. From Cairo, Leila filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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Latin America
3:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Vicious Cartel Leader Arrested In Mexico

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:05 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

One of the most brutal and vicious cartel leaders in Mexico has been arrested. Early yesterday morning, Mexican marines, caught the leader of the notorious Zeta gang organization. The country has killed or captured dozens of kingpins in recent years without managing to bring an end to the high murder rates in many areas.

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Middle East
3:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Syrian Refugees Caught Up In Egypt's Political Crisis

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 1:27 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Egypt, the ouster of President Mohammad Morsi has changed things - not just for Egyptians but also for another group of Arabs living in that country. It's a story of how when one group falls from grace, so do those who are perceived to be its supporters. Under the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt was a safe haven for Syrians fleeing the war in their country.

Now, as NPR's Kelly McEvers reports from Cairo, the power shift in Egypt is putting Syrians in danger.

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Shots - Health News
1:15 am
Tue July 16, 2013

South Africa Weighs Starting HIV Drug Treatment Sooner

A woman waits to get AIDS drugs on April 8 at a clinic in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa, about 55 miles north of Johannesburg. New WHO guidelines say patients should start HIV treatment much earlier, before they become extremely sick.
Stephane de Sakutin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 4:22 am

The World Health Organization has issued revised guidelines saying that people with HIV should be put on antiviral drugs far earlier than was previously recommended. The hope is that most patients would get started on treatment before they begin to get extremely sick.

It's a move that could have huge implications for African nations where millions of people are infected with HIV. In South Africa roughly 5.5 million people are living with HIV — more than any other country in the world. South Africa also has more people in treatment than anywhere else.

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The Salt
3:21 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

In Argentina, Coca-Cola Tests Market For 'Green' Coke

Coca-Cola Life, a new product being rolled out in Argentina with a green label, is being marketed as a "natural" and therefore lower-calorie cola.
Coca-Cola

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 4:40 pm

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The Salt
3:18 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

The Secret To Georgian Grilled Meats? Grapevines And Lots Of Wine

Shashlik cooks on a hot grill. Kakheti, the easternmost province in the Republic of Georgia, is known for meats grilled over grapevines, which burn quickly, leaving a heap of finger-sized coals.
Nick Grabowski via Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:27 pm

Tucked between Russia and Turkey, the Republic of Georgia is renowned for great food: cheese dishes, pickles, breads and stews. This is a cuisine that you should not miss.

And on summer evenings in the capital, Tbilisi, the air is fragrant with the smells of one of Georgian cookery's highlights: grilled meat, or shashlik.

You can find good shashlik at restaurants with white tablecloths, but the very best in all Tbilisi is said to be at a roadside stop called Mtsvadi Tsalamze. It's an unassuming place with rows of wooden picnic tables in an open yard.

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Parallels
2:19 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

A Nonstop Tribute To Nelson Mandela

Well-wishers have gathered outside of Nelson Mandela's hospital to offer their support.
Andy Carvin NPR

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:44 pm

They have assembled in front of the hospital by the dozens: church groups, families, even a motorcycle club, their engines revving at full throttle. Mothers encouraged their shy children to squeeze through the crowd and place a bouquet of flowers at the base of a makeshift shrine. A member of the crowd conducted an impromptu choir, inviting others to join in and sing a hymn together.

For more than a month now, throngs of well-wishers have gathered outside the Mediclinic Heart Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa, praying for the health of former President Nelson Mandela.

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Remembrances
2:17 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

'Night Witch' Flew Bomber Planes During World War II

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 4:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. Nadezhda Popova was known as a Witch of the Night, but instead of a broom, she flew a bomber. Popova was a member of the 588th Night Bomber Regiment, a group of young Russian women who volunteered to fly planes during World War II. The whooshing sound of their aircraft made of wood and canvas and the fact that they only flew in the dead of night inspired German troops to dub them the Night Witches.

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Middle East
2:17 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Israelis, Palestinians Keep Close Eye On Events In Egypt

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 6:44 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Israelis and Palestinians disagree on many things, but both have this in common: They've been closely watching events in Egypt. The change in government there could shake up security and politics across the region. At the center of the uncertainty is Hamas, the Islamist Palestinian movement with close ties to Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood.

NPR's Emily Harris has that story.

EMILY HARRIS, BYLINE: Between Israel's southern border and Cairo, there's the Sinai.

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Author Interviews
1:04 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Christ In Context: 'Zealot' Explores The Life Of Jesus

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:13 pm

Writer and scholar Reza Aslan was 15 years old when he found Jesus. His secular Muslim family had fled to the U.S. from Iran, and Aslan's conversion was, in a sense, an adolescent's attempt to fit into American life and culture. "My parents were certainly surprised," Aslan tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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Parallels
12:37 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

In Venice, Huge Cruise Ships Bring Tourists And Complaints

A massive cruise ships towers over Venice. Some 650 cruise ships now visit the Italian city annually, and critics say they threaten the city's fragile architecture.
Courtesty of the No Big Ships Committee

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 4:13 pm

The fragile architectural treasures of Venice are endangered by rising sea levels, and a growing number of critics now say the city and its canals are at risk from massive cruise ships as big as floating skyscrapers.

On an average day, tens of thousands of passengers lean over the railings of cruise ships that can be 300 yards long and 15 stories high. The tourists peer down at the majestic Doge's Palace as they sail into St. Mark's basin and down the Giudecca canal.

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Parallels
11:27 am
Mon July 15, 2013

New Bangladeshi Law Lets Workers Unionize More Freely

A Bangladeshi garment worker participates in a protest outside the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Export Association office building in the capital, Dhaka, on July 11. The country's Parliament approved a new law that would allow workers to unionize more freely.
A.M. Ahad AP

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 11:55 am

The garment factory collapse in Bangladesh, which killed more than 1,000 people in April, has spurred the Parliament into action.

The legislature approved a law Monday that makes it easier for workers to unionize. The vote comes amid scrutiny of working conditions in the country after the building collapse outside Dhaka, the capital.

The building, Rana Plaza, housed garment factories that churned out products for some of the world's top brands.

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Parallels
10:45 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Datsun's Rebirth In India And The Revival Of Long-Gone Cars

Nissan Motor Co. President and CEO Carlos Ghosn poses with the Datsun Go in New Delhi on Monday. Its the first new Datsun model in more than three decades.
Manish Swarup AP

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World
4:51 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Canadian Town Is Nuts For Taters

Florenceville-Bristol produces about a third of the world's frozen french fries. So, of course, this tater town celebrated National French Fry Day over the weekend. A huge portrait of the town's covered bridge was unveiled. It was made from 5,700 fries.

Parallels
1:04 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Iran's New President Hints At Easing Internet Controls

Iranians surf the web at an Internet cafe in Tehran on April 28, 2013. The recently elected president, Hasan Rowhani, has suggested that he may loosen restrictions on the Internet.
Abedin Taherkenareh EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:10 am

Iran's President-elect Hasan Rowhani has already called for less filtering of the Internet, saying Iran must maintain its principles, but also needs to engage with the wider world.

"We should rectify our relations with the world," Rowhani said in remarks carried by Iran's Press TV. "Gone are the days when a wall could be built around the country.... Today there are no more walls."

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The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Ailing Nelson Mandela Is Reportedly Improving

A man signs a large birthday card at Loftus Stadium in Pretoria for ailing former South African President Nelson Mandela's upcoming July 18 birthday. 'Madiba' is Mandela's clan name.
Alexander Joe AFP/Getty Images

Nelson Mandela remains hospitalized, but his health is reportedly improving after spending five weeks in a Pretoria hospital with a lung infection.

Former South African President Thabo Mbeki, who succeeded Mandela, the country's first black president, says that the former anti-apartheid and Nobel laureate could be discharged soon.

Mandela has been in critical condition since June 8 when he was hospitalized with the recurring infection, which he first contracted during his 27 years as a political prison.

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Middle East
2:49 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Tug Of War In Syria Exposes Splintering Opposition

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 4:54 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Since it began more than two years ago, the bloody civil war in Syria has cost the lives of more than 100,000 people. What was once a two-sided war with rebels fighting to depose President Bashar al-Assad has fractured and fractured again into a messy multipronged struggle for power.

This fragmentation has complicated the Obama administration's promise to send so-called nonlethal aid to the rebels. So far, the aid hasn't materialized, neither has the heavy weaponry rebels say they need to win.

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The Two-Way
11:55 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Syrian Army Shelling Reportedly Traps Hundreds In Mosque

Rebel fighters take positions during clashes with pro-government forces in Aleppo earlier this month.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

At least 200 people are trapped inside a mosque in the Syrian capital, Damascus, as government forces rain artillery on rebel-held areas.

Rasha Elass, in Beirut, reports for NPR that the Syrian opposition has pleaded with the United Nations to intervene.

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The Two-Way
11:10 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Typhoon Lashes China, Adding To Flood Woes

Huge typhoon-driven waves surge up the coastline of Huangqi Peninsula in China's eastern Fujian province on Saturday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Hundreds of thousands of people in southeast China have been evacuated after a powerful typhoon barreled into the region, packing strong winds and heavy rain.

Typhoon Soulik made landfall in China's Fujian province Saturday afternoon after sweeping across Taiwan.

The typhoon comes as China is already battling torrential rainfall across large parts of the country, especially in Sichuan province. Some 200 people have been killed in floods, the worst in some areas of Sichuan in 50 years.

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World
6:04 am
Sun July 14, 2013

British TV Broadcasts Muslim Call To Prayer

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 10:12 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The holy month of Ramadan began this past week, a time when Muslims around the world engage in a disciplined routine of fasting and prayer.

(SOUNDBITE OF CALL TO PRAYER)

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World
6:04 am
Sun July 14, 2013

India To Deliver Its Last Telegram

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 10:12 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

That's the sound of telegrams being processed at the Telegraph office in Kolkata, India. The service has been running in India for 163 years, but today it will deliver India's last telegram. Here in the U.S., where the telegram was invented, Western Union abandoned its telegram service in 2006. If that seems surprisingly recent, then consider India, where cell phones are as ubiquitous as they are in the U.S., and telegrams are as irrelevant as they would be to you or me.

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Parallels
3:22 am
Sun July 14, 2013

The Don Who's Taken Charge Of Jordan's Biggest Refugee Camp

Mohammed al Hariri is known as the mafia don of the Zaatari Refugee camp. He is the man who gets things done.
Peter Breslow/NPR

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 9:14 pm

In chaotic situations, certain people rise to the top, and that is certainly the case for Mohammed al-Hariri, a former air conditioning repairman who commands enormous deference on the windblown streets of Zaatari refugee camp.

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Parallels
1:48 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Russia Keeps Up Prosecutions Of Critics, Living And Dead

Sergei Magnitsky, who died in jail in 2009, was convicted of tax evasion on July 11, 2013. Kremlin critics say this was just the strangest of several legal cases against government opponents.
Misha Japaridze AP

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 10:09 am

A Russian court's conviction of a dead man, Sergei Magnitsky, made headlines this past week because the case was so bizarre.

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Parallels
1:09 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Despite Repeated Tries, Afghan Peace Efforts Still Sputter

Afghan soldiers take positions following a clash with Taliban fighters on the outskirts of the eastern city of Jalalabad on July 7. The U.S. is trying to organize peace talks, but the latest effort has been put on hold while the fighting continues.
Noorullah Shirzada Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 2:48 pm

The U.S. has been pushing the Taliban and the Afghan government to find a political solution for the past year and a half. But every time it seems the parties are close to starting peace talks, a new demand or controversy arises and nothing happens.

In the latest attempt, the Taliban finally opened a political office in Qatar, a move that was supposed to set the stage for negotiations. But when the Taliban envoys gave that office the trappings of an embassy, a furious Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president, called off the talks, and they have yet to be re-scheduled.

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The Two-Way
4:32 pm
Sat July 13, 2013

In The Royal Baby Guessing Game, What's The Surname?

A worker of a games company poses with placards depicting a 'royal baby' near the St. Mary's Hospital Lindo Wing in London on Thursday. While Buckingham Palace has been mum on the subject, Saturday was rumored to be the official due date for the child who will become the third in line to the British throne.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Plantagenets, Tudors, Stuarts, Hanovers and now what?

There's been plenty of speculation about what name will be chosen for the first child of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (better known as Will and Kate). Bets are being placed on Charlotte, Alice, Grace, Charles, George, James, etc. (see more possibilities below).

But what about a surname for the little tyke?

According to the BBC:

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Middle East
3:16 pm
Sat July 13, 2013

Women In The Egyptian Revolution: An Evolution Of Rights

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 4:39 pm

During Egypt's 2011 revolution, activist Dalia Ziada assumed all of the male protesters around her were fighting for her rights, too. But the following years told a different story. NPR's Host Jacki Lyden talks with Ziada about the evolution of women's rights in Egypt from the 2011 uprising to the current upheaval. We also hear from Rebecca Chiao, who discovered a tool for Egyptians to report sexual harassments.

The Two-Way
10:47 am
Sat July 13, 2013

British Investigators Probe 787 Fire At Heathrow

View of the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 787 Dreamliner that caught fire on the runway near Terminal 3 at Heathrow Airport, London on Friday.
Sang Tan Associated Press

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 5:44 pm

British investigators say they will lead a probe into a fire aboard a 787 Dreamliner as it sat empty on the tarmac at London-Heathrow Airport.

The fire broke out Friday aboard an Ethiopian Airlines plane about eight hours after it had taxied to the gate.

As we reported earlier, the jet suffered what a Heathrow spokesman described as an "onboard internal fire". Photographs appeared to show fire damage just forward of the tail section.

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