World News

Parallels
11:47 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Can The Philippines Save Itself From Typhoons?

The sun sets behind a house damaged by Typhoon Haiyan outside the hard-hit city of Tacloban. The Philippines has gotten better at preparing for typhoons, but remains extremely vulnerable.
Philippe Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 12:05 pm

For the third year in a row, the Philippines has been hit by a major storm claiming more than 1,000 lives, and the death toll from Haiyan, one of the worst on record, could climb to 10,000.

With thousands of islands in the warm waters of the Pacific, the Philippines is destined to face the wrath of angry tropical storms year after year.

So what can a poor, densely populated country do to mitigate the huge loss of life and the massive destruction?

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World
9:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Reparations May Not Mean What You Think It Means

Fifteen countries in the Caribbean are seeking reparations from their former colonial masters for the lasting harm slavery has had on their countries. Host Michel Martin talks about the effort with Jermaine McCalpin from the University of West Indies in Jamaica.

World
9:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

In Dominican Republic, An Emotional Fight Over Citizenship

Thousands of people in the Dominican Republic are being stripped of their citizenship by that country. Host Michel Martin talks to Miami Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles about why Dominicans of Haitian ancestry are denouncing the decision.

The Two-Way
7:58 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Clash Between Garment Workers, Police In Cambodia Turns Deadly

An injured Cambodian worker escapes from riot police in the compound of a Buddhist pagoda in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, on Tuesday. Police fired live ammunition at protesting garment workers outside the capital, injuring at least 20 people and killing a bystander.
AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 9:17 am

Protesting garment workers and riot police clashed Tuesday in Cambodia's capital city, leaving a bystander dead and at least 20 people injured.

Workers from SL Garment Processing (Cambodia) Ltd. Factory were marching toward Prime Minister Hun Sen's residence in Phnom Penh. Workers from the factory have been protesting for months, demanding better pay and working conditions. The factory makes clothes for H&M, Gap and other Western brands.

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Parallels
6:40 am
Tue November 12, 2013

World Headlines: The Financial Cost Of Typhoon Haiyan

Philippines, Philippines Daily Inquirer

The devastation from Typhoon Haiyan could cost the Philippines economy $14 billion, according to one estimate.

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Asia
6:15 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Tacloban Took Brunt Of Typhoon Haiyen

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We have two perspectives now on the destruction a typhoon left behind in the Philippines. The first is the view from the air. It comes from U.S. Marine Brigadier General Paul Kennedy, who is coordinating an American military effort to help typhoon survivors. Not long ago, General Kennedy stepped on board a helicopter for what he called reconnaissance. He flew over a wide strip of land struck by one of the strongest storms on record.

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The Two-Way
5:55 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Typhoon Haiyan: How To Help

Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the central Philippines coastal village of Capiz got some help Monday when a Filipino military helicopter brought some much-needed food.
Tara Yap AFP/Getty Images

The State Department announced Monday that it is "cooperating with the Philippines Typhoon Disaster Relief Fund established by The mGive Foundation, a U.S. nonprofit organization" to collect donations for victims of the typhoon that struck the Philippines on Friday.

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The Two-Way
5:10 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Typhoon's Death Toll Likely Near 2,500, President Aquino Says

On Tuesday, a boy sat in the debris of destroyed houses in Tacloban, on the eastern Filipino island of Leyte.
Noel Celis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 10:35 am

  • From the airport in Tacloban: NPR's Anthony Kuhn says Tuesday that "people are very hungry" and some are quite angry.
  • On 'Morning Edition': Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy talks about Typhoon Haiyan and the destruction in the Philippines

Update at 12:30 p.m. ET:

Grim estimates that the death toll in the Philippines from Typhoon Haiyan might be around 10,000 appear to have been "too much," President Benigno Aquino III told CNN Tuesday.

Aquino said that as more information has come in about the devastation, the figure is looking more likely to be between 2,000 to 2,500.

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Asia
3:16 am
Tue November 12, 2013

U.S. Military Mobilizes To Help Typhoon-Stricken Philippines

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:15 am

Linda Wertheimer talks to Marine Brigadier General Paul Kennedy who is managing a large aid effort from Manila. He is touring the devastated areas by air. After one assessment, he told the AP: "We saw bodies everywhere," and "I don't know how else to describe total devastation."

Asia
3:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Typhoon Devastates Leyte Province

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:15 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Let's get some perspective now on the destruction in the Philippines.

WERTHEIMER: Almost any death toll we might give today would be unreliable. But we do know that hundreds of thousands of people who survived the storm are now living without shelter. They now face the challenge of finding basics like food and water.

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Middle East
3:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Israel Joins Debate Over Nuclear Talks With Iran

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 6:22 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Parallels
1:07 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Tripoli Zoo Sees Different Kind Of Cage — One With Migrants

Illegal immigrants captured in the Libyan coastal city of Surman are held at a temporary prison in an eastern district of Tripoli, Libya, on Oct. 19.
Hamza Turkia Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 11:34 am

Gun-toting militiamen man the steel gate that leads into the Tripoli zoo. A sign promises a garden of animals. Inside, there are paths that meander through a maze of cages and animal habitats. Monkeys climb trees; hippos submerge themselves in water and lions lounge in the heat.

Just a few hundred yards away, there's a different kind of cage: Inside there are people — migrants waiting to be deported or to prove they are in Libya legally.

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Parallels
1:03 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Photos Reveal Harsh Detail Of Brazil's History With Slavery

A lady with two slaves, in Bahia, Brazil, 1860.
Moreira Salles Institute Archive

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 8:25 am

Brazil was the last place in the Americas to abolish slavery — it didn't happen until 1888 — and that meant that the final years of the practice were photographed.

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Shots - Health News
1:01 am
Tue November 12, 2013

WHO Rates Typhoon's Medical Challenges "Monumental"

A woman comforts a pregnant relative suffering labor pains at a makeshift birthing clinic in typhoon-battered city of Tacloban, Philippines on Nov. 11.
Erik de Castro Reuters /Landov

Images of the swath of devastation wrought by Typhoon Haiyan in the central Philippines are reminiscent of the tsunami's aftermath in Banda Aceh, Indonesia nearly a decade ago.

And indeed, the World Health Organization grades the great typhoon of 2013 as a Category 3 disaster – its most severe category.

"The scale [of the typhoon's damage] is huge," Dr. Richard Brennan of the World Health Organization tells Shots. "It's monumental. This is one of the biggest emergencies we've dealt with in some time."

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Storm Surge And Low-Lying Philippines Made A Deadly Combination

Residents wade through flood waters on Sunday in Tacloban City, Leyte, Philippines, in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.
Jeoffrey Maitem Getty Images

The worst part of Typhoon Haiyan, which is thought to have killed as many as 10,000 people in the Philippines, was storm surge, NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on All Things Considered.

Joyce spoke with storm surge expert Carl Drews, of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado. Dawes says the surge was greatest at Tacloban City, where the Leyte Gulf narrows into the San Pedro and San Pablo Bay.

"That is about the worst path and the worst place for surge," Drews says.

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Shots - Health News
4:00 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Aid Groups Struggle To Reach Survivors Of Typhoon Haiyan

Military personnel from the U.S. and the Philippines unload relief goods at the Tacloban airport, Nov. 11, 2013. Some reports estimate that 10,000 people may have died in the city of Tacloban.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:08 am

Aid agencies are scrambling to try to get water and food to people in the Philippines who've been left homeless or injured by Typhoon Haiyan.

But reaching some of the areas ravaged by the intense storm is proving difficult. Even when aid can make it onto the islands, it's still not clear what supplies are needed the most.

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Science
3:52 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage

This map from the NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory shows the amount of heat energy available to Typhoon Haiyan between Oct. 28 and Nov. 3. Darker purple indicates more available energy. Typhoons gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. The path of the storm is marked with the black line in the center of the image.
NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:13 pm

The deadly typhoon that swept through the Philippines was one of the strongest ever recorded. But storms nearly this powerful are actually common in the eastern Pacific. Typhoon Haiyan's devastation can be chalked up to a series of bad coincidences.

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Parallels
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Will The French Really Pay More for 'Made in France'?

French Minister for Industrial Renewal Arnaud Montebourg attends the Made in France fair in Paris on Saturday. According to a poll, more than 70 percent of the French say they would pay more for goods made at home.
Alain Jocard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

The French economy suffers from many ailments: weak growth, high unemployment, poor competitiveness and a general sense of economic gloom. And every proposed government remedy seems to be met by protests from one corner or another.

Yet no one seems to be arguing with a little injection of economic patriotism.

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Africa
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

DRC Rebels' Surrender Could Mark New Chapter In U.N. Peacekeeping

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

There's been a rare bit of good news in Eastern Congo this month. One of the rebel groups that have terrorized civilians in the mineral rich part of the the Democratic Republic of Congo agreed to end its rebellion. There's still a lot of work to do to disarm the M23 and to keep other rebel movements in check. But this small victory is a boost for U.N. peacekeepers, who are under a new, tougher mandate to protect civilians in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Some experts wonder if this could be a new model for peacekeeping.

Middle East
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

What Was On The Table And What Got Rejected At Iran Nuclear Talks?

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 6:21 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

The differences between Iran and the six world powers it's negotiating with over its nuclear program remain big enough to have prevented an agreement from being signed in Geneva over the weekend. And the differences between the so-called Five Plus One Group and Israel are also significant. The Five Plus One are the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, that includes the U.S. plus Germany.

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Africa
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Think L.A. Is Bad? Take A Drive Through Traffic-Clogged Lagos

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

For another kind of gridlock, we turn now to Nigeria. The city of Lagos is on the fast track to being the most populous in Africa, but the city is often stuck in traffic. Buses, taxis and overloaded trucks are held hostage to a road network that hasn't been updated in decades. The locals call them go-slows. Reporter Rowan Moore Gerety rode along with a Lagos cab driver to see for himself.

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Asia
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

In Typhoon-Heavy Western Pacific, Preparation Can Only Go So Far

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As we mentioned earlier, the Philippines is no stranger to big storms. When it comes to typhoons, it's much like Tornado Alley in the American Midwest. Over the past 60 years, the region has seen an average of almost 20 typhoons a year.

As NPR's Christopher Joyce reports, the country is nonetheless hard-pressed to prepare for something as big as this.

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Asia
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Aid Groups Struggle To Meet Needs After Typhoon In Philippines

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From Manila in the north, now to Cebu in the hard-hit central Philippines. We're going to hear about the aid situation there. Earlier we reached Aaron Aspi. He's with World Vision, a Christian humanitarian organization, and Aspi described mass devastation, especially in the northernmost part of the island.

AARON ASPI: Ninety percent of the structures have been damaged and whole communities are obliterated by storm surges with giant waves as high as seven meters.

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Asia
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Devastation, Looting In The Philippines After Deadly Typhoon

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

I'm Audie Cornish. And we begin this hour in the Philippines, where thousands of people are feared dead in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. In the city of Tacloban, utter devastation; cars tossed, the bodies of the dead yet to be buried and survivors clamoring for food and water.

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The Two-Way
1:22 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Police: Indie Musicians Killed By Former Bandmate In NYC

Police say three musicians, two from an Iranian-American indie rock group, were shot and killed early Monday and a fourth person was wounded in the East Williamsburg area of Brooklyn, New York. The alleged assailant, who took his own life, was also a musician, they said.

According to The Associated Press:

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Books
8:49 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Africana Book Awards: There's More To Africa Than Animals

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 10:16 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now to an award dedicated to giving young American readers an accurate and balanced account of Africa. Parents and teachers looking for books that go beyond the portrayal of lions and giraffes or safaris might want to check out the winners of this year's Children's Africana Book Awards. The prize, which was awarded on Saturday night, was set up to showcase the best children's books about Africa that are published in the U.S.

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Parallels
8:38 am
Mon November 11, 2013

World Headlines: Iran, U.N. Nuclear Watchdog Set Road Map

Ali Akbar Salehi, Iran's nuclear chief, shakes hands with Yukiya Amano, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, in Tehran, Iran, on Monday.
Ahmad Halabisaz Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 11:27 am

Iran, Press TV

Iran says it has worked out a plan with the U.N. nuclear watchdog on greater cooperation, including visits to the Arak nuclear facility.

Al Akbar Salehi, Iran's nuclear chief, and Yukiya Amano, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, announced the plan at a news conference in Tehran on Monday.

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Asia
2:42 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Western Media In China: Adjusting To The 'Anaconda'

An exterior view of the Bloomberg building in New York. Bloomberg staffers say editors spiked a story that exposed financial ties between a tycoon and family members of top Chinese officials.
Eduardo Munoz Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 1:15 pm

Last weekend was a bad one for foreign reporting in China.

Staffers at Bloomberg News accused their own editors of spiking an investigative story to avoid the wrath of the Communist Party, and the wire service Reuters confirmed Chinese officials had denied a visa application for a hard-hitting reporter after an eight-month wait.

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Asia
2:37 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Philippine Typhoon Leaves Hard-Hit Areas Suffering

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 am

Supplies are desperately low after a massive typhoon hit the Philippines. Linda Wertheimer talks to Lynette Lim of Save the Children in Manila about the catastrophic typhoon.

Middle East
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Iran Nuclear Talks Break, To Resume Later This Month

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 am

Negotiators from Iran and a six-nation group are scheduled to resume talks on Iran's nuclear program in 10 days. Talks ended on Saturday after an agreement was not reached on an initial proposal to ease international sanctions against Tehran in return for some restraints on its nuclear program.

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