World News

Parallels
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Will The French Really Pay More for 'Made in France'?

French Minister for Industrial Renewal Arnaud Montebourg attends the Made in France fair in Paris on Saturday. According to a poll, more than 70 percent of the French say they would pay more for goods made at home.
Alain Jocard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

The French economy suffers from many ailments: weak growth, high unemployment, poor competitiveness and a general sense of economic gloom. And every proposed government remedy seems to be met by protests from one corner or another.

Yet no one seems to be arguing with a little injection of economic patriotism.

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Africa
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

DRC Rebels' Surrender Could Mark New Chapter In U.N. Peacekeeping

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

There's been a rare bit of good news in Eastern Congo this month. One of the rebel groups that have terrorized civilians in the mineral rich part of the the Democratic Republic of Congo agreed to end its rebellion. There's still a lot of work to do to disarm the M23 and to keep other rebel movements in check. But this small victory is a boost for U.N. peacekeepers, who are under a new, tougher mandate to protect civilians in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Some experts wonder if this could be a new model for peacekeeping.

Middle East
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

What Was On The Table And What Got Rejected At Iran Nuclear Talks?

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 6:21 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

The differences between Iran and the six world powers it's negotiating with over its nuclear program remain big enough to have prevented an agreement from being signed in Geneva over the weekend. And the differences between the so-called Five Plus One Group and Israel are also significant. The Five Plus One are the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, that includes the U.S. plus Germany.

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Africa
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Think L.A. Is Bad? Take A Drive Through Traffic-Clogged Lagos

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

For another kind of gridlock, we turn now to Nigeria. The city of Lagos is on the fast track to being the most populous in Africa, but the city is often stuck in traffic. Buses, taxis and overloaded trucks are held hostage to a road network that hasn't been updated in decades. The locals call them go-slows. Reporter Rowan Moore Gerety rode along with a Lagos cab driver to see for himself.

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Asia
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

In Typhoon-Heavy Western Pacific, Preparation Can Only Go So Far

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As we mentioned earlier, the Philippines is no stranger to big storms. When it comes to typhoons, it's much like Tornado Alley in the American Midwest. Over the past 60 years, the region has seen an average of almost 20 typhoons a year.

As NPR's Christopher Joyce reports, the country is nonetheless hard-pressed to prepare for something as big as this.

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Asia
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Aid Groups Struggle To Meet Needs After Typhoon In Philippines

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From Manila in the north, now to Cebu in the hard-hit central Philippines. We're going to hear about the aid situation there. Earlier we reached Aaron Aspi. He's with World Vision, a Christian humanitarian organization, and Aspi described mass devastation, especially in the northernmost part of the island.

AARON ASPI: Ninety percent of the structures have been damaged and whole communities are obliterated by storm surges with giant waves as high as seven meters.

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Asia
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Devastation, Looting In The Philippines After Deadly Typhoon

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

I'm Audie Cornish. And we begin this hour in the Philippines, where thousands of people are feared dead in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. In the city of Tacloban, utter devastation; cars tossed, the bodies of the dead yet to be buried and survivors clamoring for food and water.

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The Two-Way
1:22 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Police: Indie Musicians Killed By Former Bandmate In NYC

Police say three musicians, two from an Iranian-American indie rock group, were shot and killed early Monday and a fourth person was wounded in the East Williamsburg area of Brooklyn, New York. The alleged assailant, who took his own life, was also a musician, they said.

According to The Associated Press:

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Books
8:49 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Africana Book Awards: There's More To Africa Than Animals

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 10:16 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now to an award dedicated to giving young American readers an accurate and balanced account of Africa. Parents and teachers looking for books that go beyond the portrayal of lions and giraffes or safaris might want to check out the winners of this year's Children's Africana Book Awards. The prize, which was awarded on Saturday night, was set up to showcase the best children's books about Africa that are published in the U.S.

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Parallels
8:38 am
Mon November 11, 2013

World Headlines: Iran, U.N. Nuclear Watchdog Set Road Map

Ali Akbar Salehi, Iran's nuclear chief, shakes hands with Yukiya Amano, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, in Tehran, Iran, on Monday.
Ahmad Halabisaz Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 11:27 am

Iran, Press TV

Iran says it has worked out a plan with the U.N. nuclear watchdog on greater cooperation, including visits to the Arak nuclear facility.

Al Akbar Salehi, Iran's nuclear chief, and Yukiya Amano, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, announced the plan at a news conference in Tehran on Monday.

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Asia
2:42 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Western Media In China: Adjusting To The 'Anaconda'

An exterior view of the Bloomberg building in New York. Bloomberg staffers say editors spiked a story that exposed financial ties between a tycoon and family members of top Chinese officials.
Eduardo Munoz Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 1:15 pm

Last weekend was a bad one for foreign reporting in China.

Staffers at Bloomberg News accused their own editors of spiking an investigative story to avoid the wrath of the Communist Party, and the wire service Reuters confirmed Chinese officials had denied a visa application for a hard-hitting reporter after an eight-month wait.

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Asia
2:37 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Philippine Typhoon Leaves Hard-Hit Areas Suffering

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 am

Supplies are desperately low after a massive typhoon hit the Philippines. Linda Wertheimer talks to Lynette Lim of Save the Children in Manila about the catastrophic typhoon.

Middle East
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Iran Nuclear Talks Break, To Resume Later This Month

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 am

Negotiators from Iran and a six-nation group are scheduled to resume talks on Iran's nuclear program in 10 days. Talks ended on Saturday after an agreement was not reached on an initial proposal to ease international sanctions against Tehran in return for some restraints on its nuclear program.

Business
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Greek Shop Owners Resist Opening On Sundays

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 am

The Greek government is pushing stores to open on Sundays, just like the tourist shops around the Acropolis. But mom-and-pop shops that are participating in a pilot program to open seven Sundays a year, say they lost money last weekend — the first Sunday the program was effect.

World
4:11 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

Lighting Up The Investigative Path With Polonium-210

Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat boards a helicopter in Ramallah, the West Bank, for the start of his journey to a hospital in France on Oct. 29, 2004. He died 2 weeks later.
Scott Nelson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 4:58 pm

With a Swiss forensics investigation pointing to polonium-210 as a possible cause of Yasser Arafat's death, the radioactive element is back in the news.

Confirming whether the Palestinian leader died from an assassination attempt will be difficult, given polonium's short half-life and the fact that Arafat has been dead nine years, science writer Deborah Blum says.

Whatever happened to Arafat, polonium does have a deadly history.

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Asia
10:54 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Dispatch From One Of The Philippines' Hardest-Hit Areas In

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Typhoon Haiyan swept to the Philippines with nearly 200 mile per hour winds. Thousands are now feared dead. Save the Children's Lynette Lim was in one of the hardest-hit areas, Tacloban City, this morning. She joins us now from the capital, Manila. Thanks so much for being with us.

LYNETTE LIM: Not problem.

MARTIN: So describe what you saw. How were conditions in Tacloban City when you left this morning?

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The Sunday Conversation
3:15 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Nazi Hunter Dedicates Career To Pursuing Justice

Eli Rosenbaum's team has investigated and prosecuted more than 1700 Nazi cases.
Department of Justice

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:54 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

More than 65 years after World War II, many Nazis are living out their lives in quiet retirements. The crimes scenes are, for the most part, cold. But Eli Rosenbaum is hot on the trail. He and his team at the Justice Department are Nazi hunters. They track down Nazis who moved to the U.S. after the war, and deport them.

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The Two-Way
11:50 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Thousands Feared Dead After Typhoon Haiyan

Residents rest outside a stadium used as an evacuation center in Tacloban, Leyte province, central Philippines on Sunday after devastating Typhoon Haiyan hit the city on Friday.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:16 am

The vicious typhoon that raged through the center of the Philippines appears to have killed hundreds, if not thousands of people, and officials were reportedly struggling Sunday to distribute aid to survivors left homeless and destitute.

Deaths in the province of Leyte — mainly from drowning and collapsed buildings — could escalate to 10,000, the regional police chief told the AP. The administrator of the province capital, Tacloban, said the toll could climb that high in the city alone.

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History
3:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

75 Years Ago, Kristallnacht Presaged The Holocaust

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:27 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

If you're just joining us, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

It was once impossible to imagine Germany without Jews. You only have to look at the Yiddish language to have a sense of how richly the Jewish experience was integrated in the cultural life of Germany. That ended in the most vicious and heinous manner 75 years ago today.

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World
3:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

In Egypt, Ousted President's Appearance Brings Fresh Clashes

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:17 am

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

The first democratically elected president of Egypt, Mohammed Morsi, appeared in court on Monday. It was the first time he had been seen in public since the military coup that ousted him in early July. Morsi is being tried on charges of inciting murder and violence. He's become a rallying symbol for his supporters who have been protesting his ouster for more than four months. One person was killed and three others injured in the violence yesterday.

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National Security
3:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Edward Snowden's NSA Revelations Keep Coming

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 3:23 pm

Since June, documents leaked by National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden have produced revelation upon revelation about the nation's top-secret intelligence gathering operations. The latest information, about U.S. spying on foreign leaders, has angered even some dependable U.S. allies. New York Times national security reporter Scott Shane, and Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., a senior member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, discuss the latest Snowden-related leaks.

Europe
3:18 am
Sat November 9, 2013

Bearing Witness To Nazis' Life-Shattering Kristallnacht

View of a destroyed Jewish shop in Berlin on Nov. 11, 1938, after the anti-Semitic violence of Kristallnacht. The pogrom unleashed Nazi-coordinated attacks on thousands of synagogues and Jewish businesses.
Keystone-France Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:26 pm

On a busy street in Berlin's shabby-chic district of Kreuzberg, the gray and dirty pavement glistens with little brass cobblestones. Millions of these stones are embedded in sidewalks all over Europe. They commemorate the last address the city's Jewish residents called home before the war.

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Parallels
3:28 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

France Rethinks The Sanctity Of Its Day Of Rest

A woman walks amid both open and closed shops during a Sunday morning stroll at the Butte Montmartre in Paris, in July. Under France's Byzantine rules on Sunday trading, shops at the top of the hill are in a designated tourist area and so can open, but those at the bottom cannot.
Christian Hartmann Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 6:34 pm

There's a fight going on for the soul of France. Since 1906, Sunday has been deemed a collective day of rest in the country, and French law only allows stores to open on Sundays under very specific conditions — for example, if they're in a high tourist area. Sunday work is also tightly controlled.

But some people are questioning the sense of such a tradition in a languishing economy and 24/7 world.

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Middle East
3:18 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Iran Nuclear Deal Seems Close, But What Might It Look Like?

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:24 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And to talk further about chances for that nuclear diplomacy, we're joined by veteran diplomat Dennis Ross. Most recently, he was the Obama administration's chief adviser on Iran at the State Department and the National Security Council. Ambassador Ross, welcome back to the program.

DENNIS ROSS: Nice to be with you. Thank you.

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Middle East
3:18 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Iran Nuclear Talks Bring Top Diplomats, But Still No Deal

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:23 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block in Washington, D.C.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

I'm Audie Cornish, this week at NPR West in California.

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Europe
3:18 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Russian LGBT Activists Visit Washington To Drum Up Support

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 6:08 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish at NPR West in California.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block in Washington, D.C. Russian gay rights activists are making the rounds here in the nation's capital. They want the U.S. to keep up pressure on Moscow ahead of the Winter Olympics in Sochi. They're not calling for a boycott. As NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, they want to raise awareness about anti-gay discrimination in Russia.

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The Two-Way
1:37 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Which Is It? Hurricane, Typhoon Or Tropical Cyclone?

Typhoon Bhopa scene over the Philippine island of Palawan last December.
NASA Goddard's MODIS Rapid Response Team

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 3:21 pm

What's the difference between a hurricane, a typhoon and a cyclone? Nothing more than location.

As Super Typhoon Haiyan slams into the Philippines, we here at the Two-Way found ourselves revisiting old ground about the nature of tropical storms. In case you need a refresher (as we did), here is the lowdown:

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The Two-Way
11:06 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Toronto Mayor Advised To 'Go Away For A Couple Of Weeks'

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford on Thursday.
Mark Blinch Reuters/Landov

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, who this week has admitted to smoking crack and to being "extremely inebriated" when he was videotaped dropping F-bombs and threatening to kill someone, needs to go away for "a couple of weeks," his brother said Friday.

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It's All Politics
10:59 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Presidential Apologies: Regrets, They Have A Few

President Obama walks from the White House to Marine One on Friday. In an interview Thursday with NBC News, he apologized for breaking a promise regarding the Affordable Care Act.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 12:31 pm

Now that President Obama has apologized to those who've seen their health care plans canceled due to the Affordable Care Act, losses he pledged beforehand wouldn't happen, he joins the line of modern presidents who have had to look the American people in the eye and give their regrets.

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Shots - Health News
10:34 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Polio In The Middle East And Africa Could Threaten Europe

A doctor vaccinates a child against polio at a health clinic in Damascus, Syria, on Nov. 6. To stop the disease from spreading beyond Syria, health officials plan to vaccinate 20 million children in the region.
Youssef Badawi EPA /LANDOV

Polio outbreaks in the Middle East and Africa could spread to Europe if precautions aren't taken, researchers say.

The recent discovery of the poliovirus in Syria, Somalia and Israel should be a wake-up call for European health officials, according to epidemiologist Martin Eichner at the University of Tuebingen in Germany.

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