World News

Africa
2:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Republican Senators Urge Egypt To Start A National Dialogue

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Republican Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham are in Egypt today. They're trying to resolve a growing political crisis sparked by the military's ouster of President Mohammed Morsi. The senators urged all sides to start a national dialogue.

But as NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Cairo, their choice of words quickly angered the interim government.

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The Two-Way
10:12 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Japan Shows Off Largest Warship In 60 Years

Japan's new warship, the Izumo, draws a crowd for its launch ceremony at the port in Yokohama Tuesday. At 248 meters (814 feet) in length, the flat-topped ship has been called a destroyer, or a helicopter carrier.
Toshifumi Kitamura AFP/Getty Images

It's being called a destroyer, or perhaps a helicopter carrier. But by any name, Japan's new warship, unveiled Tuesday, is the largest it has built since World War II. The ship was shown to the public on the anniversary of the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and at a time of escalating tensions with China.

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Africa
10:07 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Do Zimbabweans See Election As A Sham?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
9:09 am
Tue August 6, 2013

FATBERG! 15-Ton 'Lump Of Lard' Removed From London Sewer

That's a lot of fat: A photo showing some of the 15-ton "fatberg" that was clogging up a London sewer system.
Thames Water AP

Set this post aside until after lunch if you have a sensitive stomach.

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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Tue August 6, 2013

India Accuses Pakistan Of Killing 5 Soldiers

Supporters of India's main opposition Bharatiya Janata Party protest Tuesday in Allahabad, India, against the deaths of five Indian soldiers. India has accused Pakistani soldiers of firing across the Line of Control in Kashmir; Islamabad denies the charge.
Rajesh Kumar Singh AP

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 10:35 am

India has accused Pakistani troops of killing five Indian soldiers after firing across the Line of Control, the de facto border in disputed Kashmir. Pakistan denies any firing from its side, and calls the allegation "baseless."

This latest incident comes amid attempts to renew diplomatic overtures for peace between the two nuclear-armed rivals.

Indian officials say Pakistani soldiers fired into Indian territory overnight, ambushing a patrol of Indian troops.

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The Two-Way
4:59 am
Tue August 6, 2013

'Depart Immediately,' State Dept. Tells Americans In Yemen

An army trooper sits beside a machine gun that is mounted on a patrol vehicle at a checkpoint in Sanaa, Yemen. Security is tight in the capital amid warnings about possible terrorist attacks.
Khaled Abdullah Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 10:25 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Dina Temple-Raston talks with Linda Wertheimer about the terrorism alerts

Warning that "the security threat level in Yemen is extremely high," the State Department is urging any Americans in that country to "depart immediately."

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Art & Design
3:23 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Art In Context: Venice Biennale Looks Past Pop Culture

The Angolan exhibit consists of tall stacks of large photographic posters by artist Edson Chagas. The country, which is exhibiting at Venice for the first time, won the Golden Lion award for best national pavilion.
Courtesy of www.beyondentrophy.com

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 9:56 am

Every two years for over a century, lovers of contemporary art convene in Venice for the oldest and largest noncommercial art exhibition in the world.

The Venice Biennale has none of the glitz and conspicuous consumption of art auctions in London and New York. Instead, it's a dizzying and eclectic array of sights by both celebrity artists and total unknowns.

This year's works are not just paintings, sculptures and installations, but also performances, videos and music.

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Business
2:46 am
Tue August 6, 2013

GM Looks To China To Boost Car Sales

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 4:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

General Motors is selling a lot of cars in China. The company set a sales record there in July.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports China is in the front line in the battle for automotive global dominance.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: In China this year, forecasters predict nearly 20 million cars will be sold. In the U.S., the bet is we'll sell about 15 and a half million.

Mike Wall is with IHS Automotive.

MILE WALL: Yeah, you really can't overstate the importance of China in the overall global automotive landscape.

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Space
3:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Space Robot Designed As Companion For Japanese Astronaut

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:24 pm

Japan has launched a humanoid robot bound for the International Space Station to keep one of its astronauts company.

World
3:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Interpol Asks For Help Tracking Escaped Al-Qaida Inmates

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Just after the State Department announced it would close those diplomatic missions came another alert, this one from Interpol, the global police organization. Interpol is asking for help tracking hundreds of terrorism suspects who've escaped from prisons in Iraq, Pakistan and Libya over the past month. NPR's counterterrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston has been following the story and she joins me now.

And Dina, what's the connection between these two security alerts, one from Interpol and the other from the State Department?

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World
3:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Ambassadors Question Decision To Close Mideast Embassies

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Nineteen U.S. embassies and consulates in the Middle East and Africa will stay closed for the rest of the week. The State Department says that it's operating out of an abundance of caution amid intelligence reports about the possibility of terrorist attacks. And, as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, it's not clear when the facilities will reopen.

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All Tech Considered
1:17 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

The Hackable Japanese Toilet Comes With An App To Track Poop

A promotion for the My Satis app.
My Satis

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 1:45 pm

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The Two-Way
12:55 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Ex-Turkish Military Chief Gets Life In Prison For Coup Plot

Protesters wave posters of Turkey's first president, Kemal Ataturk, before a police barricade outside the Silivri jail complex in Silivri, Turkey, on Monday. Scores of people were sentenced for their roles in what's being dubbed the Ergenekon plot.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:15 pm

Turkey's former military chief was sentenced to life in prison and scores of others were given long sentences Monday for plotting against the government of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

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Parallels
10:49 am
Mon August 5, 2013

World War II Researchers Say 'Italian Schindler' Was A Myth

The Risiera di San Sabba in Trieste was used during World War II as the only death camp on Italian soil. In the building's courtyard, the outline on the brick wall is where the crematorium was located.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:24 pm

A group of Italian researchers who have studied troves of World War II documents have found no evidence that Giovanni Palatucci, a police official long credited as the "Italian Schindler," saved the lives of 5,000 Jews.

The findings are demolishing the Italian national icon and angering supporters of the man who has been honored at Israel's Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial, and who has been put on the track to sainthood.

'Unfounded' Claims Of Heroism?

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Parallels
10:28 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Why India's Next State Is Not Likely To Be The Last

Visitors ride in a carriage at the entrance of the Jewel of the Nizams "Falaknuma Palace," the former residence of Nizam Mehaboob Ali Khan in the old city area of Hyderabad. The legacy of these Muslim rulers — and the disenfranchisement of the Hindu majority — contributed to the economic gap in Andhra Pradesh.
Noah Seelam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:35 am

India's cartographers may soon be redrawing the country's map. If events go to plan, India will inaugurate Telangana, its 29th state, perhaps as early as next year — casting the spotlight anew on the challenges of governing a country as vast, and with a population as diverse, as India.

Telangana, on the arid Deccan plateau, is due to be carved out of the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, India's fifth most populous state, with a population of 85 million.

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Parallels
10:22 am
Mon August 5, 2013

A West Bank Spring At The Center Of Deadly Struggle

Palestinian Bashir Tamimi, 57, drinks water from a spring on land that he says belongs to his family. Teenagers from a nearby Israeli settlement built collection pools and brought in picnic tables when they saw no one using the spring. It has now become a source of conflict.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 8:00 am

There's a pretty little spring in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, where fresh water has dripped from the rock, probably for centuries.

Now it is the center of a deadly struggle over land.

Israeli teenagers from Halamish, the Jewish settlement a short walk uphill, found the spring several years ago. It flows from a small cave.

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Politics
10:02 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Lack of Leadership Causing US Defense Issues Abroad?

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:44 am

A terror threat closes American embassies, and changes the political debate about intelligence gathering. Host Michel Martin talks politics with Republican strategist Ron Christie, and former Obama administration advisor Corey Ealons.

The Two-Way
8:26 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Bike Commuter Miffed By Notice Of 15-Minute-Only Parking

"So I got a ticket," bike commuter Molly Millar wrote in a tweet last week. The Vancouver cyclist had left her bike in a rack outside her office building.
Molly Millar Twitter

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 9:24 am

A cyclist who commutes to work in Vancouver, Canada, was surprised and angered last week when she found a note from her office building on her bike that threatened its confiscation. Her offense? Parking in the "15-minute-only" bike rack.

"So I got a ticket from #CadillacFairview for parking my bike outside their building/my office," tweeted Molly Millar, who works in the Vancouver Sun & Province Building, also known as Granville Square.

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Africa
4:23 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Why Gay Pride Celebrations In Uganda Were Discreet

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:44 am

Gay pride celebrations are held loudly each summer in New York, Paris and Berlin. But when Uganda held its version of the event this weekend, it was done very privately. It came as the Ugandan parliament considers a piece of extremely anti-gay legislation, and as discrimination against gays is widespread

Middle East
3:15 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Outlook For U.S.-Iran Relations Brightens With Rouhani

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:58 am

Iran inaugurated its new president over the weekend. President Hasan Rouhani is a moderate who has called for dialogue with the United States. Both countries have expressed an interest in talking again. Linda Wertheimer talks to Vali Nasr, dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, about U.S.-Iran relations.

Africa
3:06 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Secretary Kerry Adds His Voice To Disputed Zimbabwe Vote

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 4:38 pm

Secretary of State John Kerry is weighing in on the Zimbabwe elections, saying the results do not reflect the will of the people. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton from the capital Harare on Kerry's statement, which details several reported problems at the polls. Longtime President Robert Mugabe was named with victor on Saturday.

The Two-Way
12:26 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Australian PM Calls September Elections

Australia's Prime Minister Kevin Rudd addresses the media in Canberra after calling Sunday for a general election in September.
AFP/Getty Images

Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd has called elections for Sept. 7, setting the stage for a parliamentary contest that he says will determine the future of the country's economy.

Rudd's challenge comes just six weeks after he wrested control of the Labor Party from Prime Minister Julia Gillard. He faces stiff competition from conservative opponent Tony Abbott.

But as The Associated Press reports:

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National Security
9:33 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Snowden Case Illustrates Decline In U.S.-Russia Relations

President Obama met with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Northern Ireland in June.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 4:38 pm

U.S.-Russia relations hit a new low this week, when Moscow ignored U.S. requests and gave temporary asylum to a man who leaked classified documents on U.S. government surveillance programs.

Many in Congress are complaining that the Edward Snowden case is just the latest example of how the Kremlin is thumbing its nose at the White House.

The Obama administration famously reset relations with Russia when Dmitry Medvedev was president. But now that Russian President Vladimir Putin is back in the Kremlin, it seems to be having a more difficult time.

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The Two-Way
7:14 am
Sun August 4, 2013

State Department Extends Closure Of Embassies

An American flag flies over the U.S. Consulate in Jerusalem on Sunday.
Lior Mizrahi Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 2:46 pm

Update At 4:40 p.m. ET:

State Department spokesperson Jen Psaki says Sunday that the embassy and consulate closures will be extended:

In a statement, Psaki says the decision was taken "out of an abundance of caution" and the it was "not an indication of a new threat stream, merely an indication of our commitment to exercise caution ... to protect our employees."

The statement says:

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The Two-Way
6:21 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Iran's New President: U.S. Wants 'Excuse' To Confront Tehran

Iran's new President Hassan Rowhani sits next to the national flag on his first official day in office in Tehran on Saturday.
Atta Kenare AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:42 am

Hassan Rouhani, Iran's newly elected president, is being sworn-in on Sunday, succeeding the controversial Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, whose focus on the country's nuclear program proved a constant source of tension with the West.

Rouhani, 64, is viewed as a moderate and has pledged greater openness on the country's nuclear program. However, the former chief nuclear negotiator for Tehran appeared late Saturday to be reading from the same script as his predecessor:

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Africa
5:03 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Activists Fight Uganda's Anti-Gay Bill

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:39 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In Uganda, local activists have been fighting a bill that might be one of the most punitive and anti-gay measures in the world. It's actually called the Anti-Homosexuality Bill, and that's just one vote away from becoming law.

NPR's Gregory Warner is in Kampala. Welcome to the program, Greg.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Thanks, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, it's Gay Pride Week in many countries around the world. How is it being marked in Uganda, especially in light of this pending legislation?

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Middle East
5:03 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Musharraf's Return Fuels Chaos In Pakistan

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:39 am

The former president will be charged with the murder of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, who was killed at a rally in 2007. Host Rachel Martin talks to Hameed Gul, former director general of the ISI, Pakistan's intelligence service, about the political deterioration in Pakistan.

Asia
5:03 am
Sun August 4, 2013

When Comedians Cross Borders

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:39 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Comedy is something we tend to think of as universal. If a joke's funny, it's just funny, right? Not really. Turns out humor can be really culturally specific. And today, we're going to look at what happens when comedians try to cross over from one cultural to another. Our next guest has some experience with that. His name is Ryan Ha. He's a Chinese-American who lives in Beijing. And he is the CEO of something called Comedy Club China. He's joined us in our studios this morning. Hey, Ryan. Thanks for coming in.

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National Security
5:03 am
Sun August 4, 2013

U.S. Embassies In The Muslim World Closed Sunday

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:39 am

The Department of State has issued a travel alert over the continued potential for terrorist attacks, particularly in the Middle East and North Africa. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston speaks with Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin about the threat of more attacks.

Afghanistan
1:58 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Regimental Combat Team 7 Rolls Up Its Flag In Afghanistan

Regimental Combat Team 7 cases its flag during their mission's closing ceremony in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 12:42 pm

At the peak of fighting in Afghanistan's Helmand Province, there were 20,000 Marines battling the Taliban. Now there are 8,000 — and more are heading home every month.

Among the latest to pack up was Regimental Combat Team 7.

At their mission's recent closing ceremony, several hundred Marines gathered in the scorching desert heat at Camp Leatherneck in Helmand Province. Their tan, pixelated fatigues blended in amidst the vast expanse of sand-colored tents and buildings of the largest Marine base in Afghanistan.

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