World News

Asia
4:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Japan Seeks 'Escape From Postwar Regime'

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

On Aug. 15, 1945, Emperor Hirohito announced Japan's surrender to Allied forces, putting an end to World War II. With the peace deal, Japan was forced to demilitarize.

Now, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is suggesting it may be time for Japan to shake off its postwar identity. This past week, Abe sent senior officials to a shrine glorifying Japan's soldiers, including some who were prosecuted for war crimes. The government of China protested. South Korea, which also suffered under Japan during the war, is concerned as well.

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Asia
4:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Executions In China Declining

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

China executes more people each year than the rest of the world put together. That's according to human rights groups. China's government doesn't release execution figures, but it appears that executions in China are declining. Last year, an estimated 3,000 people were put to death. That's down from an average of 15,000 per year in the 1990s. In the 1980s, 24,000 people were sentenced to death in one year alone.

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Middle East
4:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Egypt On Edge After A Week Of Deadly Violence

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

In Egypt, an emergency cabinet meeting is scheduled for today and more anti-government marches are planned by the Muslim Brotherhood and its supporters. The government says 173 people were killed in recent days, bringing the week's death toll to nearly 800, with more than a thousand arrested. As international criticism of the violence mounts, Egypt's stock market opened sharply lower and businesses are suspending operations out of security concerns.

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Middle East
4:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Attacks On Egypt's Christians Increase

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The violence that has gripped Egypt since the removal of President Mohamed Morsi has increased tensions between the majority Sunni Muslims and minority Christian communities. Reverend Mikhail is a Christian pastor in Alexandria. For safety concerns he asked us not to use his first name or the name of his church.

Reverend, first of all thank you very much for joining us.

REVEREND MIKHAIL: Thank you.

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Parallels
3:29 am
Sun August 18, 2013

What's Next For Egypt: 3 Scenarios

Supporters of the deposed Egyptian president, Mohammed Morsi, carry an injured demonstrator who was shot during clashes in Ramses Square in Cairo on Friday. Dozens were killed nationwide in escalating violence.
AMR ABDALLAH DALSH Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 10:27 am

For two years, the conversation on Egypt centered on how to build a democracy. Suddenly the discussion has turned much darker, with some wondering aloud whether the largest Arab nation is hurtling toward civil war.

The bloody crackdown by Egypt's security forces has raised the specter of a protracted conflict pitting the military against the Muslim Brotherhood, the country's most powerful political force.

Egypt's escalating crisis is far too volatile for any declarative statements, analysts say. But here are three possible scenarios that could play out:

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Middle East
3:29 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Obama Struggles To Find Effective Egypt Policy

President Obama delivers a statement on Egypt at his vacation home on Martha's Vineyard on Thursday.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 5:00 pm

The Obama administration is in a difficult situation with its Egypt policy.

President Obama, who often talks about free speech and human rights, has cancelled joint military exercises with Egypt but has stopped short of cutting off aid to the Egyptian military. As the violence continues in the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities, all sides seem unhappy with the U.S. approach.

In 2009, on his first trip to the Middle East as president, in the same year he won the Nobel Peace Prize, Obama spoke of a new approach to relations with the Islamic world.

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Middle East
3:13 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Turmoil In Egypt: Getting 'Back From The Brink'

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 3:47 pm

Amid violence in Egypt, there are reportedly calls for dismantling the Muslim Brotherhood, the party of ousted President Mohammed Morsi. Guest host Don Gonyea speaks with Shadi Hamid, the director of research for the Brookings Doha Center, about political and security issues in the country.

Middle East
3:13 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Egypt Continues To Slip Further Into Chaos, Violence

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 3:47 pm

Security forces cleared a central Cairo Mosque Saturday, where hundreds of supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi had gathered overnight. Hundreds of Muslim Brotherhood supporters have been arrested, charged with murder and terrorism. Guest host Don Gonyea speaks with NPR's Peter Kenyon about the ongoing crisis.

Parallels
12:18 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Muslim Brotherhood: A Force Throughout The Muslim World

Crowds gather around the burning headquarters of the Muslim Brotherhood in Cairo on Oct. 27, 1954. The building was set on fire following the attempted assassination of President Gamal Abdel Nasser.
AP

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 2:10 pm

The Muslim Brotherhood, which has a presence in dozens of Muslim countries, has been banned, repressed or restricted for much of its more than eight-decade history in Egypt, the place where it was born.

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NPR Story
8:42 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Gunfire Exchanged In Standoff At Cairo Mosque

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 5:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. And this week, Egypt witnessed the bloodiest day in its modern history. More than 600 people were killed, most are in a security crackdown on supporters of the ousted president, Mohamed Morsi. And it isn't over. Dozens more people have died since, some in citizen on citizen violence.

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The Two-Way
7:22 am
Sat August 17, 2013

NASA: Meteor In Russia Threw Up Globe-Girdling Plume Of Debris

A meteor trail is seen above a residential apartment block in the Urals city of Chelyabinsk on Feb. 15.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 6:19 pm

The bus-sized meteor that slammed into Russia in February, causing a massive shock-wave and injuring hundreds of people, sent a plume of dust into the stratosphere that circled the globe in just four days and lingered for months, NASA says.

The Feb. 15 meteor at Chelyabinsk near Russia's southern border with Kazakhstan measured 60 feet across and weighed 12,000 tons. It detonated 15 miles above the city.

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The Two-Way
6:13 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Dozens Dead, 'Huge' Number Missing In Philippine Ferry Sinking

A survivor cries as she arrives at hospital in Cebu after a ferry collided with a cargo ship in Cebu, central Philippines on Friday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:22 am

More than 30 people died and nearly 175 reportedly remained missing after a ferry collided with a cargo vessel and sank in the central Philippines.

Reuters reports that a gaping hole was left in the bow of the cargo ship after the collision with the ferry, MV Thomas Aquinas, on Friday near the country's second-largest city of Cebu:

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Europe
5:55 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Eurozone Rebound: Blip Or Trend?

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 5:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Earlier this week, the eurozone emerged from an 18-month long recession. The trading bloc's gross domestic product grew by 0.3 percent in the second quarter of this year but is one good quarter a blip or a trend and will it have any impact on the U.S. economy?

Simon Johnson is a professor at MIT and former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund. He joins us in the studios. Thanks very much.

SIMON JOHNSON: Thanks for having me.

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Middle East
5:43 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Despite Bloodshed, Many Egyptians Support Military

A pro-Morsi supporter stands with other demonstrators in Cairo's Abbassiya neighborhood on Friday.
Mohammed Abdel Moneim AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:16 am

Egypt witnessed the bloodiest day in its modern history this week. More than 600 people were killed, most during a security crackdown on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

And it isn't over. Dozens more have died since, some in citizen-on-citizen violence. A standoff is going on at a central Cairo mosque, and the nation is spiraling out of control.

Much of Egypt has little sympathy for Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood or their supporters.

'For The Good Of Egypt'

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Asia
4:02 am
Sat August 17, 2013

To Care For U.S. Kids, Filipinas Leave Their Own Behind

Lita and her son, Myke, now live in Houston together. She still works as a nanny and Myke is an interior designer. Lita's two daughters have also immigrated to the United States.
Ashley Westerman For NPR

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 2:53 pm

Few American mothers could fathom a situation that would force them to leave their country in order to put food in their children's bellies, clothes on their backs and send them to school. This is the reality for many Filipina women, who cross oceans in search of jobs that pay enough to provide for their families back home.

The Philippines is known worldwide for sending its citizens overseas to work, and a recent study has shown the country consistently deploys more women than men. In the United States, Filipinas are often nurses and caretakers; many work as nannies

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The Two-Way
4:59 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Kyrgyz Officials Shut Down Alcohol-Smuggling Pipeline

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:04 pm

A new pipeline between the Central Asian republics of Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan was until recently pumping away. Not oil, though — moonshine.

Customs and border officials in Kyrgyzstan uncovered the "makeshift underwater pipeline" on the bed of the Chu River, which divides the two countries. Officials think smugglers have sent thousands of liters of grain alcohol through the conduit from Kazakhstan.

The BBC writes:

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Latin America
3:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Peru's Natural Gas Rush Threatens Native Tribes, Again

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 9:15 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is one of the most critical tests for a developing economy: balancing development and the protection of human rights. It's currently playing out on the national stage in Peru. Several members of the president's cabinet have just resigned over plans to expand a gas field. It's in an area populated by tribes of Indians who have no contact with the outside world. Here's NPR's South America correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro.

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Africa
3:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Pickering: U.S. Has To Carefully Parse Its Response In Egypt

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:22 pm

Robert Siegel talks with former Ambassador Thomas Pickering about how the U.S. might approach the crisis in Egypt.

Africa
3:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

In Egypt, Another Day Of Clashes And Violence

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

For those seeking a peaceful resolution to the crisis in Egypt, it's been a discouraging day. Protest led to at least dozens of deaths, according to state figures. Muslim Brotherhood officials put the toll higher. The Brotherhood has called for another week of demonstrations.

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The Two-Way
2:56 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Embarrassed, Thai University Removes Anti-Cheating Hats

This is the photo of exam-taking Kasetsart University students that went viral.
Facebook via Coconuts Bangkok

Wandering eyes at test time is hardly a new problem, but a photo of one classroom's unique solution has proved an embarrassment for Kasetsart University in Thailand, The Bangkok Post reports.

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The Two-Way
1:38 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Hell With The Lid Off: Coffee Drinkers' Plight Exposed In Canada

"Is this coffee, or is this Fight Club?" That's the question Bryan Hansen of Calgary, Canada, says he asked himself after his coffee lid betrayed him — yet again — leading him to fire off a letter of complaint to the Tim Hortons café chain, sending it to the attention of its "Lid Manager."

Hansen's fiercely funny note won fans on Reddit and elsewhere, as fellow customers stood up to say they, too, had been suffering in (scalded) silence because of the coffee and pastry stores' flip-top lids.

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The Two-Way
10:50 am
Fri August 16, 2013

So Baaad It's Good: 'Sheep Protest' Video

YouTube.com/haywiredigital

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 12:16 pm

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Barbershop
9:24 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Could Prison Spell The End Of The Jackson Dynasty?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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BackTalk
9:24 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Mali's Challenger Concedes, As Zimbabwe Fights Election Results

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And now it's time for BackTalk. That's where we hear from you, the listener. Editor Ahmad Omar is here with us once again. What's going on, Ahmad?

AMMAD OMAR, BYLINE: Hey, Celeste. I wanted to start with some news updates. A couple weeks ago, we talked about two big elections in Africa...

HEADLEE: ...Right.

OMAR: ...And we have some updates on those races this week.

HEADLEE: OK, let's hear them.

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Around the Nation
9:24 am
Fri August 16, 2013

'Dream 9' Immigrant Says Don't Think Of Issue Politically

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
4:43 am
Fri August 16, 2013

In Egypt: 'Day Of Rage' Adds To Body Count

A man in Cairo who said he had been wounded by a rubber bullet Friday gets help.
Andre Pain EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 8:55 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Peter Kenyon, in Cairo, talks with host David Greene

(We updated the top of this post at 4:50 p.m. ET. For other updates, click here.)

With the Muslim Brotherhood marching in Cairo and other Egyptian cities in a "day of rage" over the deadly crackdown on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, this week's alarming body count went higher on Friday.

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Middle East
3:45 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Egypt's Army To Use Live Ammunition To Keep Order

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 8:30 am

Egypt's Interior Ministry has authorized the use of deadly force against protesters targeting police and state institutions. The death toll has surpassed 600 since Wednesday and spread outside the bloody crackdown in Cairo against supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

Middle East
3:45 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Muslim Brotherhood Calls For A 'Day Of Anger' Across Egypt

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:05 am

The Muslim Brotherhood has called for a mass rally on Friday in a challenge to the government's declaration of a month-long state of emergency and a dusk-to-dawn curfew. David Greene talks to Mona al-Qazzaz, a spokeswoman for the Muslim Brotherhood in London.

Middle East
3:45 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Obama Condemns Crackdown In Egypt

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:29 am

President Obama is canceling joint military exercises with Egypt and condemning the violence that is taking place there. But the administration has stopped short of suspending aid to the Egyptian military. The U.S. faces a policy conundrum in Egypt, which has long played a key role in regional stability.

Sports
3:45 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Athletes Speak Out Against Russia's Anti-Gay Law

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:33 am

Controversy over Russia's new anti-gay law is affecting this year's World Athletic Championships. Athletes who are in Moscow for the games are speaking out about the law. How athletes are reacting could be a test for what's to come at the Sochi Olympics.

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