World News

Europe
2:58 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

French Government Organizes Massive Manhunt To Find Gunmen

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 4:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
2:58 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Unemployment, Deflation Felt Acutely In Spain

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 1:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Spain's economy is growing again but not fast enough to bring a sky-high employment rate and not fast enough to boost wages either. Spain, like the rest of Europe, has deflation concerns. Lauren Frayer reports from Madrid.

(SOUNDBITE OF HOLIDAY MUSIC)

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The Two-Way
2:29 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

French Media, Public Rally Behind 'Charlie Hebdo'

Pens are thrown on the ground during a vigil in Paris following a deadly attack at the offices of Charlie Hebdo, the weekly satirical magazine.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:58 pm

This much is certain: Charlie Hebdo will live another day.

The magazine, which was the target of a deadly attack Wednesday, will be kept going through financial and editorial backing from some of France's largest media groups.

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Goats and Soda
2:24 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

A Cow Head Will Not Erupt From Your Body If You Get A Smallpox Vaccine

This did not really happen. Cows' heads did not emerge from the bodies of people newly inoculated against smallpox. But fear of the vaccine was so widespread that it prompted British satirist James Gillray to create this spoof in 1802.
H. Humphrey Henry Barton Jacobs Collection, Institute of the History of Medicine, JHU

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 4:17 pm

It all started with milkmaids.

Edward Jenner, an 18th-century English country doctor, noticed that they seemed to be immune to smallpox.

And that was a time when smallpox was a truly terrifying disease. Each year, it killed hundreds of thousands of Europeans. It made people terribly sick. Its oozing blisters scarred many of its victims for life. And there was no cure.

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Parallels
1:53 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Life Flows Back Into The Waters Of Baghdad's Tigris

Young members of the Baghdad Rowing Club practice on the river Tigris, close to the University of Mustansiriyah in the Iraqi capital.
Alice Fordham NPR

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 11:15 pm

Some of the world's loveliest cities hug great rivers. Budapest curves around the Danube, London's gracious gray buildings look out on the Thames.

Baghdad doesn't conjure so easily the idea of lingering on a bridge, watching boats glide by, but the city's river Tigris is as wide and wet as the Seine or the Nile, and Baghdadis have fun on it too.

Last weekend, moored next to the Mutanabbi Street book market was a big white party boat, with tinsel and silk roses festooning its rails and pop music shaking its deck.

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Parallels
10:20 am
Wed January 7, 2015

A Magazine Staff Is Slaughtered, A French Nightmare Is Realized

French soldiers patrol in front of the Eiffel Tower on Wednesday, after heavily armed gunmen stormed the offices of Charlie Hebdo and killed at least 12 people β€” the deadliest attack in France in four decades.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 12:40 pm

When a 2011 firebombing destroyed the office of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, editor Stephane Charbonnier said the publication would not shy away from taking jabs at radical Islam.

"If we can poke fun at everything in France, if we can talk about anything in France apart from Islam or the consequences of Islamism, that is annoying," Charbonnier said at the time. "This is the first time we have been physically attacked, but we won't let it get to us."

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News
8:25 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Between Speech And Religion, Freedoms Often Spell Friction

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 10:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
7:35 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Education Plan: Sell Goat, Ride Bus 300 Miles, Sneak Into Prez's House

When he was 11 years old, James Arinaitwe boarded a bus with a crazy plan: Sneak into the president's house and beg for a high school scholarship.
Claire Eggers NPR

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 8:43 am

What does it take to get a high school diploma? For James Kassaga Arinaitwe, it came down to a goat, a 300-mile journey and crashing the president's guarded house.

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Europe
5:43 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Gunmen Storm Satirical Magazine's Office In Paris

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 11:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Africa
3:27 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Shell Reaches Settlement Over Oil Spills In Niger Delta

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 10:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
2:54 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Obama And Mexican President Talk Cuba, Immigration

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 7:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
2:54 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Anti-Muslim Rallies Grow In Germany

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 4:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
12:59 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Teaching Nurses How To Speak Up β€” And Speak Gently

Chief nursing officer Marc Julmisse (in glasses) leads nursing rounds inside the neonatal intensive care unit of the University Hospital in Mirebalais, Haiti.
Rebecca E. Rollins Partners in Health

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 10:41 am

Teach someone to fish, the saying goes, and they'll eat for a lifetime. Teach a nurse to become more involved in helping people heal, and patients could enjoy a longer life. That's the philosophy behind training nurses to mentor other nurses, says Sheila Davis, chief nursing officer and chief of Ebola response for Partners in Health, the worldwide nonprofit organization.

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Parallels
12:41 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

With The Saudi King Ailing, Succession Speculation Begins

King Abdullah (right) and Crown Prince Salman (left) are shown in this 2012 poster. The king, who is at least 90, was hospitalized last week and Salman on Tuesday stepped in for the monarch and delivered an annual televised speech to the nation.
FAYEZ NURELDINE AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 6:47 pm

Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah is ill, the kingdom is facing the lowest oil prices in years (partly by choice) and it remains locked in a regional rivalry with Iran.

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The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

In Reversal, Belgium Denies Inmate's Request To Die

Frank Van Den Bleeken, seen here at a court hearing last fall, will be sent to a psychiatric center instead of being allowed to die from euthanasia. He had been scheduled to die on Sunday.
VIRGINIE LEFOUR AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 12:52 pm

Days before he was scheduled to die, inmate Frank Van Den Bleeken has been told he won't be allowed to die from an assisted suicide, despite his request. Last fall, a court approved a deal that would have allowed him to end his life.

The planned euthanasia was called off this week, after the doctor who was to oversee the procedure backed out. Belgian justice officials said Tuesday that they will work out a better solution for Van Den Bleeken.

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The Two-Way
10:12 am
Tue January 6, 2015

Germany Turns Off The Lights To Protest Growing Anti-Islam Movement

The lights at Cologne Cathedral are switched off Monday to make a statement against PEGIDA.
Maja Hitij EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 11:23 am

Germany has turned off the lights at some of its most famous monuments. It's part of a counterdemonstration against recent marches nationwide by a group protesting what its supporters see as the "Islamization of Europe."

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The Two-Way
10:06 am
Tue January 6, 2015

Palestinian Sentenced To 3 Life Terms Over Murder Of Israeli Teens

An Israeli woman holds a poster with photos of three Israeli teens, who were killed in the summer of 2014.
Oded Balilty AP

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 11:17 am

A military court in Israel sentenced a Palestinian man to three life terms in prison over the murder of three Israeli teens.

The case of the three students launched widespread searches that led to clashes between Israeli forces and Palestinians. After the three bodies were found, Israel invaded Gaza and a 50-day war erupted.

Haaretz reports:

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Business
8:57 am
Tue January 6, 2015

How A Too-Strong Dollar Might Lead To A Too-Weak World

If the dollar gets too expensive, U.S. exports like heavy equipment made by Caterpillar can get priced out of the market.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 11:53 am

It's flattering to be King of the Hill.

And these days, the U.S. dollar is wearing the crown. It has climbed to its highest point in 11 years, with global investors pushing it ahead of the euro and other major currencies.

But while it's a compliment to have a strong dollar, the honor is not without its downsides. When the dollar rises against other currencies, it increases risks to U.S. manufacturers.

So economists are looking for signs that a good thing may be starting to go too far. These questions and answers may help explain what's happening.

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Tue January 6, 2015

Jordanian Prince To Challenge 4-Term FIFA Chief For Presidency

FIFA Vice President Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein says he will challenge incumbent Sepp Blatter for the presidency of soccer's governing body.
Lai Seng Sin AP

FIFA Vice President Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein will challenge incumbent Sepp Blatter for the presidency of soccer's governing body.

"I am seeking the presidency of FIFA because I believe it is time to shift the focus away from administrative controversy and back to sport," he said in a statement on the website of the Jordan Football Association, of which he is president.

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Law
4:16 am
Tue January 6, 2015

2 Americans Face Charges Over Gambia Coup Attempt

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 8:34 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Parallels
3:00 am
Tue January 6, 2015

The Russian Who Claims Credit For Fanning The Flames In Ukraine

Igor Girkin, a Russian citizen who headed the pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine last year, walks with his bodyguards in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk in July.
Alexander Khudoteply AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 11:16 am

Last spring, eastern Ukraine was a struggling, rust-belt region of mines and metal works. Now it's a battle zone where armies face off with heavy weapons, and where nearly 5,000 people have died.

In Russia, one man claims to have touched off the conflagration, and he says he's proud of what he did. His name is Igor Girkin, and he has a knack for turning up in tumultuous places.

In this instance, Girkin made his appearance in April of last year, shortly after Ukraine's pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovych was ousted after months of street protests.

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NPR Story
3:00 am
Tue January 6, 2015

Lebanon Imposes Restrictions On Syrian Refugees

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 8:34 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:00 am
Tue January 6, 2015

2 Promising U.S. Skiers Killed In Alps Avalanche

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 8:34 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
3:06 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

India's Philanthropist-Surgeon Delivers Cardiac Care Henry Ford-Style

Dr. Devi Shetty meets with a patient. The surgeon, who says heart disease is on the rise in India, has never turned away a patient who had no money to pay.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 5:14 pm

Heart surgery is a spectacle to behold. Even more so to see it on a mass scale, which is what happens at the Narayana Health, a state-of-the-art medical center in the southern Indian city of Bangalore.

I am invited to scrub up and witness renowned surgeon Dr. Devi Shetty at work. The operating room is a symphony of all things medical: monitors beeping out a metronome-like rhythm, forceps and scissors clanging onto metal tables, a heart-lung machine gurgling as it does the work of the patient's stopped heart, and, curiously, pop music drifting though the room.

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The Salt
2:42 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

In Spain, A Kingly Ring With A Hidden Surprise Wraps Up The Holidays

The classic Spanish roscΓ³n is an aromatic, citrus-infused brioche topped by sugar, flaked almonds and candied fruits – arranged like the jewels on a king's crown. It's ubiquitous on Spanish tables on Three Kings Day, Jan. 6.
James Badcock for NPR

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 4:27 pm

The first time I visited my in-laws in Spain, they fed me a sweet, doughy treat that, for a brief moment, made me wonder whether they were trying to kill me.

You see, it was Jan. 6, el Dia de Reyes – or Three Kings Day β€” which commemorates the visit of the magi to the baby Jesus. My hospitable in-laws had laid out a delicious roscΓ³n, a ring-shaped cake delicately flavored with orange blossom water. But as I tucked into this scrumptious offering, my teeth struck something very, very hard.

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Parallels
2:31 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Yoga, Petting Puppies, Halloween: Banned By Malaysia's Muslim Clerics

The winner of Miss Malaysia World 2013, Melinder Kaur Bhullar, poses during the grand finale on Aug. 2, 2013, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Four Muslim women were dropped as contestants after a religious decree, or fatwa, barred them from participating.
Rahman Roslan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 3:16 pm

All Muslims know pork, booze and premarital canoodling violate Islamic teachings. But in Malaysia, home to a rising tide of fundamentalist Islam, senior clerics are warning against more insidious dangers to the faith.

Such as death metal. And puppies. And Valentine's Day.

Malaysia is a bastion of Islam in tropical Southeast Asia. It's also a nation of mallgoers and Instagram addicts. Many in Malaysia see themselves as both devout and cosmopolitan. Their ethos extols mosques and skyscrapers alike.

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Middle East
2:23 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Under Strain From Syrian Refugees, Lebanon Enacts Stricter Visa Policy

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 4:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Lebanon has no ability to receive more refugees.

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Goats and Soda
2:23 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

In The World's Rape Capital, Doctors Fight Violence With Science

Dr Dieudonne Masemo Bihehe and Dr. Tina Amissi are physicians at Panzi Hospital in Bukavu, now doing research through ICART, a new research center to support Congolese scholarship.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 6:17 pm

Tina Amissi grew up in a small village in the Democratic Republic of Congo with 26 brothers and sisters. When her mother insisted she drop out of school and help out around the house, it was her polygamous father β€” and his iron authority β€” who saved her.

Amissi's father supported her dream to go to medical school in the city of Bukavu. Even now, she gets so excited recounting the story that she can't stop from clapping.

"My father said, 'You'll leave your mother?' " Amissi recalls. "I said, 'Yes, yes, yes, yes, I'm going.' "

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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

In Latest Sign Of Strain, Lebanon Demands That Syrians Get Visas

Syrian children play at a refugee camp in Terbol, Lebanon, in 2013. More than 1 million Syrian refugees are in Lebanon, which is now requiring Syrians to obtain visas before entering the country.
Sharif Karim Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 1:55 pm

The flood of Syrian refugees has been straining Lebanon for several years, and the Lebanese have now responded by imposing visa restrictions on Syria for the first time ever.

Residents from the neighboring Arab states have traditionally been able to travel back and forth easily despite relations that have often been tumultuous. But more than 1 million Syrian refugees have entered Lebanon since Syria's civil war began in 2011, placing a huge burden on Lebanon, a country of just 4 million people.

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The Two-Way
11:59 am
Mon January 5, 2015

U.S. Charges 2 Americans Over Attempted Coup In The Gambia

Residents walk on an empty street in Banjul Gambia, Tuesday, Dec. 30. Heavy gunfire rang out Tuesday near the presidential palace, raising the specter of a coup attempt.
Jason Florio AP

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 1:16 pm

You may have seen a minor headline last week, saying the United States denied any involvement in a failed coup attempt in The Gambia.

Today, we're getting a bit of insight into what actually happened there.

The Justice Department said it arrested and charged two Americans who allegedly planned and then unsuccessfully tried to carry out a coup against President Yahya Jammeh.

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