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Egypt's President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi says he was the first foreign head of state to pick up the phone to congratulate U.S. President-elect Donald Trump. But Sissi isn't the only hard-line leader vying to be Trump's best foreign friend.

In the Middle East, Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe, leaders known for tough policies that have brought frequent criticism from human rights groups have been quick to hail the results of the U.S. elections.

People and leprosy go way back. Way, way back.

"It's been around for at least 5,000 years and probably longer," says Stewart Cole, who directs the Global Health Institute at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

She's a former refugee, a Muslim, a mom of three, and now the first Somali-American lawmaker in the United States.

"This really was a victory for that 8-year-old in that refugee camp," Ilhan Omar, 34, said. "This was a victory for the young woman being forced into child marriage. This was a victory for every person that's been told they have limits on their dreams."

A top Chinese police official has been elected president of Interpol, the global police agency. The move could help China with its anti-corruption drive, but rights groups are worried that Beijing might use the organization to track down political dissidents.

Interpol member countries elected China's vice minister of public security, Meng Hongwei, on Thursday at a general assembly meeting in Bali, Indonesia. "I am a veteran policeman," Meng said during a speech. "And I stand ready to do everything I can towards the cause of policing in the world."

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To celebrate Renee Montagne's last week hosting Morning Edition, we listen back to some of her favorite stories, including a piece about schoolgirls in Kandahar, Afghanistan. This story originally aired Nov. 25, 2010.

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During his campaign, President-elect Donald Trump often was fuzzy on details of his economic plans.

But he was clear about one goal: getting much tougher on trade relations with our most important partners, i.e., China, Canada and Mexico.

Analysts say they don't doubt he will follow through. "We are definitely shifting to a world where the landscape is far less favorable to trade," said Eswar Prasad, professor of trade policy at Cornell University.

These are the three most likely steps to be taken in this new environment:

No one knows what the Trump administration has planned for U.S. foreign aid programs and other global initiatives that fight poverty and disease.

There are some topics that Donald Trump has not addressed. Global advocacy groups such as the ONE Campaign have tried to get Trump to share his ideas of how to "tackle extreme poverty" on the record. After a year of campaigning, he still hasn't responded.

They traded compliments during the campaign. Those comments then became part of the campaign itself. And now that Donald Trump has won the U.S. presidential election, Russian President Vladimir Putin has congratulated him and raised the prospect of a fresh start in U.S.-Russia relations.

Here at Goats and Soda, we're trying something new: We'd like to know what you want us to investigate. Our first call-out was about girls in the developing world. And last week, we asked you to submit questions on global diseases.

Judges in China are jailing 49 people on charges tied to deadly explosions at a warehouse in the port city of Tianjin that killed at least 165 people in August 2015.

This was one of China's worst-ever industrial tragedies. The people sentenced include 25 government officials and 24 staffers of the companies involved, according to China's state-run Xinhua news agency. The verdicts were issued from ten different courts during the last three days.

The green-eyed Afghan woman who famously appeared on the cover of National Geographic is back in her native country after being deported from Pakistan, where she had resided for more than three decades.

Afghanistan's president, Ashraf Ghani, welcomed the return of Sharbat Gula at a ceremony held at the presidential palace in Kabul on Wednesday.

There's an expression in French, "Jamais deux sans trois," or "Never two without three." After Brexit and Trump, will Marine Le Pen be next?

France holds its presidential election next spring, and Le Pen, the leader of the country's far-right National Front party, could well be one of the top two candidates in the first round of voting, which would propel her to the second-round runoff in May 2017. But she hasn't been seriously considered as a candidate who could actually become president.

Until now.

A few months ago, neurosurgeon Jocelyne Bloch emerged from a 10-hour surgery that she hadn't done before.

"Most of my patients are humans," says Bloch, who works at the Lausanne University Hospital in Switzerland.

This patient was a rhesus macaque.

The monkey's spinal cord had been partially cut. So while his brain was fine and his legs were fine, the two couldn't communicate.

As the world woke up Wednesday to Donald Trump's presidential election victory, congratulations from foreign leaders were mixed with worries about how Trump's provocative campaign pronouncements will be translated into policy.

Russian President Vladimir Putin sent a telegram — yes, a telegram — to congratulate Trump. But Putin also addressed the troubled state of relations between the two countries.

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Canada's Immigration and Citizenship website was down for hours Tuesday and Wednesday — apparently due to a spike in searches by Americans reacting to Tuesday's presidential election. Access was cut off on Election Day; the site was brought back online shortly after 10 a.m. ET.

Prosecutors raided the offices of Samsung Electronics on Tuesday as part of an investigation into a presidential cronyism scandal that's gripped South Korea.

While it is a near-monthly occurrence for a chaebol (family-owned conglomerate) in Korea to be under investigation and/or raided by prosecutors as a result — and they're usually slightly staged affairs — the reason for this week's raid of Samsung is more obscure: elite horse competitions!

Leaders from 195 countries are meeting in Morocco to discuss how to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions.

The United Nations climate change conference began Monday and runs through Nov. 18. It is the first major climate meeting since the Paris climate change agreement was passed at last year's conference.

In a surprise move, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced that the country is taking all existing 500 and 1,000 rupee notes out of circulation.

He said in a televised speech that voiding the country's highest-denomination bills is aimed at cracking down on the black market and getting counterfeit cash out of the financial system. The black market boosts corruption and is used to fund terrorism, he said.

A preliminary deal between Iran and France's Total SA to develop an offshore Persian Gulf gas field represents the first investment by a Western energy company since international sanctions were relaxed earlier this year.

The $6 billion deal between Total and Iran's state-owned Petropars includes the participation of China National Petroleum Corp. in a consortium to develop what's known as the South Pars field estimated to contain 14,000 billion cubic meters of gas, or about 8 percent of the known global reserves.

As if our collective blood pressure weren't already sky-high today, a video showing a marine iguana hatchling chased by a pit of snakes is setting the Internet on fire.

It's the "first time snakes have been filmed hunting en masse," according to the BBC.

Take a look:

For decades, global trade has been transforming the world's economy, bringing Japanese and Korean cars to North American highways, U.S. software to European computers and German machine tools to Asian factories.

But the days of explosive trade growth may be at an end.

The dollar value of world merchandise (or non-services) exports fell from $19 trillion in 2014 to $16.6 trillion last year, a decline of 13.3 percent, according to the World Bank.


Conventional wisdom would have you drink red wine with cheese. A new study, published in the Journal of Food Science, only partially supports that pairing, and also adds a new tool to the scientific study of food combinations.

"Red wine with cheese, it can either go really well or not that well," says Mara Galmarini, a sensory scientist at CONICET, the Argentinian National Scientific and Technical Research Council. "A white wine, you have less risk."

Nigeria is deploying 100 female police officers to protect women in displaced persons camps in the state of Borno, after a scathing Human Rights Watch report said officials, including security guards, have "raped and sexually exploited" dozens of women.

These are women who fled from the extremist militant organization Boko Haram in northern Nigeria — and as Human Rights Watch reported, they have now become "victims twice over."

On this Election Day, Secretary of State John Kerry is traveling just about as far from Washington, D.C., as he can go. He's on his way to Antarctica, becoming the first secretary of state to visit all seven continents after logging well over a million miles while in office.

The highest court in the Philippines has voted to allow the body of the country's former dictator, Ferdinand Marcos, to be buried in the Heroes' Cemetery outside Manila.

The court ruled 9 to 5 against a challenge that would have blocked the burial, brought by victims of Marcos's regime. As Michael Sullivan reports:

Speaking in North Carolina on the final day of the presidential campaign, Republican nominee Donald Trump urged voters to go to the polls and deliver an Election Day upset.

"It's going to be Brexit plus, plus, plus," he said Monday, referring to the surprise victory in last June's referendum in which the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union.

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