U.S. News

The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Cold Crime: Jell-O Stolen From Work Fridge Sparks Police Call

The limits of workplace theft are being tested in Pennsylvania, where a man called police this month to complain that his Jell-O had been stolen. The flavor was strawberry, he said. And it wasn't the first instance of fridge-theft.

The story comes from Philadelphia's CBS KYW-TV:

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It's All Politics
4:03 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

5 Questions Kathleen Sebelius Must Answer

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius is likely to have a very long day when she testifies before Congress about the Affordable Care Act website problems.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 5:12 pm

The hottest hot seat in Washington is the one occupied by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, whose office confirmed Monday she'll testify about the Internet disaster that is HealthCare.gov, the Affordable Care Act website.

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The Two-Way
3:18 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Government Shutdown Delays Rocket Launch

A Minotaur I at Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.
NASA

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:36 am

The launch of a rocket carrying a record-breaking 29 satellites — originally set for early next month — will be delayed by a few weeks after the partial government shutdown halted preparations.

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Economy
3:07 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Volkswagen Union Opposed By Tennessee Republican Officials

Volkswagen's car plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., is the company's only one in the U.S. It's also the only VW plant around the world without a workers union.
Volkswagen

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:10 am

When it comes to union organizing at an auto plant, the tension is typically between the workers and the management. But not at Volkswagen in Tennessee. There, the United Auto Workers is attempting to finally unionize the automaker's first foreign-owned plant in the South. And so far, Republican officials are the ones trying to stand in the way.

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Around the Nation
2:59 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

In Gritty Camden, N.J., Old-School Tactics And New Tech Cut Crime

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Cities often strive to break records. But we have a story now of one city, Camden, New Jersey and the record it's trying desperately not to break: The record for most murders in a year.

Twenty-twelve was a bad year for Camden and, as Elizabeth Fiedler of member station WHYY reports, a new county police force is doing all it can to make 2013 safer.

ELIZABETH FIEDLER, BYLINE: On a wall in Camden County Police Chief Scott Thomson's office, hangs a painting of George Washington kneeling in the snow next to a horse.

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Technology
2:59 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Small Kentucky Town Makes High-Tech Glass Amid Bucolic Farmland

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 9:08 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

I'm Melissa Block. And it's time now for All Tech Considered. This week, we visit the small farming town of Harrodsburg, Kentucky. It's the home of something called Willow Glass, glass that's super thin and flexible and soon find its way into the high-tech marketplace. It's made by Corning in the same plant that developed Gorilla Glass, that's the stuff Apple uses to make the protective cover for its iPhone.

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Religion
2:59 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

At A Younger Age, Mormon Women Are Eager To Share Their Faith

Alisa Baumgartner chats with fellow missionary Andrea Jackson. Jackson, 19, is taking 18 months off from college to do mission work.
Stina Sieg KJZZ

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 2:29 pm

Tara Carpenter points to a wall map to show where she'll soon spend 18 months proselytizing.

"The left side of Kentucky, just a teeny, tiny bit of Illinois, and I think I'm a little bit in Missouri," she says.

Carpenter, 19, is smiley and outgoing. About a year ago, she was thinking about going on a mission — but only thinking about it, because women in the Mormon Church couldn't be missionaries until 21.

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Around the Nation
2:59 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Shooting At Nev. Middle School Leaves Two Dead, Two Wounded

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

There's news today of another school shooting. This one in Nevada, at Sparks Middle School near Reno. Two people are dead - a teacher and a student who's believed to be the gunman. Two other students were injured and are in the hospital. NPR's Ted Robbins has more.

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Around the Nation
2:59 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Gay Couples Tie Knot In New Jersey As Christie Backs Down

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Governor Chris Christie has dropped his legal challenge to same-sex marriage in New Jersey. His announcement came just hours after same-sex couples there began tying the knot for the first time.

As NPR's Joel Rose reports, Christie's decision means New Jersey is effectively the 14th state to recognize same-sex marriage.

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All Tech Considered
2:12 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

The HealthCare.gov 'Tech Surge' Is Racing Against The Clock

HealthCare.gov has been plagued with problems since the health insurance exchange site opened Oct. 1.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:10 am

A "tech surge" is underway to help clean up the code of the error-plagued HealthCare.gov site.

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The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Fugitive Arrest: Former Banking Executive Caught In Italy

Former UBS banking executive Raoul Weil was indicted by a U.S. federal grand jury in 2008, on charges that he helped wealthy clients avoid billions in taxes.
Antonio Calanni AP

A former UBS bank executive who has been a fugitive since being indicted on federal charges in 2008 has been arrested in Italy. Swiss citizen Raoul Weil, the former head of UBS Global Wealth Management International, is accused of defrauding the U.S. government by helping clients evade taxes.

From Rome, NPR's Sylvia Poggioli filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Salt
1:20 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Two Bagger

The truth is in there.
NPR

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 3:21 pm

A food named for its size sets a certain expectation. When you order a McDonald's Quarter Pounder, or Taco Bell's Acre of Beans, you expect volume and satisfaction.

Could the Two Bagger from Lucky's Sandwich Co. here in Chicago, topped with corned beef, pastrami, cole slaw, french fries and cheese, promise even more?

Eva: Two Bags are the only clothes that fit me now.

Robert: Should I be worried they got the two bags out of the front seat pocket of an airplane?

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Law
10:00 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Combating Domestic Violence: One Size Doesn't Fit All

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 4:58 pm

More than 1 in 3 women in the United States will experience physical violence, rape or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetimes.

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The Two-Way
9:20 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Supreme Court Will Hear Case On Executions And Mental Disability

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 12:40 pm

The standard by which a person is judged to be mentally competent enough to face execution for a crime will be reviewed by the U.S. Supreme Court, which agreed Monday to hear a Florida case revolving around that issue.

The capital punishment case, Hall, Freddie L. v. Fla., centers on the standard for judging mental disability and how state officials arrive at that judgment. The case will be argued in Washington early in 2014.

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The Protojournalist
9:19 am
Mon October 21, 2013

The Mist And Mystique Of Dry Ice

makes snow in the lab using dry ice." href="/post/mist-and-mystique-dry-ice" class="noexit lightbox">
Vincent Schaefer, one of the General Electric scientists who worked on Project Cirrus in the 1940s, makes snow in the lab using dry ice.
General Electric

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 5:29 pm

Several prank bombs caused paranoia at Los Angeles International Airport last week. One — packed in a 20-ounce soda bottle — exploded in a restroom, one on the tarmac and a third was found just fizzling.

No one was injured.

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Shots - Health News
1:05 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Should Severe Premenstrual Symptoms Be A Mental Disorder?

Women's moods can change based on the phases of their menstrual cycle. But does that mean they have a psychiatric disorder?
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 1:37 pm

The way Ronna Simmons of Philadelphia describes it, every two weeks a timer goes off.

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Science
3:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

Climate Watcher Says He's Done With Flying

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:02 pm

Meteorologist Eric Holthaus has made his career monitoring the Earth's climate, and he's alarmed at what he sees. After reading a new, bleak international report on climate change, Holthaus has decided one important way to reduce his carbon footprint is to give up airplane travel for good.

Around the Nation
3:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

World's Eyes On Washington's New Recreational Pot Rules

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:02 pm

Washington State has finalized rules for recreational marijuana sales, joining Colorado in beginning to create a legal framework for the pot industry. Randy Simmons, deputy director of the Washington Liquor Control Board, says other states and even other countries are watching Washington's developing system very closely.

Science
3:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

To Fix Climate Change, Scientists Turn To Hacking The Earth

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 12:52 pm

In the summer of 2012, a small group of the Haida people, a native community in Canada, had a problem. The salmon they rely on were disappearing. So the Haida took matters into their own hands.

They partnered with an American businessman, drew up plans and then took a boat full of iron dust into the waters off their home island and put the dust in the ocean.

When they spread the iron dust, it created a big algae bloom. They hoped the algae would soak up carbon dioxide and bring back the fish.

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Health
5:47 am
Sun October 20, 2013

With Addiction, Breaking A Habit Means Resisting A Reflex

Addiction can come in a lot of forms, but the characteristics are the same.
aurumarcus Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 9:27 am

The pull of addiction can come from many directions: from food to alcohol to the Internet. So what connects those dependencies?

"Addiction is a memory, it's a reflex. It's training your brain in something which is harmful to yourself," says Dr. Charles P. O'Brien, co-founder of the Center for Studies of Addiction at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Code Switch
4:14 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Asian-American Band Fights To Trademark Name 'The Slants'

The Slants' band members are all of Asian descent.
Courtesy of The Slants

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 8:08 am

The Slants, a six-member band from Portland, Ore., calls their sound "Chinatown Dance Rock" — a little bit New Order, a little bit Depeche Mode. They describe themselves as one of the first Asian-American rock bands. Their music caters to an Asian-American crowd, they've spoken at various Asian-American events, and they're proud of all of it.

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Media
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

What Glenn Greenwald Could Gain From New Media Venture

Glenn Greenwald, who first reported the disclosures of U.S. surveillance programs, is now leaving The Guardian to work with eBay founder Pierre Omidyar on a new journalism venture.
Silvia Izquierdo AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:58 am

Glenn Greenwald, who broke the story about the U.S. government's massive surveillance program, is quitting The Guardian. He's leaving the British daily and joining a journalism startup with eBay founder and billionaire philanthropist Pierre Omidyar.

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Technology
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

When Playing Video Games Means Sitting On Life's Sidelines

The reSTART center for Internet addiction is in the woods outside Seattle. The initial, inpatient part of the program is held on a property that has a treehouse and a garden.
Rachel Martin NPR

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 2:49 pm

A facility outside Seattle, surrounded by pine trees, is a refuge for addicts — of technology.

There are chickens, a garden and a big treehouse with a zip line. A few guys kick a soccer ball around between therapy appointments in the cottage's grassy backyard.

The reSTART center was set up in 2009. It treats all sorts of technology addictions, but most of the young men who come through here — and they are all young men — have the biggest problem with video games.

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World
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Saudi Act Of Protest Stuns U.N., And Some Observers

The U.N. Security Council votes on a resolution requiring Syria to give up its chemical weapons last month in New York. Last week, Saudi Arabia turned down a chance to take a seat on the Council.
Craig Ruttle AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:58 am

Known for quiet diplomacy, Saudi Arabia is taking an unusual and very public step to protest the international community's failure to resolve the crisis in Syria and other issues that interest Riyadh.

On Thursday, Saudi Arabia was elected to become a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, which the Saudi ambassador to the U.N. initially called a defining moment in his nation's history.

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Parallels
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

You Have Questions About The NSA; We Have Answers

A sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 2:48 pm

Four months have passed since former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden began spilling secrets about the NSA's surveillance programs, but many Americans still don't know what to think about the disclosures.

For good reason. The surveillance programs are highly technical, involving the bulk interception of huge volumes of communication data as they traverse multiple links and networks. The laws governing what the NSA can do are complex and open to conflicting interpretations.

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The Salt
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Unleashed On Halloween, Monster Cereals Haunt Hoarders

This Halloween season, the three big Monster Cereals will be joined by Frute Brute and Fruity Yummy Mummy, which haven't been on the market in decades.
Dan Pashman

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 1:11 pm

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Around the Nation
4:04 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

For Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, A Mixed Midterm Report Card

Former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel speaks at his election night party on Feb. 22, 2011, in Chicago. As mayor of Chicago, Emanuel has faced major challenges, ranging from a ballooning deficit to education, the economy and crime.
Kiichiro Sato AP

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 4:41 pm

A little more than two years ago, Chicago's then-mayor-elect, Rahm Emanuel, expressed his gratitude to supporters on election night.

"Thank you Chicago, for this humbling victory," he told the crowd. "You sure know how to make a guy feel at home."

But today, Emanuel faces sobering challenges common to most of American's biggest cities.

Not only are schools troubled, Chicago's homicide rate spiked last year — a total of 516 murders — the highest in 10 years. Unemployment is 9 percent. And the city's deficit is looming near the $1 billion mark.

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Sports
3:10 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

Pitching Like It's 1860, Teams Play Ball With Vintage Flair

The Essex Base Ball Organization, a vintage baseball league, holds its games on a farm in Newburyport, Mass.
Edgar B. Herwick III for NPR

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 1:54 am

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The Two-Way
8:30 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Shedding Stereotypes, More Librarians Show Us Their Tats

Jennifer Galpern, August
Kate Fischer Rhode Island Library Association

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 11:56 am

Is it their love of ink?

There seems to be something about tattoos that appeals to quite a few librarians.

Back in 2009 there was the Texas Library Association's "Tattooed Ladies of TLA" calendar that raised money for libraries damaged by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

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The Two-Way
7:05 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Police Capture 2 Florida Prison Escapees Who Used Phony Documents

Convicted killer Joseph Jenkins in a photograph taken on Sept. 20 by the Orange County,Fla., Sheriff's Office — after he escaped from prison. Jenkins went to the Orange County Jail to register as a felon.
AP

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 6:23 pm

(Updated 8:10 p.m. ET)

The Associated Press reports that two convicted murderers from Florida who used phony documents to escape prison were arrested Saturday night without incident at a motel in Panama City, Fla.

According to the AP:

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