U.S. News

The Two-Way
6:51 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Cardinals Get A Walk-Off World Series Win On Bizarre Play

Home plate umpire Dana DeMuth points to third base, where an obstruction call awarded the St. Louis Cardinals' Allen Craig home plate — and the winning run in Game 3 of the World Series — Saturday night. Boston Red Sox catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia and Koji Uehara were dismayed by the call.
Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 12:27 pm

  • Hear Tom Goldman's Report On 'Weekend Edition'

Game 3 of the World Series ended in unusual fashion Saturday night, as a ninth-inning obstruction call on Boston third baseman Will Middlebrooks resulted in umpires awarding a base to St. Louis' Allen Craig — bringing the winning run home and putting the Cardinals ahead in the series, 2-1.

It's reportedly the first time an obstruction call has ended a World Series game. And it brought an end to a nearly four-hour contest in which the Red Sox had twice rallied from two-run deficits — most recently in the eighth inning.

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Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Is Rebuilding Storm-Struck Coastlines Worth The Cost?

The Long Beach High School marching band prepares to march down the Long Beach boardwalk during a ribbon-cutting ceremony Friday.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 12:10 pm

One year ago Tuesday, Hurricane Sandy bore down on the East Coast, devastating shoreline communities from Florida to Maine.

Many of these areas have been rebuilt, including the Long Beach boardwalk, about 30 miles outside New York City. Officials held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new boardwalk Friday.

Ninety percent of the funding for the restoration came from the federal government. The Federal Emergency Management Agency paid $44 million to repair the devastation.

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Movie Interviews
6:00 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Song For Childhood Ghosts 'Carries On' The Sorrow

Singer-songwriter Rita Hosking grew up in a house she says was haunted. She even saw the ghosts of a mother and her son, she says.
Rik Keller Photography

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 12:10 pm

Weekend Edition has been asking you to share your scary stories, the ones that have become family lore. This week, we're sharing those stories and delving into how and why they affect us.

Singer-songwriter Rita Hosking grew up in a house that was haunted. It was known as the Old Erickson Place on Hatchet Mountain in California. In her 2009 album Come Sunrise, she tells the tragic story of the woman and her little boy who lived there years before.

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Sports
3:19 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

NBA's Biggest Rivals Go Head-To-Head For Season Opener

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 12:20 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Tuesday night, two of the NBA's biggest rivals go head-to-head in this season's opener. The Chicago Bulls take on defending champions the Miami Heat. But this year, the Bulls have their star player back. After sitting out for over a year with a knee injury, Chicago's beloved Derrick Rose returns to the court. As NPR's Daniel Hajek reports, Bulls fans are excited about this highly anticipated return.

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Sports
3:19 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Game 3 To Break Tie In World Series Battle

The World Series is tied at one game apiece and moves to St. Louis. The Cardinals host the Boston Red Sox for Game 3 Saturday night. Pitching and opportunistic play have been key for both teams' wins so far.

Economy
3:19 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Value In Sharing The Ratio Of CEO's Pay To Employees'?

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission recently proposed new rules requiring public companies to disclose the ratio of CEO compensation to the average employee's pay. Host Arun Rath talks with Cornell law professor Lynn Stout about how executive pay got to be so high, and what effect the proposed rules may have.

Digital Life
3:19 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Where HealthCare.gov Fell Short Of Other E-Commerce Sites

The federal government's beleaguered health care exchange site, HealthCare.gov, shares little in common with the e-commerce sites consumers use every day. On most e-commerce sites, prices are simple to find. Not so on HealthCare.gov. That may be one of the reasons relatively few visitors to the site have actually enrolled. (This story originally aired on Morning Edition on Oct. 22, 2013.)

Law
3:19 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Lacking Lethal Injection Drugs, States Find Untested Backups

States across the country are facing a shortage of the drugs used for lethal injections. Some are going from a three-drug cocktail to a single drug.
Amber Hunt AP

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 5:32 pm

The U.S. is facing a shortage of a drug widely used for lethal injections. With few options, states are turning to new drugs and compounding pharmacies, rather than overseas companies.

The move is raising safety concerns, and in some cases delaying executions. Other executions are proceeding, however, and advocates are asking whether the use of new drugs violates the inmates' Eighth Amendment protection from cruel and unusual punishment.

A Witness To Lethal Injection

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Code Switch
3:12 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Photographing Puerto Rican New York, With A 'Sympathetic Eye'

Miguel Piñero of the Nuyorican literary movement and poet Sandra Maria Esteves on the train in New York City in 1977.
Bolivar Arellano

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 7:31 pm

In the raging 1970s, New York City was dangerous, broke and at times on fire.

Latinos in the city were taking to the streets, running for office and carving out artistic spaces. "Latino" at the time in New York meant "Puerto Rican."

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

World Series Game 3: Lineups Shift For Games In St. Louis

Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz, a designated hitter in American League ballparks, played first base in St. Louis during the 2004 World Series. He'll do the same for Game 3 of the series Saturday.
Al Bello Getty Images

The all-tied World Series resumes tonight, with Game 3 between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Boston Red Sox. Ahead of the game Saturday, the main storyline centers on the change of venue to St. Louis, where the Red Sox, and their pitchers, will have to adapt to National League rules.

The shift gives the Cardinals something of an edge, at least for now, as NPR's Tom Goldman reports for our Newscast unit:

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It's All Politics
1:39 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

PR Experts: Obamacare Message (Not Just The Site) Needs Fix

A woman looks at the HealthCare.gov insurance exchange site on Oct. 1 in Washington, D.C.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

There's little doubt that the Obama administration would like a health care website do-over.

Since its rollout Oct. 1, Obamacare's online insurance exchange sign-up, critical to success of the health care overhaul, has been a well-documented disaster.

The White House, in addition to managing considerable political fallout, also is dealing with a big, fat public relations problem. Just how does the administration go about winning the trust of the American people after the October Obamacare debacle?

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The Two-Way
1:38 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Marcia Wallace, Longtime 'Simpsons' Cast Member, Dies At 70

Actress Marcia Wallace has died at age 70. She was a fixture on American television for decades, thanks to long-running roles on The Bob Newhart Show and The Simpsons.
Angela Weiss Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 6:46 pm

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The Two-Way
10:32 am
Sat October 26, 2013

U.S. Spying Update: Europe Fumes And Protesters Rally In D.C.

News of U.S. surveillance in Europe has met with distrust and anger; officials are heading to Washington to discuss matters next week. Here, members of an artists' group paint a mural called "Surveillance of the Fittest" on a wall in Cologne, Germany, on Thursday.
Frank Augstein AP

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 7:43 pm

Anger, distrust and possible punishments are the defining themes of Europe's reaction to news that a U.S. spy agency monitored the phone calls of millions of European citizens and some world leaders. The details are the latest to emerge from leaks attributed to former National Security Agency contract worker Edward Snowden.

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Shots - Health News
5:04 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

For Obamacare To Work, It's Not Just About The Numbers

Ashley Hentze (left) gets help signing up for the Affordable Care Act from a volunteer in Florida. The government says that 40 percent of the expected enrollees for 2014 must be young and healthy for health insurance premiums to remain affordable.
Chris O'Meara AP

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 1:38 pm

Relatively few people have enrolled in new health insurance plans since the Affordable Care Act exchanges launched this month. But some health care experts say it's early days yet — and that getting the right proportion of healthy, young new enrollees is just as important as how quickly people sign up.

The Congressional Budget Office projects that 7 million people will buy health insurance for 2014 through the new exchanges, integral to the implementation of the government's new health care law.

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National Security
3:30 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Will Spying Tank U.S.-Europe Relationship?

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 5:55 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

European leaders are meeting in Belgium today and they're fuming over revelations that the U.S. has spied on some of its closest allies. The Guardian newspaper cites documents from the leaker Edward Snowden, saying the U.S. eavesdropped on 35 world leaders.

As NPR's Ari Shapiro says, the White House is now trying hard to blunt the damage from these reports.

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All Tech Considered
3:05 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

A School's iPad Initiative Brings Optimism And Skepticism

Students at Coachella Valley Unified School District use iPads during a lesson. The district's superintendent is promoting the tablet initiative as a way to individualize learning.
Coachella Valley Unified School District

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 5:55 pm

A growing number of school districts across America are trying to weave tablet computers, like the iPad, into the classroom fabric, especially as a tool to help implement the new Common Core state standards for math and reading.

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It's All Politics
12:59 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

'Ready For Hillary' SuperPAC Gains Backing From Soros

George Soros, seen at a forum in Berlin last year, joined a superPAC backing a Hillary Clinton presidential run in 2016.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

It may not officially have a candidate to back quite yet, but for months Ready for Hillary has been revving up for 2016. Now, the superPAC has earned the support of a prominent Democratic donor.

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Shots - Health News
12:18 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Why Engineers Want To Put B Vitamins In 3-D Printers

This riboflavin-rich material can be used to print intricate, microscopic structures in three dimensions.
Courtesy of North Carolina State University

Almost every day it seems there's a new use for 3-D printing.

In medicine, the printers are already making prosthetic hands, hearing aid cases and parts of human ears.

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The Two-Way
11:46 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Administration: A Month Needed To Fix Obamacare Enrollment Site

The HealthCare.gov insurance exchange site shown on Oct. 1, when it opened. Since then, it's been plagued with problems.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 1:37 pm

A subcontractor that built a portion of the HealthCare.gov website that's now working relatively well is being promoted to oversee a thorough revamping of the entire glitch-prone portal, and work will be done by the end of next month, the White House says.

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The Salt
11:26 am
Fri October 25, 2013

San Francisco Kitchen Lends Low-Income Food Entrepreneurs A Hand

Two employees of Alicia's Tamales los Mayas prepare tamales in the La Cocina industrial kitchen. Alicia Villanueva, the owner, and her team produce 3,000 to 5,000 tamales every week to sell in the Bay Area.
Courtesy of La Cocina

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 9:32 am

San Francisco's Mission District is a cultural crossroads for food, where Mexican bodegas and burrito shops meet gourmet bakeries and cutting-edge California cuisine. It's also home to a kitchen where some of the most promising food startups in the region are getting a boost.

When 52-year-old Alicia Villanueva migrated to San Francisco from Mexico in 2001, she began preparing tamales at home to make a living. She found clientele for her authentic, quality food easily, but says that she struggled to grow the business.

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Shots - Health News
10:57 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Why Hiking The Age For Medicare Eligibility Wouldn't Save Much

President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio talk with reporters at the White House after a meeting about the federal budget deficit and economy in Nov. 2012. Some Republicans have proposed raising the Medicare eligibility age to 67.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Americans are living and working longer than ever. And Medicare, the health plan that's supposed to help senior citizens, is facing budget problems sooner rather than later.

By 2023, about 70 million people will get health care paid for by Medicare, and their tab is expected to hit about $1.1 trillion in that year.

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Barbershop
9:27 am
Fri October 25, 2013

'Shop-And-Get-Frisked' When You Spend $350 At Barneys

A young black man is suing high-end retailer Barneys, saying he was arrested after buying a $350 belt. Host Michel Martin checks in with the Barbershop guys for a fresh cut on that story and the rest of the week's news.

Around the Nation
9:27 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Parents Fight To Reopen Case After Questioning Son's Death

Georgia teen Kendrick Johnson was found dead in a wrestling mat at school earlier this year. Authorities ruled it an accident but his parents and neighbors think there was foul play. For more, host Michel Martin speaks with reporter Fred Rosen.

U.S.
1:26 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Newtown Residents Demolish A School, And Violent Memories

In June, people gathered in Newtown, Conn., to remember the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 7:55 am

Demolition has begun at Sandy Hook Elementary School, where a gunman killed 20 students and six adults last December. Bricks will be pulverized, steel melted down and a new school built at the same location.

Allison Hornak attended Sandy Hook Elementary School as a kid. After college, she returned home to Newtown, Conn., and opened an art gallery that's within walking distance of where the mass killing took place.

Hornak says she has a lot of fond memories of Sandy Hook — like a teacher who let her chew gum in class, and the pathways through the school.

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Around the Nation
1:23 am
Fri October 25, 2013

How To Solve A Sky-High Commuting Conundrum

Commuters headed to Oregon Health and Science University use cars, bikes and streetcars to connect with Portland's aerial tram, which whisks them up and over south waterfront neighborhoods.
David P. Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 3:03 pm

This story is part of a series on commuting in America.

Imagine a hospital on top of a mountain. How would doctors and patients get in and out? In Portland, Ore., commuters don't have to drive up a twisty, two-lane road to get there. Instead, they glide up 500 feet in the air in a gleaming silver gondola.

Portland's aerial tram connects the south waterfront down near the river to the Oregon Health and Science University on top of Marquam Hill.

For nurse Sara Hone, it has changed her commute. "I love it. I can't imagine a time without it," she says.

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Shots - Health News
4:50 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

FDA Seeks To Tighten Controls On Hydrocodone Painkillers

Hydrocodone, sold as Vicodin and other brand names, may face tighter restrictions on prescribing and use.
Toby Talbot AP

The Food and Drug Administration Thursday announced that it wants the federal government to impose tough new restrictions on some of the most widely used prescription painkillers.

The FDA said it planned to recommend that Vicodin and other prescription painkillers containing the powerful opioid hydrocodone be reclassified from a "Schedule III" drug to a "Schedule II" drug, which would impose new restrictions on how they are prescribed and used.

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It's All Politics
4:04 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Teen Drinking Party Leaves Md. Attorney General With Headache

In this Instagram photo, Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler (center, in white shirt holding cellphone) is seen at a summer party where underage drinking appears to be taking place.
Via The Baltimore Sun

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 5:12 pm

Doug Gansler is Maryland's top law enforcement official. As the state's attorney general, he's spoken out against the perils of underage drinking.

So, naturally, the posting of an Instagram photo of Gansler in the middle of what appears to be a wild underage drinking party — the attorney general is surrounded by shirtless dancing teenagers and red plastic cups — is proving to be a big political problem.

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U.S.
4:03 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Feds Recast Child Prostitutes As Victims, Not Criminals

The FBI and Department of Justice are working to encourage local law enforcement agencies to view child prostitutes as potential human trafficking victims rather than criminals.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 11:48 am

Across the country, newly formed task forces made up of local, state and federal law enforcement officers are starting to view what was once seen as run-of-the-mill prostitution as possible instances of sex trafficking.

With support and funding from the FBI and the Justice Department, agencies are starting to work together to identify and rescue sex trafficking victims and arrest their pimps.

The new approach is being hailed by victims of trafficking and their advocates as a much-needed paradigm shift — and, the FBI says, is reaping results.

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U.S.
3:06 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Abuse Allegations Leave Twin Cities Archdiocese In Turmoil

Jennifer Haselberger, former top canon lawyer for the archdiocese, found stored files detailing how some priests had histories of sexual abuse. She resigned in April.
Jennifer Simonson Minnesota Public Radio

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 4:25 pm

The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis has been rocked in recent weeks by revelations from a top-level whistle-blower. The former official says church leaders covered up numerous cases of sexual misconduct by priests and even made special payments to pedophiles.

The scandal is notable not only because of the abuse but also because it happened in an archdiocese that claimed to be a national leader in dealing with the issue.

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Around the Nation
2:23 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Detroit Bankruptcy Trial Pits City Against Its Creditors

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 4:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In Detroit today, officials continued making their case before a federal judge that the city is so broke it must declare bankruptcy. Detroit is the largest U.S. municipality ever to seek Chapter 9 protection. And the trial will determine if it's eligible.

As Quinn Klinefelter, of member station WDET, reports that hundreds of Detroit's creditors are trying to block the bankruptcy, arguing that the city did not try hard enough to find the money to avoid it.

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