U.S. News

Politics
2:24 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Mitt Romney, Jeb Bush Could Split Republican Loyalties

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 4:45 pm

Melissa Block speaks with Patrick O'Connor, political reporter for the Wall Street Journal about Mitt Romney telling donors he wants to run again for president in 2016. O'Connor says Romney and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush have the advantage of not being in office and have the ability to raise more money via superPACs before they declare their candidacy.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:16 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

NTSB: D.C. Metro Incident Highlights Need To Improve Transit Safety

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
2:16 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Obama's Policing Task Force Begins With Public Hearing

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
2:16 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

College Football Playoffs A Ratings Win On Television

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:59 am
Tue January 13, 2015

Breaking Up Is Hard To Do, But Science Can Help

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 8:57 am

My boyfriend and I were together for over three years, and then we weren't. The days after the breakup involved lots of crying, and an embarrassing amount of Taylor Swift.

A couple of weeks later, once I was able to will myself out of sweatpants, my friend Eric — who was also coping with a breakup — came over for some IPAs and, of course, Taylor Swift singalongs.

We commiserated about how much life sucked, how lonely we felt and how we were losing sleep. We discussed what was wrong in each of our relationships and what was right.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:17 am
Tue January 13, 2015

Expired Labor Contracts May Exacerbate Rift Between NYPD, Mayor

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 6:01 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more
Back At Base
1:35 am
Tue January 13, 2015

VA Data Show Disparities In Veteran Benefits Spending

George Murray, who served in Vietnam, was able to access his medical benefits from the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs relatively easily while living in Boston. But veterans living in other parts of Massachusetts, like Cape Cod, have more difficulty. Across the U.S., VA data show the unevenness in its benefit spending.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 9:30 am

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This is the first of a three-part series about veteran benefits (Part 2 / Part 3).

Read more
Animals
1:33 am
Tue January 13, 2015

Good News For Bats! Things Are Looking Up For Stemming Disease Spread

This October 2008 photo, provided by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation, shows a brown bat with its nose crusted in fungus.
Ryan von Linden AP

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 6:01 am

The bat disease known as white-nose syndrome has been spreading fast, killing millions of animals. But for the first time, scientists are seeing hopeful signs that some bat colonies are recovering and new breakthroughs could help researchers develop better strategies for helping bats survive.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:19 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

3 Kings Holiday Cake Laced With Synthetic Drugs Makes Dozens Hallucinate

Synthetic drugs, gathered in evidence bags, sit on a white counter.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 1:18 pm

Updated at 3:18 p.m. on Jan. 13.

Last week Southern California Public Radio reported that dozens of people became ill from a Rosca de Reyes, a Three Kings Day bread that is traditional in various Hispanic communities. The sick patrons of Cholula's Bakery in Santa Ana, Calif., and its retail outlets complained of heart palpitations and hallucinations.

Read more
Code Switch
4:29 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

The Story Behind '40 Acres And A Mule'

The Green-Meldrim House in Savannah, Ga., is where Gen. William T. Sherman held meetings with local black leaders, creating the plan later known as "40 acres and a mule."
Sarah McCammon NPR

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 12:30 pm

As the Civil War was winding down 150 years ago, Union leaders gathered a group of black ministers in Savannah, Ga. The goal was to help the thousands of newly freed slaves.

From that meeting came Gen. William T. Sherman's Special Field Order 15. It set aside land along the Southeast coast so that "each family shall have a plot of not more than forty acres of tillable ground."

That plan later became known by a signature phrase: "40 acres and a mule."

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:28 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

Imagining A Future When The Doctor's Office Is In Your Home

Visitors check out wireless blood pressure monitors at the Consumer Electronics Show in Los Angeles.
Joe Klamar AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 8:57 am

Extracting medical care from the health care system is all too often an expensive exercise in frustration. Dr. Eric Topol says your smartphone could make it cheaper, faster, better and safer.

That's the gist of his new book, The Patient Will See You Now. Lots of people are bullish on the future of mobile health to transform health care, but Topol gets extra cred because of his major medical chops: Former head of cardiology at the Cleveland Clinic and present director of the Scripps Translations Science Institute in La Jolla, Calif.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:26 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

An Exhibit Offers A Different Angle On Life In Public Housing

Ephraim Benton, a former resident of Tompkins Houses in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, is now an actor. Benton started a community-based organization called Beyond Influencing Da Hood, which puts on health fairs, film festivals and various free community events in his old housing project. This photo was taken in front of his old building in Tompkins Houses.
Courtesy of Shino Yanagawa

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 4:44 pm

Life in public housing sometimes can be difficult, but it's also a lot like life anywhere — made up mostly of work, school, family and friends. Still, many who don't live in public housing have a negative image of those who do.

Two former residents are trying to change that.

Rico Washington is one of them. The 38-year-old with long dreadlocks and a neatly trimmed beard grew up in Kimberly Gardens public housing apartments in Laurel, Md. When he was younger he was embarrassed about where he lived, he says, and would have co-workers drop him off down the street.

Read more
World
2:37 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

U.S. State Dept.: Weak Government Has Slowed Haiti's Recovery

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 4:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
2:18 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

New York City ID Could Open Up Doors — And Privacy Concerns

Veronica Ramirez holds her 15-month-old son, Lora, as she waits in line Monday to apply for a new municipal identification card at the Bronx Library Center in New York.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 4:41 pm

In New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio made a pitch for a piece of plastic on Monday — a new ID card for New York City residents, regardless of immigration status.

"One piece of plastic, but it's going to open so many doors for our fellow New Yorkers. It's going to make their lives better," de Blasio said.

Read more
Law
2:18 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

In South Carolina, Class Action Lawsuit Pits Foster Kids Against State

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 10:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Politics
2:18 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

Obama: 'If We're Going To Be Connected, Then We Need To Be Protected'

The president spoke about one measure aimed at the data collected in schools, through increasingly popular educational software. "Michelle and I are like parents everywhere," Obama said. "We want to be sure our children are being smart and safe online."
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 4:02 pm

President Obama said Monday he wants the federal government to do more to prevent cyber attacks. He outlined a series of proposals designed to safeguard personal data — steps he'll talk more about in next week's State of the Union address.

The same day, the government itself became a target.

Read more
Law
2:18 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

In Battle Over Church Signs, Is Ariz. Town Being 'A Little Unreasonable'?

Political signs in Gilbert, Ariz. are permitted to be larger and stay up longer than "directional" signs like those pointing residents to local church services.
Bruce Ellefson ADF

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 4:21 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court Monday wrestled with what the constitutional rules should be for local governments seeking to limit sign clutter on public property.

Sign regulation is a thorn in the side of local governments. Too little regulation and they get sued for traffic safety problems, sign clutter, and degraded property values. Too much regulation and they get sued for First Amendment violations. So like Goldilocks, local governments, work hard to get it "just right."

Read more
Politics
2:18 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

Feinstein Proposal Would Lock In Anti-Torture Measures

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 1:09 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Politics
2:18 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

White House Says It Should Have Sent More Senior Official To Unity March

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 4:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
10:14 am
Mon January 12, 2015

What Might Be Missing From MyPlate? Water

The University of California's Nutrition Policy Institute has proposed that MyPlate include an icon for water.
UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Sometime in the next few weeks, we'll be hearing from the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. The panel of nutrition experts is tasked with reviewing the latest science on nutrition and medicine and making recommendations on how to update the next version of the federal government's guidance on eating.

Read more
Shots - Health News
8:46 am
Mon January 12, 2015

Your Online Avatar May Reveal More About You Than You'd Think

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 8:49 am

My Nintendo Wii character, my Mii, looks a lot like me. She has the same haircut, the same skin tone and even the same eyebrow shape. And while my Mii plays tennis slightly better than I do, I designed her to be a real, virtual me (albeit with balls for hands).

But it turns out I might not have needed to mimic my appearance to let people know what I'm like.

Read more
NPR Ed
5:28 am
Mon January 12, 2015

Meet The Classroom Of The Future

A blended learning classroom at David Boody Jr. High School in New York City.
Courtesy of New Classrooms

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 11:17 am

The classroom of the future probably won't be led by a robot with arms and legs, but it may be guided by a digital brain.

It may look like this: one room, about the size of a basketball court; more than 100 students, all plugged into a laptop; and 15 teachers and teaching assistants.

This isn't just the future, it's the sixth grade math class at David Boody Jr. High School in Brooklyn, near Coney Island. Beneath all the human buzz, something other than humans is running the show: algorithms.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:04 am
Mon January 12, 2015

White House: We Should Have Sent 'Higher-Profile' Official To Paris

World leaders, including, from the left, Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Mali's Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, France's Francois Hollande, Germany's Angela Merkel, EU President Donald Tusk and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas march in Paris on Sunday to honor the victims of three days of bloodshed. A White House spokesman acknowledged "we should have sent someone with a higher profile."
Philippe Wojazer AP

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 12:45 pm

Update at 1:40 p.m. ET. White House Backs Down:

"We should have sent someone with a higher profile," White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said during a briefing Monday.

The admission came a day after criticism surfaced over the fact that the United States was not represented by a high-ranking official at a unity rally in Paris. The British, German, Israeli and Palestinian leaders all had been present.

Earnest said, however, that President Obama would have liked to have been present, but the security situation would have been impossible.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:59 am
Mon January 12, 2015

Demonstrators In Birmingham, Ala., Rally In Support Of Police

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 4:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more
The Salt
1:26 am
Mon January 12, 2015

Iowa's Largest City Sues Over Farm Fertilizer Runoff In Rivers

The city of Des Moines, Iowa, sits on the Raccoon and Des Moines rivers. The city's water works says it will sue three neighboring counties for high nitrate levels in these waterways.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 5:09 pm

Des Moines, Iowa, is confronting the farms that surround it over pollution in two rivers that supply the city with drinking water. Des Moines Water Works says it will sue three neighboring counties for high nitrate levels in the Raccoon and Des Moines rivers. It's a novel attempt to control fertilizer runoff from farms, which has been largely unregulated.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:22 am
Mon January 12, 2015

The Doctor Who Championed Hand-Washing And Briefly Saved Lives

Semmelweis considered scientific inquiry part of his mission as a physician.
De Agostini Picture Library Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 8:49 am

This is the story of a man whose ideas could have saved a lot of lives and spared countless numbers of women and newborns' feverish and agonizing deaths.

You'll notice I said "could have."

The year was 1846, and our would-be hero was a Hungarian doctor named Ignaz Semmelweis.

Read more
National Security
3:11 pm
Sun January 11, 2015

How The CIA Almost Lost A Key Informant

Originally published on Sun January 11, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Dexter Filkins of The New Yorker recently went through what we did learn about the CIA's interrogation of one of those defendants - the self proclaimed mastermind of the 9-11 attack, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed. Dexter Filkins, welcome to the program.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:11 pm
Sun January 11, 2015

States And Businesses Continue Playing The Keystone XL Waiting Game

Originally published on Sun January 11, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

In 2012, this program traveled to Oklahoma and Nebraska and talked to folks about the Keystone XL pipeline.

Read more
National Security
3:11 pm
Sun January 11, 2015

Will Obama Be Able To Keep His Promise Of Closing Guantanamo Bay?

Originally published on Sun January 11, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Code Switch
10:32 am
Sun January 11, 2015

'Selma' Stirs Powerful Memories In Its Namesake Town

Selma residents, many with firsthand connections to the city's civil rights movement, file into the Walton Theater for a free screening of Selma.
Andrew Yeager NPR

It's a half-hour until showtime in Selma, Ala., and the majority of the auditorium seats are already taken.

Paramount Pictures is offering free screenings of Selma, the film depicting the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery marches which led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act. In the movie's namesake town, the audience is excited.

In the front row, in the far left seat, is George Sallie, 85. He's black, grew up near Selma and was drafted as young man.

"Went to Korea fighting for someone else's freedom, and really I didn't have freedom myself," Sallie says.

Read more

Pages