U.S. News

NPR History Dept.
7:03 am
Fri March 13, 2015

A King Speech You've Never Heard — Plus, Your Chance To Do Archive Sleuthing

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1965.
AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 7:54 am

Historically speaking, I need your help.

Davis Houck, a communications professor at Florida State University, recently pointed me toward a little-explored archive at Stanford University called Project South.

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Around the Nation
3:37 am
Fri March 13, 2015

In Ferguson, The Shooting Of 2 Officers Stirs A Long-Simmering Anxiety

Demonstrators hold a prayer service near the Ferguson police station on Thursday. Prayers were said for both activists and the two police officers who had been shot earlier in the day.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 9:18 am

For members of the Ferguson, Mo., community, the shooting of two police officers Thursday morning has ratcheted up an anxiety that's already long been simmering. As a manhunt continues Friday, one need only visit the blocks around the Ferguson Police Department to get a sense of that tension.

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NPR Story
3:12 am
Fri March 13, 2015

More Indians Who Moved To The U.S. Decide To Return Home

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 5:56 am

Copyright 2015 Puget Sound Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.kuow.org.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
6:58 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Architect Michael Graves Dies At 80

Architect and designer Michael Graves poses at his studio in Princeton, N.J., in 2003. He died Thursday at age 80.
Daniel Hulshizer AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 12:34 pm

Michael Graves, one of the country's most prominent architects, has died at his home in Princeton, N.J., of natural causes, his firm, Michael Graves Architecture & Design, said in statement. He was 80.

NPR's Neda Ulaby tells our Newscast unit that Graves "was celebrated for designing everything from grand hotels to teapots."

Here's how Neda describes those iconic teapots: "The Michael Graves teapot is sleek and dome-like, with a circle for a handle. Like so much of his work, it's designed to be easy to use — and beautiful."

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The Two-Way
6:48 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Texas Ends Contract With Group That Has Run Alamo For More Than A Century

Members of the San Antonio Living History Association fire a volley as they take part in a Dawn at the Alamo memorial service at Alamo Plaza in San Antonio on March 6, 2006. Texas is taking back the landmark from the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, which has run the Alamo for more than 100 years.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 2:17 pm

Texas is ending its contract with the Daughters of the Republic of Texas to run the Alamo. The San Antonio Express-News is reporting that the move ends the organization's more than 100-year-long management of the landmark.

The change will help "create a bigger, brighter future for this Texas shrine," Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush said in a joint statement with the DRT.

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It's All Politics
4:40 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

How The Iran Letter Is Playing In The 2016 Campaign

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker contends that the next president might not be bound by a nuclear deal President Obama strikes with Iran.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 7:09 pm

Forty-seven Senate Republicans signed a letter to Tehran's leaders Monday questioning the authority of any agreement Iran might sign with President Obama that is not ratified by Congress. And it's becoming an issue in the 2016 presidential campaign with potential Republican candidates signing onto the letter.

Tom Cotton, the freshman Arkansas senator behind the letter, even tweeted a Farsi translation directly to the Iranian president and foreign minister.

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All Tech Considered
4:14 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Silicon Prairie: Tech Startups Find A Welcoming Home In The Midwest

Lincoln, Neb., is home to several startups, which use the city's low cost of living and high quality of life to attract workers.
Nicolas Henderson Flickr

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 5:50 am

Some startup entrepreneurs are leaving the high tech hot spots of San Francisco, New York and the Silicon Valley for greener pastures in a place that actually has greener pastures: Lincoln, Neb.

In fact, one of the secrets to the economic success of Lincoln, a city with one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country, is a surprisingly strong tech startup community that is part of what some in the region are calling the Silicon Prairie.

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The Salt
4:14 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

A Craft Beer Tax Battle Is Brewing On Capitol Hill

Brewers pay a federal tax on each barrel of beer they produce. Two proposals on Capitol Hill would lower that tax for small brewers, but not everyone's on board.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 5:49 am

Congressman Patrick McHenry is a man who knows his beer. The refrigerator in his Capitol Hill office is filled to the brim with it. The Republican's district includes the city of Asheville, N.C., which claims it has more breweries per capita than any other U.S. city.

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Business
4:06 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Obama, Unions On Opposite Sides Of The (Fast) Track For Trade Deals

Shipping containers at the Port of Los Angeles. Unions are stepping up their efforts to thwart White House plans for passing foreign trade deals on a "fast track" through Congress.
Nick Ut AP

This week, labor leaders made sure President Obama knows that when it comes to foreign trade, they are living on opposite sides of the track — the "fast track," that is.

That's a term describing a president's broad power to negotiate a trade agreement — and then put the final package on a "fast track" through Congress. Lawmakers can give it a yes-or-no vote, but can't amend or filibuster the deal.

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The Two-Way
3:36 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

U.S. Attorney General Holder Denounces Police Shootings In Missouri

Attorney General Eric Holder denounces the shootings of Ferguson, Mo., officers and announces six pilot cities for a community trust and justice initiative.
Andrew Harnik AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 7:38 am

Attorney General Eric Holder has condemned the unknown assailant who shot two police officers overnight in Ferguson, Mo., as a "punk who was trying to sow discord" and said he hoped the "disgusting and cowardly attack" would not unravel the progress the community is making to restore trust in the police and the municipal courts there.

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Around the Nation
2:51 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Justice Department Report Sparks Resignations Of Key Ferguson Officials

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 4:43 pm

After a Justice Department report ridiculed the city's government, a number of key Ferguson, Mo., officials resigned, including the powerful city manager and the police chief. But it may take more than shuffling personnel to heal the wounded city.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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U.S.
2:49 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

In Idaho School District, Preschool At Risk Without Federal Funds

Idaho preschool teacher Mary Allen listens to one of her students during their afternoon snack time. The state doesn't have public preschool, so programs are paid for through a hodgepodge of funding sources.
Emilie Ritter Saunders KBSX

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 4:43 pm

The Basin School District in rural south-central Idaho has something most districts in the state don't: preschool. But now that's at risk because of federal funding cuts.

It's not alone: Sparsely populated school districts and counties covered in federal forest lands will have less money this year — $250 million less — because Congress allowed the Secure Rural Schools Act to expire.

Since Idaho doesn't have public preschool, schools that want to offer it have to find creative ways to pay for the program — state money isn't an option.

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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Powdered Alcohol Faces Hurdles After Regulatory Approval

The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau approved this week powdered version of Palcohol's cosmopolitan, margarita, rum and vodka.
Palcohol

Two days after a federal regulator approved powdered alcohol, there's already an attempt to ban it.

Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., said today he is introducing legislation in the Senate to make the production, sale and possession of Palcohol illegal.

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Around the Nation
2:42 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Search Continues For Perpetrators In Ferguson Police Shootings

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 4:43 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It's All Politics
2:42 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Hillary Clinton's Privacy Problem

In April 1994, Hillary Clinton took questions from reporters for more than an hour as first lady. By that point, she had a reputation for not being particularly transparent and for not spending enough time addressing the national media.
Doug Mills AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 2:21 pm

Controversy swirled. The press had questions, a lot of them. And so, finally, Hillary Clinton decided to address reporters.

"Well let me thank all of you for coming," she said, sitting on a low platform in the State Dining Room.

It was April 1994. The first lady wore pale pink and took questions for more than an hour about the Whitewater investigation, cattle futures, the suicide of White House Deputy Counsel Vince Foster and which documents may have been removed from his office. Finally, there was the question of why she had let the scandals fester so long.

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Television
2:34 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

'Breaking Bad' Homeowner Tired Of Pizzas On The Roof

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 4:43 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And now some pizza to go with all that craft beer.

FRAN PADILLA: We've had pizzas on our roof. We've had pizzas on our driveway; pizzas until we're sick of looking at pizzas.

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Around the Nation
2:34 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Iraqi Refugee Death Puts Spotlight On Crime-Ridden Dallas Neighborhood

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 4:43 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Race
2:34 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Southern Christian Leadership Conference President Marches For Selma Anniversary

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 4:43 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Shots - Health News
10:05 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Before The Gas Is Passed, Researchers Aim To Measure It In The Gut

Feces contain digested food residue and a wide variety of microorganisms, mostly bacteria, that are adapted to life in the intestines. The gases the microbes produce could help doctors and scientists track and understand changes related to health.
Scimat Scimat Photo Researchers/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 6:40 am

Electrical engineer Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh calls the stinking mixture puddled in jars inside his laboratory "fecal inocula."

The jars of fresh poop are instrumental to his research at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia to develop ways to scientifically analyze people's farts, something that the researchers believe could help them more easily track the activity of the human gut microbiome.

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Ditching The Common Core Brings A Big Test For Indiana

Indiana squeezed the normal life cycle of a test—pilot, field, real—into one, massive exam that clocked in at 12 hours.
LA Johnson/NPR

Every eldest child knows all too well: Going first can be tough.

There's no one to help you pick the good teachers at school or give you advice on how to tell Mom and Dad about that fender bender.

Right now, Indiana is the firstborn, feeling its way through some thorny — and consequential — education decisions with little precedent to lean on.

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Around the Nation
3:26 am
Thu March 12, 2015

2 Officers Shot Outside Ferguson Police Station

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 7:44 am

The officers were shot shortly after midnight Thursday, according to a county police spokesman. The shots were fired as protesters had gathered following the resignation of the city's police chief. The county spokesman says the officers sustained serious, but not life-threatening, injuries.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
3:04 am
Thu March 12, 2015

When Life Overwhelms, This Group Lends A Healthy Hand

Ella Barnes-Williams visits the thrift shop associated with Martha's Table, a nonprofit social services organization in Washington, D.C.
Anders Kelto/NPR

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 12:03 pm

Ella Barnes-Williams is dealing with a lot right now.

For starters, her government-subsidized house in Northeast Washington, D.C., leaks when it rains. She points at a big brown splotch on the ceiling.

"It's like mold, mold, mold all over," she says. "I've got to clean that now 'cause that just came back."

Barnes-Williams is 54 and lives with her 30-year-old daughter and three young grandchildren. All three grandkids have severe asthma, which makes the mold a serious problem. And she and her daughter are diabetic.

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NPR Ed
3:04 am
Thu March 12, 2015

A Child Of Slavery Who Taught A Generation

Anna Julia Cooper was the fourth African-American woman in the U.S. to earn a doctoral degree.
Scurlock Studios Smithsonian

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 11:15 am

Some great teachers change the life of a student, maybe several. Anna Julia Cooper changed America.

Cooper was one of the first black women in the country to earn a Ph.D. Before that, she headed the first public high school for black students in the District of Columbia — Washington Colored High School. It later became known as the M Street School and was eventually renamed for poet Paul Laurence Dunbar.

Dunbar was a citadel of learning in segregated Washington, a center for rigorous study and no-holds-barred achievement. Its graduates over the years include:

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Around the Nation
8:42 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Police Chief Is Latest Ferguson, Mo., Official To Resign

An assistant chief will replace Tom Jackson; a Justice Department probe following the shooting death of Michael Brown had found serious problems in how the department operated.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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The Two-Way
5:50 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Filmmaker Richard Glatzer, Who Wrote And Directed 'Still Alice,' Dies At 63

Still Alice directors Richard Glatzer (left) and Wash Westmoreland. Glatzer has died at age 63 after battling ALS.
Ina Jaffe NPR

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 6:20 pm

Filmmaker Richard Glatzer, the co-writer and co-director of Still Alice, died Tuesday in Los Angeles after a battle with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 63.

On the night actress Julianne Moore won an Oscar for her work in the film about a woman with Alzheimer's, Glatzer watched from his hospital room.

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Code Switch
5:28 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Racial Tension Draws Parallels, But Madison Is No Ferguson

Madison Mayor Paul Soglin addresses a crowd of protesters on Martin Luther King Boulevard in Madison, Wis., during a protest of the shooting death of Tony Robinson.
Andy Manis AP

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 9:03 pm

Five days after a white police officer shot and killed 19-year-old Tony Robinson, an unarmed black man, in Madison, Wis., protesters are staging large rallies to demand that charges be filed. Meanwhile, officers are rallying at the Wisconsin State Capitol on behalf of the city's police.

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The Two-Way
4:41 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Report: Secret Service Agents Drove Car Into White House Barricades After Drinking

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 11:33 am

Updated at 8:44 p.m. ET

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Shots - Health News
4:03 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Results Of Many Clinical Trials Not Being Reported

Glenn Lightner in 2012 at age 13. His father searched clinicaltrials.gov for years, to no avail, hoping to find a promising experimental cancer treatment that might save his son's life.
Courtesy of Lawrence Lightner

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 11:01 am

Many scientists are failing to live up to a 2007 law that requires them to report the results of their clinical trials to a public website, according to a study in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine.

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Shots - Health News
4:03 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Would A Pill To Protect Teens From HIV Make Them Feel Invincible?

Truvada can dramatically reduce the risk of HIV infection when taken as a preventative medicine — if taken every day. Studies are underway to determine if young people are likely to take the pill consistently.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 9:08 am

Leon Richardson is 18 years old and tall, charismatic and thoughtful about his sexual health.

He understands that as a young, gay black man, he is in the demographic with the highest rate of HIV infections in the country. But when Richardson learned that he could be part of an HIV prevention pill research study for young people, he was skeptical.

"I was scared. I had to really think about it, 'What is this drug going to do to me?' " he says.

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The Salt
3:57 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Why Some Schools Serve Local Food And Others Can't (Or Won't)

A lunch served by the Yarmouth, Maine, School Department on Sept. 26, 2014, featured Sloppy Joe's made with Maine beef and local beets, carrots, apples and potato salad. More than 80 percent of Maine schools said they served local foods in a survey conducted by the USDA.
U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 2:23 pm

For many years, if a public school district wanted to serve students apples or milk from local farmers, it could face all kinds of hurdles. Schools were locked into strict contracts with distributors, few of whom saw any reason to start bringing in local products. Those contracts also often precluded schools from working directly with local farmers.

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