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Sunday Sports

Jan 1, 2017

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Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF JOHN CAMERON SONG, "THE COMPETITIORS")

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Much has been said about the physical and psychological injuries of war, like traumatic brain injury or post-traumatic stress disorder. But what we talk about less is how these conditions affect the sexual relationships of service members after they return from combat.

In September, reproductive endocrinologist John Zhang and his team at the New Hope Fertility Center in New York City captured the world's attention when they announced the birth of a child to a mother carrying a fatal genetic defect.

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MICHEL MARTIN, BYLINE: It's New Year's Eve, the last day of the year, so we thought we'd spend this hour reflecting on the year that was by checking back in with some of the people we spoke with throughout the year to hear their reflections and their hopes for the coming year.

As 2016 comes to a close, we wanted to take the time to hear from a few people whose words and actions influenced the nation this year.

One such person is actor and activist Jesse Williams. Many may know him as Jackson Avery, one of the many good-looking doctors on Shonda Rhimes' long running medical drama Grey's Anatomy.

In addition to starring in Grey's Anatomy, Jesse Williams dabbles in a lot of things: He's launched two mobile apps, hosts a basketball podcast and is in the midst of filing a remake of the 1990 thriller Jacob's Ladder.

The United Nations Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution Saturday in support of the efforts by Russia and Turkey to end the violence in Syria and "jump-start" a political process.

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Updated at 6:10 p.m. ET Saturday with comment from Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas

From his office in the Palestinian city of Bethlehem, Jad Isaac has a close-up view of the big debate that has erupted over Israeli settlements.

He's director of The Applied Research Institute Jerusalem, a Palestinian organization for sustainable development, and outside his window is a hill covered in rows of homes: the Jewish settlement of Har Homa.

I did not want to join yoga class. I hated those soft-spoken, beatific instructors. I worried that the people in the class could fold up like origami and I'd fold up like a bread stick. I understood the need for stretchy clothes but not for total anatomical disclosure. But my hip joints hurt and so did my shoulders, and my upper back hurt even more than my lower back and my brain would. not. shut. up. I asked my doctor about medication and he said he didn't like the side effects and was pretty sure I wouldn't, either.

Here's a quick roundup of some of the mini-moments you may have missed on this week's Morning Edition.

Clean that screen

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I think I've waited all year to say it's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

I was standing by the airport exit, debating whether to get a snack, when a young man with a round face approached me.

I focused hard to decipher his words. In a thick accent, he asked me to help him find his suitcase.

As we walked to baggage claim, I learned his name: Edward Murinzi. This was his very first plane trip. A refugee from the Democratic Republic of Congo, he'd just arrived to begin his American life.

A version of this story previously ran as part of The American Homefront Project, a national reporting collaboration from member stations WUNC, KUOW and KPCC.

When his convoy was attacked with an improvised explosive device in Iraq in 2007, Army Sgt. Jeff Lynch was seriously wounded. He suffered a traumatic brain injury, was hospitalized for months, and underwent more than a hundred surgeries.

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With a president-elect who has publicly supported the debunked claim that vaccines cause autism, suggested that climate change is a hoax dreamed up by the Chinese, and appointed to his Cabinet a retired neurosurgeon who doesn't buy the theory of evolution, things might look grim for science.

Russia was ordered to vacate two compounds it owns in Maryland and New York, as part of the sanctions imposed Thursday by the White House to punish Russia for its meddling in last month's U.S. presidential election.

A North Carolina judge is temporarily blocking a law that would have limited the power of the state's incoming governor. Democratic Gov.-elect Roy Cooper defeated incumbent Republican Pat McCrory in November in a tight race.

British media reports citing an anonymous spokesperson say that Prime Minister Theresa May is harshly criticizing outgoing Secretary of State John Kerry for his speech condemning Israeli settlements in the West Bank.

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The Jewish community in Whitefish, Mont., has become the target of online harassment by neo-Nazis after Sherry Spencer, the mother of emerging white nationalist leader Richard Spencer, wrote online about being asked to sell her downtown properties and donate the profits to the Montana Human Rights Network.

The Colorado River is like a giant bank account for seven different states. Now it's running short.

For decades, the river has fed growing cities from Denver to Los Angeles. A lot of the produce in supermarkets across the country was grown with Colorado River water. But with climate change, and severe drought, the river is reaching a crisis point, and communities at each end of it are reacting very differently.

In November, the typically straitlaced Office of Government Ethics surprised observers with a series of tweets mimicking Donald Trump's bombastic style, exclamation points and all: "Brilliant! Divestiture is good for you, good for America!"

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Professor Kimberly Marten of Barnard College is a scholar of U.S.-Russia relations, and she joins us now. Welcome to the program once again.

KIMBERLY MARTEN: Thank you.

SIEGEL: What effect do you expect these sanctions would have on Russia?

In Puerto Rico, A Woman Infected With Zika Prays For A Healthy Baby

Dec 30, 2016

Before the virus overwhelmed Puerto Rico, Zika already lurked in Keishla Mojica's home in Caguas.

First her partner, John Rodríguez, 23, became infected. His face swelled and a red, itchy rash covered his body. Doctors at the time diagnosed it as an allergy.

Two months later, Mojica, 23, had the same symptoms. Medics administered shots of Benadryl to soothe the rash and inflammation. She didn't give it much more thought.

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