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People across the country joined protests and held vigils late this week, following two highly publicized police shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota. As those incidents dominated headlines and social media, a sniper targeted law enforcement at a peaceful protest in Dallas, killing five police officers and shocking the nation.

Barbershop: What It's Like In The Uniform

Jul 9, 2016
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Looking At How Police Are Trained

Jul 9, 2016
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A Look At Policing In The United States

Jul 9, 2016
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Investigators say a young African-American man named Micah Xavier Johnson was the sole attacker in Dallas Thursday night, when he shot 12 police officers, killing five. The attack came at the end of an otherwise peaceful march protesting police shootings.

Sydney Schanberg, the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times correspondent best known for his raw, gripping coverage of Cambodia's fall to the Khmer Rouge, has died at 82.

His longtime friend Charles Kaiser confirmed his death to NPR. Schanberg had suffered a heart a heart attack last Tuesday, Kaiser said, and died early Saturday.

About a hundred miles north of Miami on the Atlantic Coast, the town of Stuart is a picturesque waterfront community — with homes, restaurants and parks overlooking the St. Lucie Estuary. But in many areas now, when you approach the water, the first thing you notice is the smell.

"There's no way to describe it," says John Skinner, a boat salesman in Stuart.

But he still tries. "I would say hundreds of dead animals that have been baking in the sun for weeks."

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When Violence Is A Constant, How Do We Deal?

Jul 9, 2016

I think I saw the moment Philando Castile died this week.

It was on the video his girlfriend made after he was shot by a police officer. He was still alive when the video began. His girlfriend talking into the camera while blood seeped across his chest. Her 4-year-old daughter in the back seat, trying to reassure her mother everything would be alright. The police officer still at the window of the car, a gun in his hand. And then Castile died.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

The story is a familiar one: the saga of a loving parent's quest to save a child. This time it's about the mother of a boy with autism. The mother scours the medical literature in search of any kind of treatment, however far-fetched and experimental. She finds one that seems promising, something involving magnetic fields, and moves mountains to get it for her son as part of a research protocol.

Four guys walk into a diner.

One, in a plaid shirt, sells golf equipment online. His name is Chris Regan. Two — Eric Schiffhauer and Jordan Wagner — are midway through their Ph.D.'s at Johns Hopkins University.

And the other, Jebree Christian, is a recent high school graduate from West Baltimore. His arms are covered in tattoos, most of them commemorating someone he has lost.

Each Sunday, they gather here at Jimmy's on Baltimore's harbor.

After sniper fire struck 12 police officers at a rally in downtown Dallas, killing five, police cornered a single suspect in a parking garage. After a prolonged exchange of gunfire and a five-hour-long standoff, police made what experts say was an unprecedented decision: to send in a police robot, jury-rigged with a bomb.

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While in Warsaw, Poland, for the NATO summit, President Obama condemned the shootings that killed five police officers and left seven injured in Dallas. He said there was no justification for such a "vicious, calculated and despicable attack on law enforcement" and that it's a reminder "of the sacrifices that they make for us."

U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown, D-Fla., and her chief of staff, Elias "Ronnie" Simmons, are facing multiple counts of fraud and other charges related to an educational charity tied to the congresswoman, according to a federal indictment.

Federal prosecutors allege Brown, 69, and Simmons, 50, misled donors while soliciting donations for One Door for Education, under the guise of funding scholarships for minority students, raising more than $800,000.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

We're still waiting for the full picture of what happened in Dallas, Texas — and in Baton Rouge, La., and in Falcon Ridge, Minn., for that matter — to emerge. But what we know so far is this: In Dallas on Thursday night, hundreds of people gathered for what had been a peaceful protest over the deaths of Philando Castile in Minnesota and Alton Sterling in Louisiana, two black men who were killed by police officers earlier in the week.

The morning after a gunman targeted and killed five law enforcement officers, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings called it "ironic" that his city was the target of the worst police loss-of-life since the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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