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Around the Nation
2:32 pm
Fri May 15, 2015

Critics Question Why Amtrak Took So Long To Install Positive Train Control

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 4:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Law
2:31 pm
Fri May 15, 2015

Jury Sentences Boston Marathon Bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev To Death

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 4:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
2:31 pm
Fri May 15, 2015

Correction: Facebook News Partnerships, Amtrak Derailment

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 4:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
3:07 am
Fri May 15, 2015

Why Did Amtrak Train Accelerate Into A Curve Before Derailing?

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 12:13 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
6:02 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Stephanopoulos Apologizes For Not Disclosing Donations To Clinton Foundation

ABC news anchor George Stephanopoulos is apologizing for failing to disclose $75,000 in donations over a three-year period to the Clinton Foundation.

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The Salt
3:53 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

From Scornin' It To Lovin' It: McDonald's Tests Out Kale On Its Menu

Kale is not only loaded with nutrients, but it's become a emblem of a healthy lifestyle that's increasingly appealing to Americans ready to move away from processed, high-calorie food.
Peet Sneekes/Flickr

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 4:31 pm

Just a few months ago McDonald's was showing no love for kale.

In a TV ad promoting the beefiness of the Big Mac, the chain poked fun at the leafy green and other vegetarian fare: "You can't get juiciness like this from soy or quinoa," a low voice quips as the camera focuses on a juicy burger. "Nor will it ever be kale."

But the chain is now showing it some affection. McDonald's has announced that it's testing a new breakfast bowl that blends kale and spinach with turkey sausage and egg whites. McDonald's spokeswoman Lisa McComb says the bowls are "freshly prepared."

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It's All Politics
3:52 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

After Baltimore And Ferguson, Major Momentum For Criminal Justice System Reform

Demonstrators participated in a March2Justice for criminal justice reform legislation outside the Capitol in April. Lawmakers who are working to on fixes to the justice system say recent unrest is pushing them to act.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 16, 2015 5:46 pm

Lawmakers working on fixes to the justice system say that unrest in places like Ferguson, Mo., and Baltimore is pushing them to act.

"The whole idea of a young man dying in police custody, the confrontations with police, the looting and burning of innocent minority owned businesses," Texas Republican Sen. John Cornyn said on the Senate floor this month. "The question arises, what can we do?"

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The Two-Way
3:49 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Calif. Moves Closer To Banning Vaccine 'Personal Belief' Exemptions

A photo from April shows protesters in Sacramento, Calif., rallying against a bill that would require all school-age children to be vaccinated. The state Senate just passed the measure.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

California's state Senate has passed a bill to eliminate "personal belief exemptions" that currently allow parents to opt out of having their school-age children vaccinated.

SB 277, sponsored by Democratic Sens. Richard Pan of Sacramento and Ben Allen of Santa Monica, passed 25 to 10 and now advances to the Assembly.

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NPR Ed
3:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

After Suicides, MIT Works To Relieve Student Pressure

Professors are now particularly attuned to the issue of "impostor syndrome" — a feeling students can have that they must have gotten into MIT by mistake.
Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 1:32 pm

On a sunny spring day at MIT in Cambridge, Mass., students line up at a table grabbing ice cream sundaes, milk and cookies, and, if they're interested, a hug from MIT parents including Sonal Patel.

"Yes!" Patel says, "giving away ice cream and now hugs."

"Oh, I want a hug," a student says, "that will be good."

The event — billed as "Stress Less Day" — is sponsored by the student mental health awareness group Active Minds. Volunteers are handing out fliers listing mental health facts and campus resources.

Sophomore Matt Ossa gets his ice cream and rushes on.

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Parallels
3:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

The Man Who Keeps Tabs On U.S. Money Spent In Afghanistan

John Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, testifies on Capitol Hill last June. Sopko says the Afghans are still having trouble managing the money the U.S. sends to the country. The U.S. has spent $110 billion on Afghanistan's reconstruction since 2002.
Charles Dharapak ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 12:46 pm

John Sopko, whose job is to watch over U.S. government spending in Afghanistan, says it's not his job to be a cheerleader — it's to speak truth to power.

"I am often the bringer of bad news to people. Or at least that's what some people think," he says.

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Business
3:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Why Some Detroit Residents Claim To Live Someplace Else

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan (left) has proposed a $275,000 cap on auto-related medical coverage in order to make auto insurance more affordable.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 4:57 pm

How much does auto insurance cost in Detroit?

For an estimated 50 to 60 percent of Detroit drivers, it's actually a very good deal: "They're paying nothing, because they don't buy insurance," says Wayne Miller, an adjunct professor at Wayne State University Law School in Detroit.

He studies insurance and says Detroiters, who pay some of the highest insurance rates in the nation, have found other ways to game the system.

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Politics
3:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

President Obama Meets With Arab Allies At Camp David

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 7:35 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Media
3:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

George Stephanopoulos Discloses Donations To Clinton Foundation

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 9:28 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It's All Politics
3:14 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Drone-Like Device Puts White House On Lockdown

This small unmanned aerial vehicle was spotted flying near the White House.
US Secret Service

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 4:54 pm

It's red and black and not much larger than a brick.

But the unmanned flying device, that looked more like a toy than a drone, was a big enough problem to put the White House, executive mansion and surrounding area on lock down for about an hour while it was checked out.

The small "unmanned aerial vehicle" was spotted flying 100 feet above Lafayette Park at lunchtime Thursday afternoon, according to the U.S. Secret Service. The park is right across the street from the White House.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Tom Brady Appeals 'Deflategate' Suspension

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady is appealing his four-game suspension in connection with the "deflategate" scandal.

The NFL Players Association filed the appeal today on Brady's saying:

"Given the NFL's history of inconsistency and arbitrary decisions in disciplinary matters, it is only fair that a neutral arbitrator hear this appeal.

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Race
1:16 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos

A helicopter flies over a section of Baltimore affected by riots. Richard Rothstein writes that recent unrest in Baltimore is the legacy of a century of federal, state and local policies designed to "quarantine Baltimore's black population in isolated slums."
Patrick Smith Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 11:25 am

Fifty years after the repeal of Jim Crow, many African-Americans still live in segregated ghettos in the country's metropolitan areas. Richard Rothstein, a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute, has spent years studying the history of residential segregation in America.

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NPR History Dept.
11:03 am
Thu May 14, 2015

The Curious World Of Baseball Re-Enactors

The Dirigo Vintage Base Ball Club in Maine.
Courtesy of Matt Muise

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 11:38 am

Vintage base ball players — sort of like Civil War re-enactors who wield wooden bats instead of muskets — move among us. They glory in the past times of America's pastime.

Think: When Johnny comes sliding home.

Dressed in old uniforms, teams play each other using 19th century rules. Sometimes they don't wear gloves. Sometimes they pitch underhand. They spell "base ball" as two words. They call each other "ballists."

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Shots - Health News
10:50 am
Thu May 14, 2015

A Fungus Causes More Unexpected Illnesses In Montana

Cough? Check. Fever? Check. But bet you didn't think that this common fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum, could be making you sick.
Science Source

If you go to the doctor with a cough and fever, odds are you're not thinking you could have an unusual fungal infection — and neither is the doctor.

That's why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants to get the word out that they found more people sick with histoplasmosis in Montana and Idaho.

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The Two-Way
8:13 am
Thu May 14, 2015

Harry Shearer, Voice Of Ned Flanders And Mr. Burns, Will Leave 'The Simpsons'

Actor and writer Harry Shearer says he's leaving the cast of The Simpsons, the show he has been a part of since it first aired in 1989.
Dave J Hogan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 1:00 pm

After 26 seasons of giving life to nincompoops, do-gooders, and even God, actor Harry Shearer has announced he'll be leaving The Simpsons. A stalwart of the show, Shearer has voiced central characters such as Ned Flanders, Mr. Burns, Reverend Lovejoy and Principal Seymour Skinner.

In a tweet sent in the wee hours of Thursday, Shearer said he was leaving "because I wanted what we've always had: the freedom to do other work."

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NPR Ed
6:27 am
Thu May 14, 2015

Vindication For Fidgeters: Movement May Help Students With ADHD Concentrate

Allowing kids with ADHD to move around in class may help them collect their thoughts.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 7:46 am

Are you a pen-clicker? A hair-twirler? A knee-bouncer? Did you ever get in trouble for fidgeting in class? Don't hang your head in shame. All that movement may be helping you think.

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The Two-Way
4:50 am
Thu May 14, 2015

Positive Train Control: The Tech That Could've Prevented Amtrak Derailment

Emergency personnel walk near the scene of a deadly train wreck on Wednesday in Philadelphia.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 12:31 pm

One key safety feature was missing from the stretch of track where an Amtrak passenger train going more than 100 mph derailed and killed seven people.

Investigators say that if positive train control had been installed on that stretch, the technology could have automatically slowed the train and perhaps saved lives.

NPR's David Schaper tells our Newscast unit that Amtrak and other railroads are behind schedule in rolling out the technology.

He filed this report:

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Around the Nation
4:43 am
Thu May 14, 2015

NTSB Probe Focuses On Speed In Amtrak Derailment In Philadelphia

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 7:21 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
3:14 am
Thu May 14, 2015

NTSB Investigators Plan To Interview Engineer Of Derailed Amtrak Train

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 6:05 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Shots - Health News
1:35 am
Thu May 14, 2015

A Database Of All Things Brainy

The Allen Cell Types Database catalogs all sorts of details about each type of brain cell, including its shape and electrical activity. These cells, taken from the visual area of a mouse brain, are colored according to the patterns of electrical activity they produce.
Courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 10:15 am

When the brain needs to remember a phone number or learn a new dance step, it creates a circuit by connecting different types of neurons.

Scientists still don't know how many types of neurons there are or exactly what each type does.

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Code Switch
1:34 am
Thu May 14, 2015

N.Y. Police Shooting Case Divides City's Asian-Americans

NYPD Officer Peter Liang arrives at Kings County Supreme Court in Brooklyn, N.Y., after being indicted for the fatal shooting of an unarmed man while patrolling the darkened stairwell of a Brooklyn housing project last November.
Shannon Stapleton Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 2:00 pm

Of all the police officers involved in the recent deaths of unarmed men which have drawn national attention, only one is Asian-American – New York City Police Officer Peter Liang, the son of Chinese immigrants.

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Shots - Health News
1:32 am
Thu May 14, 2015

Long-Term Depression May Boost Stroke Risk Long After Mood Improves

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 7:51 am

Medical researchers have known for several years that there is some sort of link between long-term depression and an increased risk of stroke. But now scientists are finding that even after such depression eases, the risk of stroke can remain high.

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U.S.
1:29 am
Thu May 14, 2015

Police Rethink Tactics Amid New Technologies And Social Pressure

Officers stand watch at the intersection of West North Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue as protesters walk for Freddie Gray in Baltimore in April. Gray died from spinal injuries about a week after he was arrested and transported in a police van.
Jabin Botsford The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 7:24 pm

This week in Washington, thousands of sworn officers gathered for National Police Week, an annual commemoration of the lives of officers who've died on the job.

This year it was hard for participants to escape the shadow of the anti-police protests of the past nine months. One of the week's events, a memorial bicycle ride, even was rerouted away from Baltimore, to make sure the nearly 2,000 officers participating in the ride wouldn't become targets.

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It's All Politics
4:56 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

How Do You Say 'Snafu' In Japanese?

When Democratic opposition delayed a major Asia-Pacific trade deal, White House press secretary Josh Earnest was asked if the administration had to do some hand-holding with the 11 countries involved in the talks. "I don't know how 'snafu' translates into a variety of Asian languages," he said.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 5:02 pm

The Senate looks ready to move ahead with trade legislation, after a daylong delay that the Obama administration repeatedly described as a "snafu."

"These kinds of procedural snafus are not uncommon," said White House spokesman Josh Earnest after Democrats held up the bill, which would give President Obama authority to expedite passage of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

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The Salt
4:36 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

There's More To Farm-Fresh Prairie Food Than Steak And Soybeans

At ZJ Farm in Solon, Iowa, Susan Jutz, left, walks with her friend and mentor of Kate Edwards, right, of Wild Woods Farms. Once the plants get big enough at ZJ Farm Edwards transplants them to Wild Woods.
Dana Damewood Courtesy of Agate Publishing

Think local Nebraska food, and Omaha's famous steaks may come to mind. The Great Plains are indeed an agricultural powerhouse when it comes to commodities like feed corn, soybeans, beef and pork.

But as food journalist Summer Miller tells Meghna Chakrabarti of NPR's Here & Now, there's much more on offer these days in Nebraska, as well as in its Great Plains neighbors Iowa and South Dakota.

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It's All Politics
4:11 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

Train Derailment Highlights Amtrak's Infrastructure Needs

An Amtrak train leaves Chicago's Union Station on its way to Los Angeles.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 4:56 pm

Amtrak was formed in the 1970s out of the ashes of several bankrupt rail lines, including the Penn Central. Its has been criticized for poor service, and shaky finances, but its safety record has been good.

More than 31 million passengers rode Amtrak in fiscal year 2013, the last for which figures are available. In the Northeast Corridor, more than 2,000 trains operate daily on Amtrak's rails, between commuter lines and Amtrak trains. And far more passengers ride Amtrak between Washington, New York and Boston than fly.

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