U.S. News

Around the Nation
2:54 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

15 Years Of Wrangling Over Yellowstone Snowmobiles Ends

A bison crosses a road ahead of a herd of snowmobilers in Yellowstone National Park in 2003. New federal rules announced Tuesday will further restrict the noise and exhaust such vehicles are allowed to emit inside the park.
Craig Moore AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 7:08 pm

The U.S. government Tuesday announced new rules for snowmobiles in Yellowstone that should make the country's oldest national park cleaner and quieter.

The rules were 15 years in the making because of intense wrangling between snowmobile operators and environmentalists. But both groups support the plan and give credit to snowmobile makers for designing cleaner machines.

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It's All Politics
2:53 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Public Support For Marijuana Legalization Hits Record High

An ATM sits next to a rack of marijuana clone plants that are used to grow medical marijuana on Wednesday at The Joint, a medical marijuana cooperative in Seattle. Last week Washington became the second U.S. state to adopt rules for the recreational sale of marijuana.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:50 pm

A record number of Americans are in favor of legalizing marijuana, according to a new Gallup poll released Tuesday.

The poll, which was conducted Oct. 3-6, reports that 58 percent of the public supports the legalization of marijuana, while 39 percent opposes it.

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

In Cost-Cutting Move, NOAA To Stop Printing Nautical Charts

This undated photo made available by NOAA shows a computer displaying an electronic nautical chart aboard a ship.
AP

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 9:21 am

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the federal agency charged with surveying the nation's navigable waters to help keep mariners off the rocks and out of the shallows, will cease printing paper charts after mid-April.

Partly as a cost-saving measure, the NOAA's Office of Coast Survey will offer charts only via on-demand printing, as PDFs or electronic charts.

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Shots - Health News
2:10 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Doctors Enlist Therapists To Deliver Better, Cheaper Care

Tyler Engel with his parents, Dave and Jennifer. His doctor and therapist worked with the family to help Tyler recover from a concussion.
Kristian Foden-Vencil OPB

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 10:21 am

The state of Oregon is trying some experiments to bring different kinds of medical professionals under the same roof. Patients can see different kinds of doctors in one visit, and the hope is it will provide better patient care, eventually at less cost to the state.

This can make sense in a primary-care setting, where doctors often have to deal with stomachaches and migraines that stem from mental rather than physical problems.

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Economy
1:25 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Job Growth Was Disappointing, But Some See Reasons For Hope

Hans Kahl (left) speaks with prospective employees at a job fair for veterans, in Miami on Tuesday. With job growth still slow, the Federal Reserve may keep trying to stimulate the economy.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 1:49 pm

When it finally came out Tuesday, the September jobs report — delayed for 18 days by the government shutdown — showed a labor market moving forward. But the pace was slow enough to prompt many economists to view it as a letdown.

Job growth "is disappointing, given that employment is still down by about 1.8 million from its peak prior to the recession," Gus Faucher, senior economist with PNC Financial Services Group, said in his analysis.

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Shots - Health News
1:19 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Want Your Daughter To Be A Science Whiz? Soccer Might Help

Very few girls get the recommended 60 minutes of exercise daily. But physical activity could help with school, a study says.
evoo73 Flickr

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 10:22 am

Girls who were more physically active at age 11 did better at school as teenagers, a study finds. And the most active girls really aced science.

It's become pretty much a given that children do better academically when they get regular exercise, even though schools continue to cut or even eliminate recess time. But there's surprisingly little hard evidence to back that up.

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The Salt
10:37 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Meatless Monday Movement Gets More Veggies On The Menu

One of the meatless dishes prepared at Benson Brewery in Omaha, Neb., for Meatless Monday is zucchini ribbon salad with a dressing made from roasted garlic and tahini, and garnished with green onions and toasted pine nuts.
Courtesy of Vegan Omaha

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 1:31 pm

America's relationship with meat is an indulgent one. At 270 pounds of meat per person per year, Americans consume more than almost anyone else in the world. (Mostly, we have our livestock producers' successes to thank for making meat cheap and abundant for us.)

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Parenting
10:28 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Maryville Case: A Parent's Worst Nightmare

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 10:35 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
4:44 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Trains Running Again In San Francisco As BART Strike Ends

Ready to go back into service: Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) train cars at a station in Oakland, Calif.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 9:39 am

Commuters in the San Francisco area should see things start returning to normal Tuesday, thanks to an overnight agreement that has ended a strike by workers at the transit system known as BART.

The walkout began Friday. Around 10:30 p.m. local time Monday (1:30 a.m. ET Tuesday), Bay Area Rapid Transit management and representatives of the workers' unions announced they had reached a deal.

Details of the agreement weren't released, but according to KQED:

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U.S.
3:35 am
Tue October 22, 2013

World War II Veteran Honored Decades Later

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 4:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news: in a quiet ceremony in Tulsa last night, this country delivered some long-overdue thanks. Phillip Coon received three medals for his service in World War II. Mr. Coon is 94. Like many veterans, he simply had not been issued the medals, including a Bronze Star, even though he had been entitled to them for decades.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:50 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Women Break New Ground In Marine Infantry Training

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 4:53 am

Female Marines have been training for the past month at Camp Lejeune, trying to make it through infantry training. They've got a month to go, including a 12-mile hike with a heavy pack. They're the first ones ever to handle the training, part of an effort to integrate women into combat positions by 2016.

Around the Nation
1:23 am
Tue October 22, 2013

West Point Women: A Natural Pattern Or A Camouflage Ceiling?

At the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., the graduating class has been about 16 percent female since the institution first accepted women more than 30 years ago.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 9:53 am

At the 200-year-old U.S. Military Academy at West Point, tradition dictates everything. That includes the habit of having freshmen stand in the yard everyday and call cadets to lunch. It's also tradition that the overwhelming majority of the graduating class will be white and 84 percent male.

Some say those rates are due to natural patterns of matriculation.

"Women will naturally matriculate — or, they have naturally matriculated — into the academy at about the 16 to 17 percent rate," says West Point admissions director Col. Deborah McDonald.

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The Two-Way
5:01 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

It's Back To The Future For E-Cigarette Ads, At Least For Now

The FDA is expected to determine whether e-cigarettes should be regulated like tobacco products later this month.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 1:23 pm

  • Listen To Melissa Block's Coverage Of The E-cigarette Industry

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It's All Politics
4:38 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Christie's Gay Marriage Decision Has Primary Consequences

Republican New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie debates Democratic challenger Barbara Buono at Montclair University in Montclair, N.J., on Tuesday. Christie's decision not to fight gay marriage in the state takes away an issue Buono had been campaigning hard on.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 5:35 am

Republican Chris Christie's decision Monday to drop his administration's legal challenge to same-sex marriage made perfect sense for the governor of New Jersey,

But for the potential 2016 presidential candidate, whose path would presumably start in Iowa — where the Republican Party is dominated by social conservatives — the calculation is a bit more complicated.

Bob Vander Plaats, Iowa's powerful evangelical conservative, put it bluntly Monday.

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Shots - Health News
4:21 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

How Long Do They Really Have To Fix That Obamacare Website?

The mood wasn't sunny at the White House Rose Garden on Monday, as President Obama addressed the errors plaguing the computer system for health insurance enrollment.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 6:06 pm

They've got a few weeks.

But if federal officials can't get the new online insurance marketplace running smoothly by mid-November, the problems plaguing the three-week-old website could become a far bigger threat to the success of the health law, hampering enrollment and fueling opponents' calls to delay implementation, analysts say.

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The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Cold Crime: Jell-O Stolen From Work Fridge Sparks Police Call

The limits of workplace theft are being tested in Pennsylvania, where a man called police this month to complain that his Jell-O had been stolen. The flavor was strawberry, he said. And it wasn't the first instance of fridge-theft.

The story comes from Philadelphia's CBS KYW-TV:

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It's All Politics
4:03 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

5 Questions Kathleen Sebelius Must Answer

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius is likely to have a very long day when she testifies before Congress about the Affordable Care Act website problems.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 5:12 pm

The hottest hot seat in Washington is the one occupied by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, whose office confirmed Monday she'll testify about the Internet disaster that is HealthCare.gov, the Affordable Care Act website.

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The Two-Way
3:18 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Government Shutdown Delays Rocket Launch

A Minotaur I at Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.
NASA

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:36 am

The launch of a rocket carrying a record-breaking 29 satellites — originally set for early next month — will be delayed by a few weeks after the partial government shutdown halted preparations.

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Economy
3:07 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Volkswagen Union Opposed By Tennessee Republican Officials

Volkswagen's car plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., is the company's only one in the U.S. It's also the only VW plant around the world without a workers union.
Volkswagen

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:10 am

When it comes to union organizing at an auto plant, the tension is typically between the workers and the management. But not at Volkswagen in Tennessee. There, the United Auto Workers is attempting to finally unionize the automaker's first foreign-owned plant in the South. And so far, Republican officials are the ones trying to stand in the way.

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Around the Nation
2:59 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

In Gritty Camden, N.J., Old-School Tactics And New Tech Cut Crime

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Cities often strive to break records. But we have a story now of one city, Camden, New Jersey and the record it's trying desperately not to break: The record for most murders in a year.

Twenty-twelve was a bad year for Camden and, as Elizabeth Fiedler of member station WHYY reports, a new county police force is doing all it can to make 2013 safer.

ELIZABETH FIEDLER, BYLINE: On a wall in Camden County Police Chief Scott Thomson's office, hangs a painting of George Washington kneeling in the snow next to a horse.

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Technology
2:59 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Small Kentucky Town Makes High-Tech Glass Amid Bucolic Farmland

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 9:08 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

I'm Melissa Block. And it's time now for All Tech Considered. This week, we visit the small farming town of Harrodsburg, Kentucky. It's the home of something called Willow Glass, glass that's super thin and flexible and soon find its way into the high-tech marketplace. It's made by Corning in the same plant that developed Gorilla Glass, that's the stuff Apple uses to make the protective cover for its iPhone.

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Religion
2:59 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

At A Younger Age, Mormon Women Are Eager To Share Their Faith

Alisa Baumgartner chats with fellow missionary Andrea Jackson. Jackson, 19, is taking 18 months off from college to do mission work.
Stina Sieg KJZZ

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 2:29 pm

Tara Carpenter points to a wall map to show where she'll soon spend 18 months proselytizing.

"The left side of Kentucky, just a teeny, tiny bit of Illinois, and I think I'm a little bit in Missouri," she says.

Carpenter, 19, is smiley and outgoing. About a year ago, she was thinking about going on a mission — but only thinking about it, because women in the Mormon Church couldn't be missionaries until 21.

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Around the Nation
2:59 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Shooting At Nev. Middle School Leaves Two Dead, Two Wounded

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

There's news today of another school shooting. This one in Nevada, at Sparks Middle School near Reno. Two people are dead - a teacher and a student who's believed to be the gunman. Two other students were injured and are in the hospital. NPR's Ted Robbins has more.

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Around the Nation
2:59 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Gay Couples Tie Knot In New Jersey As Christie Backs Down

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Governor Chris Christie has dropped his legal challenge to same-sex marriage in New Jersey. His announcement came just hours after same-sex couples there began tying the knot for the first time.

As NPR's Joel Rose reports, Christie's decision means New Jersey is effectively the 14th state to recognize same-sex marriage.

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All Tech Considered
2:12 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

The HealthCare.gov 'Tech Surge' Is Racing Against The Clock

HealthCare.gov has been plagued with problems since the health insurance exchange site opened Oct. 1.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:10 am

A "tech surge" is underway to help clean up the code of the error-plagued HealthCare.gov site.

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The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Fugitive Arrest: Former Banking Executive Caught In Italy

Former UBS banking executive Raoul Weil was indicted by a U.S. federal grand jury in 2008, on charges that he helped wealthy clients avoid billions in taxes.
Antonio Calanni AP

A former UBS bank executive who has been a fugitive since being indicted on federal charges in 2008 has been arrested in Italy. Swiss citizen Raoul Weil, the former head of UBS Global Wealth Management International, is accused of defrauding the U.S. government by helping clients evade taxes.

From Rome, NPR's Sylvia Poggioli filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Salt
1:20 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Two Bagger

The truth is in there.
NPR

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 3:21 pm

A food named for its size sets a certain expectation. When you order a McDonald's Quarter Pounder, or Taco Bell's Acre of Beans, you expect volume and satisfaction.

Could the Two Bagger from Lucky's Sandwich Co. here in Chicago, topped with corned beef, pastrami, cole slaw, french fries and cheese, promise even more?

Eva: Two Bags are the only clothes that fit me now.

Robert: Should I be worried they got the two bags out of the front seat pocket of an airplane?

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Law
10:00 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Combating Domestic Violence: One Size Doesn't Fit All

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 4:58 pm

More than 1 in 3 women in the United States will experience physical violence, rape or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetimes.

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The Two-Way
9:20 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Supreme Court Will Hear Case On Executions And Mental Disability

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 12:40 pm

The standard by which a person is judged to be mentally competent enough to face execution for a crime will be reviewed by the U.S. Supreme Court, which agreed Monday to hear a Florida case revolving around that issue.

The capital punishment case, Hall, Freddie L. v. Fla., centers on the standard for judging mental disability and how state officials arrive at that judgment. The case will be argued in Washington early in 2014.

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The Protojournalist
9:19 am
Mon October 21, 2013

The Mist And Mystique Of Dry Ice

makes snow in the lab using dry ice." href="/post/mist-and-mystique-dry-ice" class="noexit lightbox">
Vincent Schaefer, one of the General Electric scientists who worked on Project Cirrus in the 1940s, makes snow in the lab using dry ice.
General Electric

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 5:29 pm

Several prank bombs caused paranoia at Los Angeles International Airport last week. One — packed in a 20-ounce soda bottle — exploded in a restroom, one on the tarmac and a third was found just fizzling.

No one was injured.

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