U.S. News

The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Administration Invites HealthCare.gov Users To Try Again

A woman looks at the HealthCare.gov insurance exchange internet site October 1, 2013.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:11 pm

If at first you don't succeed, try again.

That's the message from the White House on Tuesday, with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) asking more than 275,000 people who tried and failed to sign up for health plans on the stalled HealthCare.gov website to give it another shot.

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Shots - Health News
2:46 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Medicaid Questions Slow Insurance Purchases On Colorado Exchange

Click right this way for Medicaid.
Connect for Health

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 3:39 pm

If you want to meet somebody who's really happy with the Affordable Care Act, then say hello to Sue Birch, Colorado's Medicaid director.

Nearly 40,000 Coloradans signed up for health coverage on the state's new marketplace, Connect for Health Colorado, rather than HealthCare.gov.

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NPR Story
2:46 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Obama Taps Treasury's Bailout Lawyer To Lead Derivatives Watchdog

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:56 pm

Timothy Massad is nominated to head the Commodities Futures Trading Commission. He would replace Gary Gensler, whose four-year tenure was marred by questions of his professional ties to Jon Corzine and the downfall of MF Global.

It's All Politics
2:31 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Close, Closer, Closest: A Guide To Election Photo Finishes

Democrat Al Franken, with his wife, Frannie, meets reporters and a small gathering of supporters at their house in Minneapolis on June 30, 2009, after the Minnesota Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Democrat in the Senate race against Republican Norm Coleman.
Andy King AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:36 pm

The Virginia attorney general's race, which cut a relatively low profile heading into Election Day, now has a chance to end up as part of history.

With more than 2.2 million ballots cast and Democratic state Sen. Mark Herring leading Republican state Sen. Mark Obenshain by a mere 117 votes, the election is shaping up as one of the closest statewide contests in decades.

With a recount looming, the winner isn't expected to be officially declared until December. But in the meantime, here's a look back at some of the closest statewide elections of the past five decades:

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Nigerian Pirates Free Kidnapped U.S. Mariners

Fighters with the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND), pictured in 2008. The rebel group claimed responsibility for the kidnapping.
Pius Utomi Ekpei AFP/Getty Images

Two U.S. crewmembers seized last month from a ship off the coast of Nigeria have been released by their pirate captors, the State Department said Tuesday.

The captain and engineer from the U.S.-flagged C-Retriever, a 222-foot offshore resupply, were abducted on Oct. 23 when gunman boarded the vessel.

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The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Larry Flynt Seeks To Block Execution Of Man Who Shot Him

Hustler magazine magnate Larry Flynt, pictured during a 2007 news conference in his office in Beverly Hills, Calif.
Kevork Djansezian AP

Larry Flynt doesn't want the man who shot him to die.

The pornography publisher was shot and paralyzed in 1978 by Joseph Paul Franklin, a white supremacist who objected to a photo spread of an African American man and a white woman published in Hustler magazine.

Franklin is scheduled to be executed on Nov. 20 for a 1977 murder committed outside a synagogue in a St. Louis suburb.

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The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

How About A Coke? Warhol Painting Up For Grabs

Coca-Cola (3) was one of many of Warhol's pop art pieces, which celebrated popular culture and consumerism in post-World War II America.
Courtesy of Christie's

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 2:59 pm

On Tuesday, artist Andy Warhol's oversized and iconic Coca-Cola (3) will hit the auction block at Christie's, and to borrow an old slogan from the company, It's The Real Thing.

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The Two-Way
9:45 am
Tue November 12, 2013

New York's One World Trade Center Declared Tallest Building In U.S.

The world's tallest buildings by architectural top.
CTBUH

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:02 pm

One World Trade Center — the skyscraper that now rises from the site of the Twin Towers, destroyed during the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11 — has been declared the tallest building in the U.S. by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

Coming in at 1,776 feet tall, the World Trade Center beat out the Willis Tower in Chicago. At issue was whether a 408-foot needle that sits atop the New York building was an architectural top or a removable radio antenna. If it had been deemed an antenna, the honor would have gone to Chicago.

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The Two-Way
9:39 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Mexican Officials Say Former Texas Cop Led Kidnap Ring

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 4:46 pm

A man who served in the U.S. military and as a Texas police officer has been arrested near Monterrey, Mexico, where authorities say he led a kidnapping gang. The 32-year-old suspect is known by two names: Luis Ricardo Gonzalez Garcia and Javier Aguirre Cardenas, according to Mexican law enforcement officials. The 16-member gang is blamed for several violent crimes.

Officials say the suspect was traveling in a car in an upscale neighborhood on the edge of Monterrey last month when he was arrested. He was reportedly carrying a 9 mm handgun.

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Health
9:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Trans Fat Ban Could Bring Smaller Waistlines ... But At What Cost?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later today, in our parenting conversation and in honor of Native American Heritage Month, we want to take a closer look at research that suggests that the use of Native American imagery for sports and school mascots could actually be psychologically damaging to Native American children. We want to find out more about this later this hour.

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Environment
1:06 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Key West Awash With Plans For Rising Sea Level

A cyclist rides past buckled asphalt in Key West, Fla., after Hurricane Wilma in 2005. Key West experienced widespread flooding with the storm surge.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 4:00 pm

Florida — especially South Florida — is very flat and very low, and in places like Miami Beach and Key West, buildings are just 3 feet above sea level. Scientists now say there may be a 3-foot rise in the world's oceans by the end of the century.

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Reporter's Notebook
1:04 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Dwindling Middle Class Has Repercussions For Small Towns

When reporter Kelly McEvers stepped off the train in Lincoln, Ill., she asked, "What happened to my hometown?"
Kelly McEvers NPR

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 12:23 pm

My parents moved away from Lincoln, Ill., two decades ago, when I was in college. I hardly ever get back there. But my mom still works in Lincoln, and it was to Lincoln I headed to meet her this fall, after returning to the U.S. from the Middle East.

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Shots - Health News
1:02 am
Tue November 12, 2013

The Case Against Brain Scans As Evidence In Court

When researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College scanned teenage brains, they found that the area that regulates emotional responses has to work harder to keep impulses in check.
Courtesty Kristina Caudle Developmental Neuroscience

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:39 pm

It's not just people who go on trial these days. It's their brains.

More and more lawyers are arguing that some defendants deserve special consideration because they have brains that are immature or impaired, says Nita Farahany, a professor of law and philosophy at Duke University who has been studying the use of brain science in court.

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Around the Nation
12:54 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Philippine Ex-Pats In Calif. Contribute To Typhoon Relief

Many Filipinos living in the United States are frantically trying to get in touch with loved ones in some of the areas hardest hit by the typhoon. California, with about a million Filipino immigrants, is the center for a large fundraising effort.

Los Angeles is home to one of the largest concentrations of Filipino immigrants in the U.S. Many across this city are glued to the local Asian TV stations' nightly news broadcasts. Some are turning their worry and stress into action, pounding the pavement to raise money for typhoon victims.

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The Two-Way
3:27 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Atlanta Braves Shock Fans With Plan To Move To Suburbs

Undeveloped land stands in the area where a new stadium will be built for the Atlanta Braves. Monday, the team announced that it will leave Turner Field and move into a new stadium outside the city.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:21 pm

In a move that took many fans by surprise, the Atlanta Braves announced Monday that the team will move to the city's suburbs, where it will build a new stadium. The team's lease on Turner Field, the Braves' home since 1997, will expire in 2016.

The new stadium will be located "just outside Atlanta's city limits," reports Atlanta Daily World.

Georgia Public Broadcasting's Jane Hammond reports:

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Code Switch
3:11 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

In California, A High School That Cheers A-R-A-B-S

MyDesert.com." href="/post/california-high-school-cheers-r-b-s" class="noexit lightbox">
The Coachella Valley High School mascot gives the thumbs up at a 2010 football game. Image courtesy of MyDesert.com.
Jay Calderon Courtesy of The Desert Sun

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

Last week, Coachella Valley High School came under fire for the name of its mascot — the Arab. The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee sent a letter to the school, complaining about the way the mascot depicts people of Arab descent. The complaint made the school national news.

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All Tech Considered
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Share And Share Alike: A Time Of Collaborative Consumption

Renting out your couches — or your entire place — is powered by San Francisco–based Airbnb, which has now connected more than half a million willing hosts and travelers in more than 34,000 cities.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:17 pm

This week on-air and online, the tech team is exploring the sharing economy. You'll find the stories on this blog, aggregated here and we would love to hear your questions about the topic. Just email, leave a comment or tweet.

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Around the Nation
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

'Honor Flights' Race To Bring WWII Vets To D.C. Memorial

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

More than 16 million American's fought in World War II. There's only about a million of them who are still alive and they're all older than 80. Hundreds are dying each day. A non-profit group has made it their mission to honor these remaining veterans by flying them to Washington, D.C., to visit the World War II memorial. The trip isn't something many veterans at this age can do — or afford — on their own. Since the first "Honor Flight" in 2005, groups in almost every state have followed suit and more than 100,000 vets have taken the journey.

Around the Nation
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Obama Honors Veterans And Promises Continued Support

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

President Obama's reached out to veterans Monday in a number of ways to mark the Veteran's Day holiday.

It's All Politics
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Senate Votes To Send A Message Ahead Of Next Year's Election

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid speaks during a news conference as the Senate prepares to vote on a bill that would prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation on Thursday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

Midterm elections are still a year off, but the scramble to gain a political edge at the polls is already well underway on Capitol Hill.

Bills are brought up and votes taken not so much in hopes they will prevail, but rather to send a political message. In the Senate, both parties are at it.

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Business
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

It's A New Orleans Mantra, But Using 'Who Dat' May Cost You

The phrase "Who Dat" is ubiquitous in New Orleans. A Texas-based company says it owns the rights to the phrase, and while homemade signs don't run afoul of its trademark, it says merchandise like T-shirts is another matter.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:46 pm

During pro football season, New Orleans becomes " 'Who Dat' Nation." Fans open New Orleans Saints games with the signature chant and use it to rattle the eardrums of opponents during play.

Since the Saints' Super Bowl win in 2010, the phrase has popped up everywhere, from T-shirts to business names. Even people who don't watch football call themselves "Who Dats." But a messy legal question keeps rearing its head here: Who owns "Who Dat"?

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The Two-Way
2:28 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Thanking Veterans And Remembering Their Sacrifices

Members of the New York State National Guard march in the annual Veterans Day Parade on Fifth Avenue in New York Monday. The parade honored all veterans, with a special salute to women in uniform.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Americans are marking Veterans Day in a variety of ways Monday, from public ceremonies to proud notes on social media and quiet remembrances in homes and offices. Photos of husbands and grandfathers, mothers and sisters popped up on Facebook as a way to honor military veterans; on Twitter, the top four tags Monday afternoon revolved around veterans.

Here's a rundown of events and stories about those who served:

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The Two-Way
1:22 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Police: Indie Musicians Killed By Former Bandmate In NYC

Police say three musicians, two from an Iranian-American indie rock group, were shot and killed early Monday and a fourth person was wounded in the East Williamsburg area of Brooklyn, New York. The alleged assailant, who took his own life, was also a musician, they said.

According to The Associated Press:

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All Tech Considered
11:57 am
Mon November 11, 2013

A Few Places Where Government Tech Procurement Works

Kansas City is one of the cities making technology a bigger priority in its procurement processes.
Brent Flanders Flickr

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

The botched start of HealthCare.gov is just the latest big federal tech system to fail at launch, but information technology research group Standish found that during the last decade, 94 percent of the large-scale federal IT projects have been similarly unsuccessful.

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Shots - Health News
11:21 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Movies Rated PG-13 Feature The Most Gun Violence

Gun violence has become increasingly common in PG-13 movies like The Avengers, released in 2012.
Zade Rosenthal AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 11:33 am

Parents who rely on movie ratings to decide what their children can watch may think that PG-13 films have fewer villains flashing guns than R-rated movies.

But they're wrong.

The PG-13 movies actually show more gun violence, a study finds.

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Books
8:49 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Africana Book Awards: There's More To Africa Than Animals

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 10:16 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now to an award dedicated to giving young American readers an accurate and balanced account of Africa. Parents and teachers looking for books that go beyond the portrayal of lions and giraffes or safaris might want to check out the winners of this year's Children's Africana Book Awards. The prize, which was awarded on Saturday night, was set up to showcase the best children's books about Africa that are published in the U.S.

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U.S.
8:49 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Forget The 50 States; The U.S. Is Really 11 Nations, Author Says

Colin Woodard's map of the "11 nations."
Colin Woodard

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 9:56 am

For hundreds of years, this nation has been known as the United States of America. But according to author and journalist Colin Woodard, the country is neither united, nor made up of 50 states. Woodward has studied American voting patterns, demographics and public opinion polls going back to the days of the first settlers, and says that his research shows America is really made up of 11 different nations.

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U.S.
8:49 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Military Women Combat Challenges in Service

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:38 am

On Veteran's Day, we honor those who have served by talking with five women who have fought for this country. All five are also authors. We hear how they hope to encourage a new generation of women in the military. Join @TellMeMoreNPR for a Live Twitter chat at 11:00am ET. We will talk about women in combat, race in the military, balancing career & motherhood and why women choose to serve.

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Around the Nation
6:03 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Doolittle Raiders Offer Final Toast To 71-Year-Old Mission

Staff Sgt. David J. Thatcher (left), Lt. Col. Edward Saylor (center) and Lt. Col. Richard Cole (right) stand at the Doolittle Raider Monument at Memorial Park in Dayton, Ohio.
Jerry Kenney WYSO

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 8:11 am

On April 18, 1942, in response to the Japanese attack the previous December on Pearl Harbor, 80 men in 16 B-25 bombers took off on a secret mission to bomb Japan. Led by James H. "Jimmy" Doolittle, they became known as the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders.

On Saturday, three of the four remaining Raiders met for what is likely to be the last time at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Seeing Opportunity In A Question: 'Where Are You Really From?'

Alex Sugiura was featured, along with his brother and other mixed-race Americans, in the 125th anniversary issue of National Geographic Magazine in October. The brothers are of Japanese and Eastern European descent, but people often mistake Alex for Hispanic.
Martin Schoeller National Geographic

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 9:40 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

"Where are you from?"

"No, really, where are you from?"

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