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Now to Hollywood, where the first major awards ceremony of the season, the Golden Globes, is being held tonight. For weeks now, it's been obvious that the evening will reckon some way or another with one of the major stories of the past year.

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North Koreans' Attitudes Of The U.S.

Jan 7, 2018

The relationship between President Trump and Kim Jong Un made headlines again. NPR's Michel Martin talks with North Korea expert Jean H. Lee of the Wilson Center about how people on the Korean peninsula view the U.S.

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If you hear the word "millennial" and immediately think of an entitled 20-something, scrolling through Instagram and munching on avocado toast — Michael Hobbes wants to have a word with you.

"There's really very little evidence that millennials are any more spoiled or any more entitled than any generation of young people that came before," he says. "But there is a mountain of evidence that things are objectively harder for us."

When it comes to meeting that special someone, we've gone from IRL to swiping right. Online dating has changed the way people meet and communicate — and as that old saying goes, when you're trying to find bae, communication is key.

With new ways to flirt, date and find love come new lingo to describe the adventures — or misadventures — of online dating.

As part of Morning Edition's series, What Makes Us Click, here are some words and terms in the online dating lexicon.

Bae

Editor's note on Jan. 18: This story should have noted that artnet News was the first to report that the High Museum's proportion of nonwhite visitors has grown to 45 percent and now is close to the percentage of people of color who live in the Atlanta metropolitan area. That news site's report about the museum's "valuable case study" concerning how to diversify audiences is online here.

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John Young, who was one of NASA's most experienced astronauts and the first to fly in space six times, including a moon landing, died on Friday after complications from pneumonia. He was 87.

In NASA's history, few astronauts were more accomplished than John Young. His career was filled with firsts: he was the first to fly in space six times. He was on the first Gemini mission and he commanded the first shuttle flight. (He was also one of 12 people to walk on the moon.)

President Trump took to Twitter on Saturday to highlight the historic drop in the unemployment rate among African-Americans, a day after the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced that the rate fell below 7 percent for the month of December — the lowest mark for black Americans since the bureau began tracking the data in the early 1970s.

"The African American unemployment rate fell to 6.8%, the lowest rate in 45 years. I am so happy about this News! And, in the Washington Post (of all places), headline states, 'Trumps first year jobs numbers were very, very good.' "

Updated at 1:07 p.m. ET

President Trump insisted Saturday that he is "a very stable genius," following the recent publication of a book that raises questions about his mental state and fitness for office.

Speaking to reporters at Camp David on Saturday, Trump called Michael Wolff, author of Fire and Fury: Inside The Trump White House, "a fraud" and reiterated his earlier claim on Twitter that Wolff is not trustworthy.

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Republican Opposition To Offshore Drilling

Jan 6, 2018

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The Trump Administration announced this week it would open nearly 90 percent of the U.S. coast to offshore drilling. That would include areas of Alaska, the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and the Gulf of Mexico to explore for oil and gas.

Responding To The Protests In Iran

Jan 6, 2018

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Support For Marijuana In Coal Country

Jan 6, 2018

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Coping With The Cold In Upstate New York

Jan 6, 2018

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What The New Tax Law Means For California

Jan 6, 2018

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After 30 years, the time has come. Robert Siegel is stepping down from the host chair of All Things Considered.

And so many listeners have said just how much they'll miss him.

They come from all walks of life, working as truck drivers, speech therapists and Lyft drivers. There are a lot of things they'll miss about Robert, but one thing most of all.

"This will sound funny, he has a soothing voice to me, like it's not soothing where it will put you to sleep, but it's just really calm," says Eurdora Evans, 35, of Harvey, La.

It's just a cold. But even though I know I'm not horribly ill, I feel this overwhelming need to skip work, ignore my family and retreat to the far corner of the sofa.

I'm not being a wimp, it turns out. Those feelings are a real thing called "sickness behavior," which is sparked by the body's response to infection. The same chemicals that tell the immune system to rush in and fend off invading viruses also tell us to slow down; skip the eating, drinking and sex; shun social interactions; and rest.

It's a new year and a new edition of our weekly education news roundup. welcome back!

DeVos plans to make it harder for defrauded students to get their money back

Authorities in Alabama are investigating a fire that destroyed the home of Tina Johnson, who accused Senate candidate Roy Moore of groping her in his office in 1991.

The fire at Johnson's home in Gadsden, Ala., occurred on Jan. 2 and was first reported by AL.com.

"I am devastated, just devastated. We have just the clothes on our backs," said Johnson on Friday morning as quoted by Al.com.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents need to have "reasonable suspicion" to carry out "advanced" searches on electronic devices, including smartphones and tablets, that belong to individuals entering or exiting the country, the agency announced Friday.

The updated rules allow agents to continue to inspect information that's stored on a device, not in the cloud. But from now on, they can't copy that information or connect to an external device to analyze the contents, unless they have reasonable suspicion of criminal behavior.

For at least the past decade, the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) has been the unrivaled voice of a vast industry, from neighborhood grocery stores to food manufacturing giants with supply chains that span the globe. Most recently, it's been a powerful force in fighting proposals to require information about added sugar or GMOs on food labels.

Some states are facing a mid-January loss of funding for their Children's Health Insurance Program despite spending approved by Congress in late December that was expected to keep the program running for three months, federal health officials said Friday.

The $2.85 billion was supposed to fund states' CHIP programs through March 31. But some states will start running out of money after Jan. 19, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. CMS did not say which states are likely to be affected first.

Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, a homeless undocumented immigrant, who was acquitted of murder in the shooting death of San Francisco resident Kate Steinle on a city pier, was sentenced to time already served for being a felon in possession of a gun.

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