U.S. News

Code Switch
3:02 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Activists: We Want An Emancipator, Not A 'Deporter In Chief'

Members of a coalition of Latino groups rally outside the Federal Building in Los Angeles on Wednesday. Activists say they plan more rallies and demonstrations across the country to push for action on immigration reform.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 4:59 pm

Activists who support an overhaul of the immigration system are angry and frustrated. The immigration bill that passed in the Senate in June is stalled out. Meanwhile, the Obama administration is on pace to deport some 2 million illegal immigrants since taking office six years ago.

Read more
Environment
3:02 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Review Of West Virginia Water Finds More Work To Be Done

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 4:59 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

A group of independent researchers has found that the chemical crude MCHM is still present in some West Virginia homes. That's the coal-cleaning chemical that spilled into the Elk River back in January out of a storage tank operated by the company Freedom Industries. The spill contaminated drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people. The research group was formed by West Virginia's governor after public pressure.

Dave Mistich of West Virginia Public Broadcasting reports on the research group's latest findings.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:02 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Covered For Mudslides? How This Insurance Is Different

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 4:59 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Kelly McEvers.

People across the state of Washington observed a moment of silence today to mark one week since a landslide washed over a square mile of land in the town of Oso.

Bonnie Rose manages a restaurant and ranch in Oso. She had to evacuate 150 people from the building. Now, the restaurant has become a kind of community center for survivors. Bonnie, welcome to the show.

BONNIE ROSE: Thank you.

MCEVERS: So you've opened back up now, huh?

Read more
U.S.
3:02 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Separated By Deportation, Family Plans To Reunite In Mexico

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 4:59 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. Arun Rath is away. I'm Kelly McEvers.

This month, the U.S. is projected to hit two million deportations since President Obama took office. That number has sparked protests by pro-immigration reform activists across the country. Next week, Obama will meet with the Hispanic caucus in Congress, but expectations are low now that comprehensive immigration reform is stalled in the House.

Jasmine Mendoza's family is one of the millions that's been separated by deportation.

Read more
Politics
11:28 am
Sat March 29, 2014

The Story Of Calif. Senator's Arrest Reads Like Pulp Fiction

San Francisco state Sen. Leland Yee leaves the San Francisco Federal Building after he was arrested and released on bond Wednesday.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 2:04 pm

It's a case that has stunned California's political community: A prominent Democratic lawmaker has been accused in a federal complaint of participating in an elaborate conspiracy involving guns, gangs, drugs and bribery.

State Sen. Leland Yee was known as a champion of open government and gun control, but not any more. A 137-page federal affidavit accuses the lawmaker of soliciting and taking bribes from an undercover FBI agent in exchange for political favors.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:20 am
Sat March 29, 2014

West Virginia's Governor Vetoes Abortion Ban

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 10:05 am

Calling a ban on abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy unconstitutional, Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin vetoed a bill that would have made it a crime to carry out such a procedure in West Virginia. Tomblin said the bill was a "detriment" to women's health and safety.

Read more
Health Care
10:51 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Latinos Wary Of All-Out Push To Sign Up For ACA

Planned Parenthood worker Alicia Gonzales promotes the Affordable Care Act during an outreach event for the Latino community in Los Angeles in September.
Jonathan Alcorn Reuters /Landov

All throughout the country, supporters of the Affordable Care Act have worked to reach the uninsured, holding health fairs and putting ads on TV and radio.

The push continues to get as many enrolled as possible, especially Latinos — the most uninsured group in the country.

Read more
StoryCorps
5:59 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Never Truly Over: Discussing Deployment A Challenge Of Its Own

Army Capt. Drew Pham says his wife, Molly Pearl, helps him push through the difficulties of transitioning back to civilian life after deployment in Afghanistan.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:27 am

Army Capt. Drew Pham, 26, returned from a tour in Afghanistan in October 2011. Since Drew's been back, it's been hard for him to make sense of what he saw there and adjust to his life at home. It's been difficult for his wife, Molly Pearl, to respond to some of the things he would tell her, too.

Pham called once to tell her he had shot a man. He says she didn't know what to say, so she replied, "Well, we'll deal with it when you get home."

Read more
Health Care
5:59 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Tape Of Hobby Lobby Case Shows Justices' Gender Differences

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:27 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This week, the U.S. Supreme Court jumped into the Affordable Care Act controversy again. At issue is whether for-profit corporations citing religious objections can refuse to include contraception coverage in a basic health care plan. Joining us in our studio is NPR's legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, who was at the argument. Nina, thanks so much for being with us.

NINA TOTENBERG, BYLINE: My pleasure.

SIMON: Let's begin with just the facts, ma'am, if we could.

Read more
The Salt
3:38 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Batter Up: Baseball Just Got Its Most Decorated Corn Dog

The Diamondbacks' D-bat Dog is an18-inch corn dog filled with cheese, bacon and jalapeño.
@DBACKS VIA TWITTER

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:27 am

Inside the kitchen of the Arizona Diamondbacks, chef Michael Snoke has created a monster: 18 inches of meat that's skewered, wrapped in cornbread, stuffed with bacon and infused with cheddar cheese and jalapeños.

All that rests on a bed of fries. And for $25, it's all yours.

"I have created the D-Bat," he says.

The Diamondback's executive chef has wanted to get in on the culinary competition that's sprung up between Major League Baseball teams.

Read more
It's All Politics
6:17 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

In Politics, Hog Castration Cuts Through The Ad Clutter

A lot more people now know who Iowa Republican Senate candidate Joni Ernst is, which was the point of the hog-castration line in her campaign ad.
YouTube screen shot Joni Ernst for Senate YouTube channel

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 9:14 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
4:41 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

GM Recalls More Cars Over Possible Faulty Ignition Switches

A 2010 Chevrolet Cobalt coupe sits on display at General Motors headquarters in Detroit in 2009.
David Zalubowski AP

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 5:35 am

General Motors is recalling an additional 824,000 small cars in the U.S., adding to the 1.37 million it recalled domestically last month, citing possible faulty ignition switches.

Worldwide, the latest announcement affects a total of 971,000 vehicles, on top of the 1.6 million recalled globally in February.

Read more
Code Switch
4:26 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Why A Proper Lady Found Herself Behind Bars

Mary Peabody leaves the dining room of a motel in St. Augustine, Fla., on March 31, 1964, after being arrested.
Harold Valentine AP

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 8:55 pm

This story is part of NPR's 50th anniversary coverage of 1964.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:41 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

In U.S., Mudslides Common, But Usually Few Deaths

Workers use heavy equipment to clear trees and other debris, near Darrington, Wash., on Thursday.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 1:31 am

Washington state, with its many steep slopes, streams and rivers and some of the heaviest annual rainfall in the country, is a mudslide waiting to happen. Add in soil erosion from logging, as was reportedly the case near the community of Oso before last week's tragedy, and the probability of such an event increases.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:17 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Norwegian Jens Stoltenberg Will Be NATO's Next Secretary-General

Former Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg pauses during an address to the media in Oslo on Friday, after NATO ambassadors chose him to be the next head of the alliance.
NTB Scanpix Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 5:29 pm

Jens Stoltenberg, a former prime minister of Norway, has been appointed to succeed Anders Fogh Rasmussen as NATO secretary-general, a post he will assume in October.

In an address in Oslo after he was selected by NATO ambassadors, Stoltenberg on Friday called the crisis over Ukraine "a brutal reminder of how important NATO is.

"I want to express my support that NATO does not accept the changing of borders by force within Europe," he said. "NATO has once again proven its relevance."

Read more
Around the Nation
3:17 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Families Mourn Missing As Search Continues In Washington State

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:34 pm

Audie Cornish speaks with Washington resident Diana Bejvl, who presumably has lost her son, Alan, and his fiancee, Delaney Webb, in the Washington area mudslide. Her grandparents are also missing.

Sports
3:10 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

American Pastime's Season Starts Off, In Australia

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

So long winter, so long spring training, the American past time gets back in full swing on Sunday and Monday, as Major League baseball begins around the country. But actually, officially speaking, it began already halfway around the world on a cricket ground in Australia. That's where the Los Angeles Dodgers won two games from the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Read more
U.S.
3:10 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Flashy Criminal-Turned-Model Citizen Arrested In San Francisco

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 10:24 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. Who is Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow? His story is as intriguing as his name suggests. Chow is a notorious San Francisco criminal turned model citizen, until this week when he was arrested again as part of a federal corruption investigation, an investigation that reached all the way to the California State House where a State Senator has been arrested in an FBI sweep in connection with Chow.

Read more
Politics
3:10 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Week In Politics: Obama In Brussels And A Bridge Scandal Report

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And we pick up there with our Friday regulars E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution. Hey there, E.J.

E.J. DIONNE: Hey.

CORNISH: And David Brooks of The New York Times. Hey David.

DAVID BROOKS: How are you?

CORNISH: So I want to continue the conversation about President Obama and go back to a speech he gave in Brussels on Wednesday. In it, he spoke about Russia, about NATO, about bigger ideas about the U.S. role in the world.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:55 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Why Playing Minecraft Might Be More Healthful For Kids Than TV

It's not exercise, but at least kids can't eat potato chips while gaming on phones.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 7:15 am

Doctors say children shouldn't log more than two hours a day of screen time, though what with phones, computers and TV most children put in much more.

But it may be that not all screens are equally evil.

Researchers from the University of Michigan found that sixth-graders who watched a lot of TV were more likely to eat junk food and drink soda than their peers who spent the same amount of time on the computer or playing video games, researchers from the University of Michigan say.

Read more
Shots - Health News
10:29 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Tax Change Helps Abused Spouses Get Health Insurance Subsidies

A victim of domestic abuse may not be able to file taxes jointly. Yet that was required for health insurance subsidies.
iStockphoto

Victims of domestic violence can have a hard time qualifying for subsidies to buy health insurance because of quirks in the health law. And they often need help. It now looks like there's something of a fix, as well as more time to enroll.

Read more
Parallels
7:56 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Japanese Baseball Began On My Family's Farm In Maine

Horace Wilson and other members of his family in a portrait believed to date to the 1860s. He's the mustachioed fellow standing at top right.
Courtesy of Abigail Sanborn

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:34 pm

There's this strange story about my family that doesn't often come up in casual conversation. We don't talk about it much. I had to prod them when I donned my headphones and stuck a microphone in their faces to do this story. But as soon as we share, people shout, "Why didn't you tell me about that before?"

Here it is: My great-great-great-uncle introduced baseball to Japan.

Read more
U.S.
6:01 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Of Me I Sing: Americans Construct An Opt-Out Society

Parents are being encouraged to keep their children from taking standardized tests in school.
Shannon DeCelle AP

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 1:01 pm

Americans want to go their own way.

The right of individuals to question authority is one of the strongest facets of American life. But the ability to strike out on your own has always been balanced against the need for communal action in a complicated, continental country.

Right now, the pendulum is swinging more toward individualism.

Read more
NPR Story
2:58 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Landslide Debris Makes Search And Recovery Excruciating Slow

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 9:24 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's day six of the search and rescue operation at the site of the landslide in Oso, Washington. The death toll stands right now at 26. Ninety people are still reported missing. That's left many families in limbo waiting for news. NPR's Martin Kaste reports on why the recovery work has been so excruciatingly slow.

Read more
The Salt
1:27 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Why We Got Fatter During The Fat-Free Food Boom

The 1990s were rife with low-fat packaged snacks, from potato chips to cookies.
Youtube and RetroJunk

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 9:24 am

If you want to trace Americans' fear of fat, the place to start is the U.S. Senate, during the steamy days of July 1976.

That's when Sen. George McGovern called a hearing to raise attention to the links between diet and disease.

And what was the urgency? The economy was booming, and many Americans were living high on the hog. A 1954 Capitol Hill restaurant menu offers a glimpse of what lunch looked like then: steak with claret sauce, buttered succotash and pineapple cheesecake. But soon, that prosperity began to cast a dark shadow within the halls of Congress.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:27 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Obamacare's National Enrollment Looks OK, But States Matter More

Maygan Rollins, a field organizer with Enroll America, talked health insurance options with Jerry Correa during a recent campaign in Miami.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 10:23 pm

With this year's deadline to register for individual health insurance just a weekend away, much attention is being lavished on two numbers — the 6 million Americans who have signed up so far, and the percentage of those folks who are (or aren't) young.

But experts say the national numbers actually don't mean very much.

Read more
It's All Politics
5:01 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

The Pope And The President: Common Ground But A Clear Divide

Despite some differences, President Obama and Pope Francis shared a laugh during their Thursday meeting at the Vatican. Obama called himself a "great admirer" of the pope.
Gabriel Bouys AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 11:04 am

President Obama's Vatican meeting with Pope Francis wasn't without a dose of irony.

The U.S. president, once the world leader whose vow of "hope" and "change" excited millions, seemed eclipsed Thursday in that department by the pope.

Read more
The Changing Lives Of Women
4:31 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Women And Wealth: Local To Global Money Lessons

She Works Her Money." href="/post/women-and-wealth-local-global-money-lessons" class="noexit lightbox">
Our Women and Wealth series will involve you, too. We're asking women to share their best lessons about earning, saving, investing or using money. The above quote comes from Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn. You can see more from her, and other influential women, and add your two cents at our Tumblr, She Works Her Money.
NPR

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 5:39 pm

When it comes to money, women rule. Literally.

Think about it: A woman holds the top job at the Federal Reserve, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Office of Management and Budget, and the Social Security Administration.

At the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde is the managing director.

These women run large, complex organizations that decide how money is invested, budgeted, saved and spent. They shape the rules that govern the global economy.

But over on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley, men still do more risk-taking.

Read more
It's All Politics
4:10 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

As Obamacare Deadline Nears, Louisiana Gets Special Attention

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., speaks at an Oct. 2013 news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Landrieu's support for the Affordable Care Act is center stage in her campaign for a fourth Senate term.
Evan Vucci AP

With only four days left before the March 31 enrollment deadline, the White House is kicking into high gear trying to round up more Affordable Care Act enrollees – and Louisiana got special attention Thursday.

Why? Enrollment in the federal healthcare exchange there has lagged behind other states and, perhaps as important, citizens are getting bombarded with anti-ACA ads as Democratic Sen. Mary Landrieu gears up for a tight race in November.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:01 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

How Being Ignored Helped A Woman Discover The Breast Cancer Gene

Mary-Claire King says obscurity gave her the freedom to spend years looking for breast cancer genes.
Mary Levin/University of Washington

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 7:17 am

Back in the 1970s, a geneticist named Mary-Claire King decided she needed to figure out why women in some families were much more likely to get breast cancer.

Read more

Pages