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Politics
3:04 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Hillary Clinton To Announce Candidacy For 2016 Presidential Election

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 5:30 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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World
3:04 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Removing Cuba From U.S. Terrorism List Would Be Mostly 'Symbolic'

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 5:30 pm

NPR's Audie Cornish talks about the history of how Cuba ended up on the state-sponsored terrorism list with William LeoGrande, professor of government at American University and co-author of the book Back Channel to Cuba: The Hidden History of Negotiations between Washington and Havana.

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Around the Nation
3:04 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Fort Hood Purple Heart Ceremony Honors Survivors Of 2009 Shooting

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 5:30 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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World
3:04 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

President Obama, Raul Castro To Share Face Time At Americas Summit

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 5:30 pm

The leaders of all 35 nations in the Western Hemisphere gather for the first time ever this week at the Summit of the Americas. It will be the first to include Cuba, and the first meeting of President Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro, since the U.S. and Cuba decided to normalize relations.

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Politics
3:04 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Week In Politics: Hillary Clinton's Upcoming Announcement, Rand Paul's Remarks

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 5:30 pm

NPR's Melissa Block speaks with political commentators, E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times about Hillary Clinton and Marco Rubio's upcoming announcements for a presidential run and Rand Paul's controversial remarks this week.

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Law
3:04 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Charleston Civil Rights Leaders Point To Gentrification In Racial Justice Debate

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 5:30 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Remembrances
3:04 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Lauren Hill, NCAA Basketball Player Who Battled Cancer, Dies

Mount St. Joseph University women's basketball coach Dan Benjamin spoke at a vigil for Lauren Hill Friday. The 19-year-old freshman died after a battle with brain cancer.
Tana Weingartner WVXU

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:53 pm

Lauren Hill, a 19-year-old freshman basketball player at Mount St. Joseph University who inspired many to live life to the fullest, died Friday from brain cancer. Her nonprofit foundation helped to raise more than $1.5 million for cancer research.

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The Salt
1:57 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Lunch, Not Landfill: Nonprofit Rescues Produce Rejected At U.S. Border

Yolanda Soto runs Borderlands Food Bank in Nogales, Ariz. Each year, the nonprofit rescues millions of pounds of nutritious and safe fruits and vegetables rejected near the U.S. border and redirects them to needy families across America.
Lisa Morehouse for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 9:07 am

Just across the border from Nogales, Ariz., rows of northbound trucks line up for inspection. Over half of the produce that's grown in Mexico and imported — $4 billion worth — comes through this border crossing. Most gets distributed to all parts of the U.S. and Canada, but some fruits and vegetables get rejected before they leave the city of Nogales.

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Shots - Health News
8:40 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Bundle Of Joyful Microbes: Mom's DNA Alters Baby's Gut Bacteria

During the first year of life, a baby's gut will become home to about 1,000 species of bacteria.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 6:35 pm

Right after birth, trillions of microbes rush into a baby's gut and start to grow. Most of these critters come from the mom's skin, birth canal and gut.

But exactly which types of bacteria take up residence in an infant's gut can depend on the mother's DNA, scientists reported Thursday.

The study, published in the journal Microbiome, focuses on a microbe called Bifidobacterium that potentially benefits babies.

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NPR History Dept.
8:33 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Defeating Polio, The Disease That Paralyzed America

A nurse prepares children for a polio vaccine shot as part of citywide testing of the vaccine on elementary school students in Pittsburgh in 1954.
Bettmann/CORBIS

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 6:57 am

Tens of thousands of Americans — in the first half of the 20th century — were stricken by poliomyelitis. Polio, as it's known, is a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

The hallmarks of the Polio Era were children on crutches and in iron lungs, shuttered swimming pools, theaters warning moviegoers to not sit too close to one another.

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Around the Nation
3:07 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Fort Hood Casualties To Receive Purple Heart In Friday's Ceremony

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 5:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:07 am
Fri April 10, 2015

S.C. Shooting: Isolated Incident Or Symptom Of Bigger Problems?

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 1:12 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Code Switch
8:16 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Civilians Can Record Police Encounters, But When Is It Interference?

Cellphones were used to record a 2012 confrontation between protesters and police in Springfield, Ill.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 12:50 pm

The arrest of South Carolina police Officer Michael Slager, who shot and killed Walter Scott in North Charleston this week, came shortly after the release of a cellphone video recorded by an eyewitness.

The filming of police by civilians has also sparked controversy, and it often causes confusion about what is legal.

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Code Switch
6:51 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Who Gets To Dance In 'Swan Lake'? The Answer Is Changing

Misty Copeland (left) and Brooklyn Mack play Odette/Odile and Prince Siegfried in this year's Washington Ballet production of Swan Lake. It is the first time that two black dancers star in Swan Lake in a major American production.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 9:47 am

Something rare is happening in the world of ballet: At the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., two African-American dancers will be the leads in The Washington Ballet's production of Swan Lake. Misty Copeland, soloist with American Ballet Theatre, will dance the dual role of Odette and Odile, while Brooklyn Mack of The Washington Ballet will dance Prince Siegfried.

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The Two-Way
6:24 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Security Guard Dies After Being Shot At U.S. Census Bureau In Maryland

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 11:15 pm

Updated: 1 a.m. ET Friday:

A spokeswoman for Prince George's Hospital Center says Lawrence Buckner, the security guard at the U.S.Census Bureau headquarters in Suitland, Md., died at the hospital at 7:19 p.m. Thursday.

The Associated Press reports: An armed man kidnapped a woman, shot the guard at the Census Bureau campus and led police on a car chase through Maryland and Washington, D.C., before he was captured. Authorities cornered him in an exchange of gunfire that left the suspect and a police officer wounded.

Original Post:

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All Tech Considered
4:55 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

More Black, Latino Teens Say They're Online 'Almost Constantly'

About one-third of black and Hispanic teens say they're online just about all the time, compared with about 1 in 5 whites, a new study says.
27 Studios/Getty Images

Boys like Facebook, girls like Instagram. Wealthier kids Snapchat. Lower income kids Facebook. And somehow Google+ is still relevant.

So says the Pew Research Center's latest study, "Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015," in which we officially learn that teenagers spend as much time online as adults think they do:

  • 92 percent of teens report going online daily.
  • 24 percent say they go online "almost constantly."
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The Two-Way
4:27 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

S.C. Dashcam Video: A Broken Tail Light, A Routine Traffic Stop, A Fleeing Man

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 4:37 pm

Dashcam video released by the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division shows a routine traffic stop by Officer Michael Slager in North Charleston that eventually resulted in Walter Scott, 50, running from the vehicle.

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Around the Nation
4:11 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

On Welfare? Don't Use The Money For Movies, Say Kansas Lawmakers

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 6:09 pm

Welfare recipients in Kansas may soon be barred from spending their benefits on activities like going to the movies or swimming, or from withdrawing more than $25 per day from bank machines.

If Gov. Sam Brownback signs the bill, it will become one of the strictest welfare laws in the country. It's one of a number of such measures popping up in states that say they're trying to reduce fraud and get people off the welfare rolls. But opponents say the laws are mean-spirited and hurt the poor.

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The Two-Way
3:59 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Biden Says ISIS 'No Longer On The Move' In Iraq

Vice President Biden delivers remarks on U.S. policy in Iraq at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C., on Thursday.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 4:34 pm

Vice President Joe Biden says that the self-proclaimed Islamic State is no longer on the move in Iraq.

"The jury's still out, but the momentum is in the right direction," Biden said in a speech at National Defense University in Washington, in advance of a visit next week by Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi.

Biden laid out the destructive path of ISIS — also called ISIL — citing the collapse of the Iraqi Army, the fall of Mosul and the "slaughter" and "ethnic cleansing" that followed.

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Politics
3:26 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

U.S. Intervention In The Caribbean Comes On China's Heels

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 8:16 pm

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Margaret Myers, director of the China and Latin America program at the Inter-American Dialogue, about China's involvement in the Caribbean. Over the past few years, the Chinese have financed infrastructure projects like new roads and cricket stadiums.

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Law
3:23 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Charleston NAACP President Calls For Police Department Reforms

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 8:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Politics
2:30 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

In Jamaica, Obama Announces Plan To Diversify Caribbean Energy

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 8:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Salt
1:55 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Is It Time For A Warning Label On Sugar-Loaded Drinks?

A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates.
California Center for Public Health Advocacy

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 3:15 pm

We've said it before, and we'll say it again: We consume a lot more sugar than is good for our health. Because of this, the next generation of Americans will struggle with obesity and diabetes more than any other. The most obvious culprit is the added sugar in sodas and other sugary beverages, like sports drinks or teas.

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Thu April 9, 2015

A Classic Prep For Parenthood, But Is The Egg All It's Cracked Up To Be?

Egg babies created by Aaron Warren's ninth-grade students at Orthopaedic Hospital Medical Magnet High School in Los Angeles.
Courtesy of Aaron Warren

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 1:40 pm

For the series Tools of the Trade we've been thinking a lot about the iconic tools that some of us remember using — if only for a short time — in our early schooling.

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The Two-Way
4:52 am
Thu April 9, 2015

Secret Service Supervisor Put On Leave After Assault Accusation

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 5:51 pm

A senior manager is on leave from the Secret Service, after an employee he supervised reportedly told investigators that he assaulted her by making forceful and unwelcome sexual advances.

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Around the Nation
3:08 am
Thu April 9, 2015

Video Of Officer Shooting Man In The Back Astonishes S.C. Residents

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 3:11 pm

Copyright 2015 Georgia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit http://www.gpb.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A second video may be released today showing more of what happened when a white police officer in South Carolina shot and killed a black man who was running away.

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Thu April 9, 2015

California Works Out Details Of Mandatory Water Restrictions

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 5:34 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
1:30 am
Thu April 9, 2015

Doctors Make House Calls On Tablets Carried By Houston Firefighters

Houston firefighters learn to use a video chat program that will let them consult with an emergency medicine doctor while responding to 911 calls.
Courtesy of Houston Fire Department

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 6:58 am

It seems like every firefighter you ask can rattle off examples of 911 calls that didn't come even close to being life-threatening.

"A spider bite that's two or three weeks old," says Jeff Jacobs. "A headache, or a laceration," says Ashley Histand.

Alberto Vela remembers another call from a woman who said, "This medicine's not working; now you need to take me to the hospital so I can get a different medication."

Tyler Hooper describes those calls they shouldn't be getting as "anything from simple colds to toothaches, stubbed toes to paper cuts."

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Shots - Health News
4:42 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Sushi Science: A 3-D View Of The Body's Wasabi Receptor

The same nerve receptor that responds to the green paste on your sushi plate is activated by car exhaust, the smoke of a wildfire, tear gas and other chemical irritants.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 5:33 pm

Researchers have discovered the exact structure of the receptor that makes our sensory nerves tingle when we eat sushi garnished with wasabi. And because the "wasabi receptor" is also involved in pain perception, knowing its shape should help pharmaceutical companies develop new drugs to fight pain.

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The Two-Way
4:41 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Icy Traffic Jam On Lake Superior Has 18 Ships Stuck

United States Coast Guard ships break up ice in eastern Lake Superior on Tuesday.
Kenneth Armstrong Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 2:08 pm

Huge ice chunks stacked some 8 feet deep on Lake Superior have left 18 freighters stuck. The U.S. and Canadian Coast Guards have gotten involved, sending Canadian icebreakers and American vessels to help the ships break free from Whitefish Bay.

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