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The National Guard has quietly expanded its fleet of unmanned aircraft in the U.S.

A dozen units scattered across the country now have drone-flying missions, and in some places, the Guard is lobbying to use military drones for missions at home.

In a field on the outskirts of Spokane, Wash., Peter Goldmark points across to a charred, rocky hillside where the Little Spokane fire burned dangerously close to the city limits earlier this month.

Bill Cosby's lawyers, in court filings today, argue the comedian's admission he used Quaaludes in the 1970s does not mean he "admitted to rape."

The lawyers also asked the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania to keep confidential the details of Cosby's 2006 settlement with a Temple University employee who alleged he sexually abused her. The woman wants that settlement unsealed.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has circulated an order to his fellow commissioners on the Federal Communications Commission to approve the $48.5 billion merger between AT&T and DirecTV.

In a statement, Wheeler said the move would bring more competition to the broadband marketplace and benefit consumers.

How Vandalism And Fear Ended Abortion In Northwest Montana

Jul 21, 2015

There has never been a welcome mat for abortion service providers in the Flathead Valley, a vast area that stretches over 5,000 square miles in the northwest corner of Montana. Susan Cahill began providing abortions in 1976 in the first clinic to offer the service in the Flathead.

"But that had an arson fire, and then we rebuilt that," she says. "Then we had the anti-choice people try to arrest me for doing abortions when I wasn't a doctor."

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Five years ago Tuesday, President Obama signed into law the massive overhaul of U.S. financial regulations called Dodd-Frank. But there's still a battle over whether the law has helped stabilize the financial system or whether it has harmed the economy and should be rolled back.

Congress designed Dodd-Frank to fix excesses in financial markets and mortgage lending — excesses that triggered the financial crisis and forced massive bailouts of Wall Street firms.

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The first people to set foot in the Americas apparently came from Siberia during the last ice age.

That's the conventional wisdom.

But now there's evidence from two different studies published this week that the first Americans may have migrated from different places at different times — and earlier than people thought.

The human race has walked or paddled or sailed until it covered the globe. Scientists can trace those migrations from the stuff these people left behind: tools, dwellings or burial grounds.

Changes in how women are screened for cervical cancer mean they're getting Pap tests less often. But that may also mean young women are not getting tested for chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted disease.

As the number of teens and young women getting annual Pap tests declined, so did the number getting screened for chlamydia, according to a study published Monday in Annals of Family Medicine.

Phrases phase in and out of everyday usage. Especially in the global hodgepodge that is American English. Sometimes, however, there are phrases forgotten that perhaps should be sayings salvaged.

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There may be a drought in California, but the Los Angeles Angels had a home game rained out Sunday, their first in 20 years.

They needed to dry the field on Monday, so they called in a helicopter to hover overhead.

The field was blow-dried, but Angels manager Mike Scioscia was unimpressed.

He recalls a youth league game years ago when wet base paths were doused in gasoline and set on fire.

Presuambly the fire went out before the game began.

This summer, Morning Edition is taking you on adventures off the beaten path — trails that transport us to a special, hidden place.

When Rhoda Green and her husband, Robert, moved from Harlem, N.Y., to Charleston, S.C., in the 1970s, the city seemed eerily familiar. They looked around and saw the same street names and architecture as the capital of their homeland, Barbados.

If this isn't an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it's close.

Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids' literacy skill long before they're old enough to begin reading.

When I first read the study in the journal PLOS Biology, two words came to mind: science fiction.

At the State Department in Washington on Monday, Secretary of State John Kerry welcomed Bruno Rodriguez, the foreign minister of Cuba. Later in the day, Kerry sat down with Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep to discuss the U.S.-Cuba relationship, and the pact that recently was negotiated with Iran regarding that nation's nuclear program.

Officials investigating last week's attacks at two military facilities in Chattanooga, Tenn., that killed five service members say they are examining writings believed to be by the Kuwaiti-born attacker.

Just after hosting Cuba's foreign minister at the State Department, Secretary of State John Kerry sat down with NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep to discuss the restoration of diplomatic relations with that country, as well as the status of a nuclear deal with Iran.

Kerry defended the Obama administration's stance on both countries, and said if diplomatic relations with Cuba or a nuclear deal with Iran were scuttled — either by a future president or Congress — it would hurt the U.S.

Advertising is the basic business model of the Internet. It's one reason we can view online content free of charge.

Millions of Web surfers already download software to block ads online, and that number is growing. Soon, Apple could be making mobile ad blocking easier.

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At the State Department in Washington today, Secretary of State John Kerry welcomed Bruno Rodriguez, the foreign minister of Cuba.

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The U.N. Security Council endorsed a historic nuclear deal with Iran on Monday, and it immediately drew complaints from hard-liners in Tehran as well as from lawmakers — particularly Republicans — in the U.S.

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