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Trade War Draws Lines In Congress

Jul 6, 2018

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China, U.S. Plunge Into Trade War

Jul 6, 2018

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The World Cup Quarterfinals

Jul 6, 2018

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And we are down to just six teams left in the World Cup. Today was the start of the quarterfinals. Belgium is through. That's thanks to a 2-1 win over Brazil. France is also on its way to the semis after defeating Uruguay 2-nil.

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Smack in the middle of the Florida peninsula, Lake Okeechobee, one of the largest lakes in the U.S., has a nagging problem. Nearly every year now, large blooms of algae form in the lake.

On a recent visit, even Steve Davis, a senior ecologist with the Everglades Foundation, was surprised.

"Oh my gosh," he exclaimed, "look how thick this blue-green mat is right here."

The National Security Rationale

Jul 6, 2018

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Updated 10:20 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is asking a federal judge for an extension of the deadline set to reunify all of the migrant parents who were separated from their children at the U.S.-Mexico border.

In a court hearing Friday, U.S. District Judge Dana M. Sabraw delayed until at least Monday any decision on the government's request and he ordered the government to provide a complete list of the reunification status of 101 children under the age of 5 who have been separated from their parents.

People addicted to prescription opioids or heroin are far more likely to have run-ins with the law than those who don't use opioids, according to a study published Friday in JAMA Network Open.

The study provides the first nationwide estimate for the number of people using opioids who end up in the American criminal justice system. The results suggest a need to engage law enforcement officials and corrections systems to tackle the opioid epidemic.

James Alex Fields Jr., 21, pleaded not guilty Thursday to dozens of federal hate crimes in connection with last summer's car attack on people protesting a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.

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Vicki Bartholomew started a support group for wives who are caring for a husband with Alzheimer's disease because she needed that sort of group herself.

They meet every month in a conference room at a new memory care facility in Nashville, Tenn., called Abe's Garden, where Bartholomew's husband was one of the first residents — a Vietnam veteran and prominent attorney in Nashville.

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A few days ago, we reported that the U.S. tried to deport a Chinese immigrant who had joined the U.S. military. The government then called it a mistake and reversed it.

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The internal White House debate over who should replace Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court reflects the broader political split within the Republican Party — and the mistrust that is nursed by outside-the-Beltway social conservatives about the more establishment and business-oriented wing of the party.

So it is perhaps no surprise that a quintessentially Washingtonian fight has erupted between the supporters of the two leading candidates for the nomination, Judge Brett Kavanaugh and Judge Amy Coney Barrett.

For Yemeni nationals currently living in the U.S., Thursday has brought a measure of solace: The Trump administration said it will be renewing the program that for years has shielded them from deportation if they meet certain conditions.

The designation known as temporary protected status, or TPS, has applied to people from Yemen since September 2015, when it was instituted "due to ongoing armed conflict in the country." Currently, the program covers about 1,250 Yemenis who pay hundreds of dollars to re-up their permits every 18 months.

President Trump tried to put some heat on Democratic Sen. Jon Tester of Montana Thursday, campaigning alongside Tester's GOP rival, Matt Rosendale. But as the temperature in Great Falls approached 90 degrees, Tester kept his cool.

"It's time to retire liberal Democrat Jon Tester," Trump told a crowd of more than 6,000 supporters at the Four Seasons Arena.

In the lead-up to Independence Day, Oregon state Rep. Janelle Bynum — a black woman — was out canvassing her constituents in Clackamas, as she is up for re-election this fall.

But according to Bynum, her door-to-door stops raised alarm bells for someone, who called the police.

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We're now going to turn to Myron Ebell. He led Donald Trump's EPA transition team, and he's on the line with us now. Thank you for joining us.

MYRON EBELL: Thank you, Ailsa.

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Joining us now for more is former EPA chief Christine Todd Whitman. She served in the role under President George W. Bush. Welcome.

CHRISTINE TODD WHITMAN: Ailsa, glad to be with you.

The Trump administration's practice of separating children from their parents at the border is not just heartbreaking to other immigrants but also terrifying. Even immigrants who are in the country legally are beginning to worry that their families could be broken apart, too.

The anti-immigrant threats and actions have many Hispanic Americans in particular living on edge.

Tears immediately start streaming down the cheeks of Sarah, a Mexican immigrant, when she is asked about watching recent news stories on TV.

For years, a U.S. Postal Service stamp mistakenly bore the image of a Lady Liberty replica.

That statue welcomes visitors to the New York-New York Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, and between 2010 and 2014, it earned the Postal Service over $70 million in profits.

Last week, Las Vegas sculptor Robert Davidson was awarded $3.5 million from the Postal Service in a lawsuit.

The confusion started a decade ago, when the Postal Service decided to update its line of "forever" stamps with an image featuring Lady Liberty.

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Pompeo Heads To North Korea

Jul 5, 2018

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Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar says that the government will meet deadlines imposed by a federal judge to reunite migrant families that have been separated by the U.S. government.

At the same time, he criticized the deadlines as "artificial" and said that they could prevent the government "from completing our standard — or even a truncated — vetting process."

The Trump administration's separation policy has been met with widespread outcry, marches and legal action.

Sixteen-year-old drivers get in a fair number of car crashes.

But most of them don't look like this.

A young man in southwestern Minnesota found himself in a pickle when he drove straight into a gaping chasm in the road before him. As seen in video published by the local sheriff's office, the accident left the car sticking into the air, nearly vertical.

For many people, the dog days of July mean grabbing an ice pop, lounging outside, and letting the summer sun hit your skin. And for people of color, we're often doing those things sans sunscreen. After all, our melanin will protect us. Right?

Not so fast.

This week on Ask Code Switch we're taking on a question from Liz Mitchell, from New York. She writes:

"Dear Code Switch,

At Florida's Capitol in Tallahassee, four times a year, dozens of anxious people gather to hear a decision that will affect the rest of their lives. Felons whose sentences and probation are complete stand before the governor and other Cabinet members to ask for clemency and the restoration of their right to vote.

After waiting for years, Joanne Calvarese made her case to the clemency board in June.

"I feel that I have paid my consequences," Calvarese said. "I know I don't deserve your mercy, but I beg you for it."

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