U.S. News

Law
2:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Tulsa Reserve Cop Turns Himself In After Accidentally Killing Unarmed Suspect

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 5:45 pm

In Tulsa, Okla., a volunteer sheriff's deputy turned himself in Tuesday morning for manslaughter. The man says he accidentally discharged his handgun rather than his Taser in the course of an arrest, killing an unarmed suspect.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
2:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Hillary Clinton Kicks Off Presidential Campaign With First Events In Iowa

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 3:48 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
1:45 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

No Rest For Your Sleeping Brain

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 12:12 pm

There's new evidence that the brain's activity during sleep isn't random. And the findings could help explain why the brain consumes so much energy even when it appears to be resting.

"There is something that's going on in a very structured manner during rest and during sleep," says Stanford neurologist Dr. Josef Parvizi, "and that will, of course, require energy consumption."

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NPR Ed
10:00 am
Tue April 14, 2015

If Walls Could Talk: What Lead Is Doing To Our Students

Peeling lead paint in a New York City apartment. Many buildings built before 1960 still have high amounts of lead.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 12:04 pm

Every child's ability to succeed in school is influenced by lots of external factors: teacher quality, parenting, poverty, geography, to name a few. But far less attention has been paid to the power of a child's bedroom walls. Or, rather, the paint that's on them and the lead that may be in that paint.

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Around the Nation
2:18 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Year After Denying Federal Control, Bundy Still Runs His Bit Of Nevada

Rancher Cliven Bundy holds his 5-month-old grandson Roper Cox on Saturday in Bunkerville, Nev. Bundy was hosting an event to mark one year since the Bureau of Land Management's failed attempt to collect his cattle.
John Locher AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 12:50 pm

It's been a year since Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy and his militia supporters stood down federal agents with the Bureau of Land Management outside Las Vegas.

Bundy owes more than $1 million in delinquent cattle grazing fees and penalties, but the BLM has stayed quiet in the year since the showdown, and Bundy's supporters marked the anniversary by throwing a party.

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News
2:15 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Church Ceremonies Push North Dakota Town To Grapple With Gay Rights

Diane Gira (left) and Valerie Nelson (right) pose with their son, Madison, in their home near Wahpeton, N.D.
Maggie Penman NPR

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:10 am

This week, Morning Edition is taking a look at the attitudes about gay rights in North Dakota, one of 13 states that still ban same-sex marriage.

Sixteen years ago, in the small town of Wahpeton, N.D., a United Methodist pastor refused to baptize a baby raised by lesbian parents. The pastor said because the child had lesbian parents, there was no way he could get a Christian upbringing. In response, the child's mothers, Valerie Nelson and Diane Gira, left the church.

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The Two-Way
6:24 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Airplane Makes Emergency Landing After Worker Trapped in Cargo Hold

In a statement posted to its blog, Alaska Airlines said that Flight 448, traveling from Seattle to Los Angeles, returned to Seattle-Tacoma International after being in the air for just 14 minutes. Alaska Airlines said "immediately after takeoff" the pilot "reported hearing banging from beneath the aircraft."

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Law
3:16 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Ex-Blackwater Guards Sentenced For 2007 Shooting In Iraq

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 11:42 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
3:15 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Blackwater Security Guards Handed Lengthy Sentences For Iraqi Killings

Former Blackwater security guards were sentenced Monday for the shooting of dozens of Iraqi civilians in Nisour Square in Baghdad, Iraq. The square is seen here on Sept. 20, 2007, four days after the incident.
Khalid Mohammed AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 6:53 pm

Four former Blackwater Worldwide security guards have been handed decades-long sentences, ending a case stemming from the deadly shootings of dozens of Iraqi civilians in 2007.

Three of the guards — Paul Slough, Evan Liberty and Dustin Heard — were each handed down 30-year sentences for voluntary and attempted manslaughter. Nicholas Slatten was sentenced to life in prison for first-degree murder.

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Sports
3:13 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Jordan Spieth's Masters Win Signifies Bright Future For American Golf

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 5:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Environment
3:11 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Harvard Students Block Campus Building To Push Fossil Fuel Divestment

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 12:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Student activists are demonstrating in Harvard Yard, demanding that the world's wealthiest university sell its shares in big oil and coal companies. From member station WGBH, Kirk Carapezza reports.

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Law
3:11 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Sentencing Begins For Atlanta Teachers Convicted In Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 5:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
3:11 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Senators To Review Bill Designed To Limit Iran Nuclear Deal

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 5:53 pm

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee will review a bill Tuesday that intends to give Congress a voice on the Iran nuclear agreement. The bill would take away the president's power to lift sanctions on Iran for 60 days after an agreement is reached, so Congress would have time to review it.

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Politics
3:11 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

After Years Of GOP Support, Cuban-Americans Become More Democratic

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 5:53 pm

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Guillermo Grenier, a sociology professor at Florida International University, about the likelihood that Cuban Americans will support a Republican candidate with a hard line towards softening U.S. relations with Cuba. He is leading a multi-year survey tracking the political attitudes of Cuban Americans.

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NPR Ed
2:04 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Senators Try To Revise No Child Left Behind — A Few Years Behind

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the ESEA in 1965 with Kate Deadrich Loney, his first schoolteacher.
Yoichi Okamoto LBJ Presidential Library

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 5:53 pm

News flash: Members of the U.S. Senate will work across party lines Tuesday for the sake of America's students.

Well, at least for a few more days.

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Shots - Health News
9:52 am
Mon April 13, 2015

I Learned The Hard Way That Concussion Isn't Just For The Young

Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 12:11 pm

I think I knew what was happening even before my head bounced off the hard kitchen counter on its way to the even harder stone floor. I was rapidly losing my connection with reality. My wife, Tabitha, later estimated that I was out for 10 minutes. When I emerged from unconsciousness I heard the sirens on the street in front of the house. It seemed as if half of Tucson's fire department was streaming through the front door.

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Around the Nation
1:32 am
Mon April 13, 2015

What We Talk About When We Talk About Gay Marriage

The small town of Wahpeton, N.D., is one of the places where conversations on same-sex marriage are playing out in schools, churches and families.
Maggie Penman NPR

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 8:27 am

This week, Morning Edition is taking a look at the attitudes about gay rights in North Dakota, one of 13 states that still bans same-sex marriage.

Wahpeton, N.D., is about an hourlong drive from Fargo, through vast, empty farmland that's brown and yellow this time of year. It will look very different soon — farmers are already out on their tractors preparing for the planting season.

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Shots - Health News
1:30 am
Mon April 13, 2015

Why Some Doctors Hesitate To Screen Smokers For Lung Cancer

This spiral CT image of the chest shows a large malignant mass (purple) in one lung. A conventional chest X-ray could have missed this tumor, radiologists say.
Medical Body Scans Science Source

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 8:39 pm

In February, Medicare announced that it would pay for an annual lung cancer screening test for certain long-term smokers. Medicare recipients between the ages of 55 and 77 who have smoked the equivalent of a pack a day for 30 years are now eligible for the annual test, known as a spiral CT scan.

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Around the Nation
1:29 am
Mon April 13, 2015

For Some Superstorm Sandy Victims, The Government Wants Its Money Back

Liz Treston received thousands of dollars from FEMA and the Small Business Administration after Superstorm Sandy destroyed her basement. Two years later, FEMA demanded more than $4,000 of that money back.
Alex Welsh for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 11:28 am

As the rain and wind swirled outside the window during Superstorm Sandy more than two years ago, Liz Treston's family helped her into bed.

Treston, 54, was disabled in a diving accident when she was in her 20s. She uses a wheelchair to get around her Long Island, N.Y., home and an electronic lift machine to get into her bed. The night the storm hit, she wanted to be ready for sleep in case the power went out.

Under the covers, she listened as water rushed into her basement, pouring over the appliances and furniture she kept down there.

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It's All Politics
8:29 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

Clinton Announces Presidential Campaign, Hops In A Van To Iowa

A replica of "The Mystery Machine" van used in the Scooby Doo cartoon series parked at the L.A. Festival of Books in 2012. Hillary Clinton is traveling to Iowa in a van she calls her "Scooby" van.
Doug Kline flickr/Creative Commons

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 2:01 pm

At around the same time that Hillary Clinton's campaign team in Brooklyn, N.Y., was hitting "send" on the emails and tweets that officially launched Clinton's presidential campaign, the former first lady was hitting the road — in a van.

Clinton was scheduled to be in Iowa on Tuesday, but instead of flying, she decided she wanted to pack up a van — which she refers to as the "Scooby" van because of its resemblance to the van from the Scooby Doo cartoon — and chat with people along the way.

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National Security
3:25 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

Before The NSA, The DEA Used Phone Records To Track Drug Cartels

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:52 am

NPR's Arun Rath speaks with USA Today reporter Brad Heath about how the Drug Enforcement Administration collected the records of billions of American telephone calls. The program began in 1992 and pre-dated a similar surveillance program at the National Security Agency.

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Politics
3:25 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

Presidential Announcements Offer Insight Into How Candidates Run

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 4:43 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

Hillary Clinton formally announced her run for the White House today online.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO, "GETTING STARTED")

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Right now, I'm applying for jobs.

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Poetry
3:25 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

I Saw The All-Stars Of Our Generation Honor Allen Ginsberg's 'Howl'

Poet Allen Ginsberg reads his poem "Howl" outside the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., Oct. 19, 1994, before a hearing on the constitutionality of a FCC policy restricting indecent material.
Dennis Cook AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 1:05 pm

Sixty years ago in San Francisco, Allen Ginsberg penned a poem that opened with the now-famous lines:

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked,
dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix ...

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History
3:25 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

Discovery Gives New Ending To A Death At The Civil War's Close

An engraving depicts Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's surrender to Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Appomattox, Va.
Library Of Congress

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 6:02 pm

For decades, the story of Hannah Reynolds' death read like a tragedy of historical circumstance.

In 1865, Reynolds was a slave in the household of Samuel Coleman in the Virginia village of Appomattox Court House. And as Union and Confederate troops fought the Battle of Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, a cannonball tore through the Coleman house.

The Coleman family had left the day before, but Reynolds had stayed behind. The cannonball struck her in the arm and, it was thought, she died that same day, as the battle's only civilian casualty.

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The Two-Way
1:44 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

It's Official: Hillary Clinton Announces Presidential Run

Hillary Clinton announces her candidacy.
Hillary Clinton campaign

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 2:26 pm

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced today that she is seeking the Democratic presidential nomination for the 2016 election.

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It's All Politics
1:34 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

Hillary Clinton, Polarizing Or Misunderstood, Jumps Into Race For President

Hillary Clinton has described herself as the most famous person you don't really know. And as she launches into her second presidential campaign, she'll be reintroducing herself to voters who largely think they have her figured out.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 2:14 pm

Hillary Clinton officially launched the campaign everyone has been expecting for months — years, really. She's running for president and to finally break open that glass ceiling she famously said her last campaign put "18 million cracks" in.

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All Tech Considered
7:22 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Once The Cream Of The Crop, Zynga Zigzags To Adapt To Mobile

Zynga CEO Mark Pincus gives a presentation in 2011.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 9:01 am

Remember those days of tending rows of virtual soybeans and strawberries on your Facebook page with a game called Farmville? It was a moment, and Zynga, the company that makes the game, cashed in when it went public back in 2011.

Now, Zynga is losing money and its founder is back, to mixed reviews.

When Zynga launched Farmville in 2009, it surprised everyone with its success. It quickly became the most popular game on Facebook.

But people got bored with planting seeds on a desktop. The market had moved to mobile, and Zynga didn't keep up.

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Around the Nation
7:02 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Better Than 'Survivor': Wild Drama Hooks Viewers On Nest Web Cams

One of the two female ospreys that scuffled over the male on the Boulder County, Colo., nest web cam.
Boulder County

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:37 am

Fans of Boulder County's osprey nest cam saw a bit of drama last season.

Two females and a male were living in the nest, when a third female arrived and kicked the original female out. Observers said she bonded with the male.

"People called it ... the 'home-wrecker osprey,' " says Nik Brockman, Boulder County's web specialist.

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Politics
5:25 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Clinton To Roll Out Her Campaign On The Small Stage

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 9:01 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Salt
5:25 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Beyond Almonds: A Rogue's Gallery of Guzzlers In California's Drought

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 3:54 am

California is parched. Wells are running dry. Vegetable fields have been left fallow and lawns are dying. There must be some villain behind all this, right?

Of course there is. In fact, have your pick. As a public service, The Salt is bringing you several of the leading candidates. They have been nominated by widely respected national publications and interest groups.

There's just one problem: Not all of these shady characters live up to their nefarious job description. Let us explain.

1. Almonds

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