U.S. News

Law
2:21 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

The Curious Practice Of Bringing Immigrants Back — To Deport Them

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 9:06 pm

U.S. officers at the ports of entry are arresting undocumented immigrants as they try to leave the U.S. They're then prosecuted and sent to prison, only to be removed from the U.S. anyway. Why bother? That's a question people on all sides of the immigration debate are asking.

News
2:21 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Obama Administration Opens Review Of Its Deportation Policy

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 9:06 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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News
2:21 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Obama Raises Curtain On 4-Country East Asia Trip

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 9:06 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. President Obama has arrived in Japan on a weeklong trip that will also include stops in South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines. Along with trade talk, President Obama will be trying to reassure leaders that the U.S. will not abandon them. That's important because China is becoming more assertive in disputes with its neighbors.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports on the Obama administration's efforts.

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Law
2:21 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Justice Dept. Opens Door To Freedom For Some Nonviolent Offenders

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 9:06 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Justice Department wants to grant an early release to thousands of nonviolent drug offenders in crowded federal prisons and they've unveiled a plan to do it. Inmates will receive notice starting next week that they may be eligible to apply. That has government lawyers gearing up for a huge amount of work. Here's NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Deputy Attorney General Jim Cole says there's no time to waste.

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Law
2:21 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Under Calif. Law With Teeth, Big-Time Lawsuits Hit Small Businesses

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 7:46 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

The Americans with Disabilities Act requires equal access to stores, offices and public places all over the country. It's a federal law. But more than 40 percent of all ADA lawsuits are filed in California, because in California the law has some extra teeth. People who sue there can get cash damages from a business that is not ADA compliant.

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The Two-Way
5:42 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Stowaway Teen May Have Been Trying To Reunite With His Mom

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 5:58 am

The latest word about the teenager who survived a ride Sunday from California to Hawaii in the frigid wheel well of a jet is that he may have hoped to eventually get to Somalia to be with his mother.

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U.S.
5:38 am
Wed April 23, 2014

In Illinois, A Town That's Half-Destroyed But Filled With Hope

Washington, Ill., is full of both optimistic signs and lots of construction crews as the town rebuilds after a half-mile-wide tornado devastated the area in November.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 1:12 pm

Washington is just starting to rebuild.

Much of the central Illinois town was wiped away by a half-mile-wide tornado in November. In all, 1,108 homes were destroyed or rendered uninhabitable — a huge share of the housing stock in a city of 15,000.

"Early on, people were asking me how long it was going to take to rebuild the city, and I said we'll do it in a year," says Mayor Gary Manier. "That was wishful thinking."

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Education
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

In Tulsa, Combining Preschool With Help For Parents

Shartara Wallace picks up her son James, 4, from preschool in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 9:00 am

At preschools in Tulsa, Okla., teachers are well-educated and well-paid, and classrooms are focused on play, but are still challenging. One nonprofit in Tulsa, the Community Action Project, has flipped the script on preschool. The idea behind its Career Advance program is simple: To help kids, the group believes, you often have to help their parents.

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Around the Nation
2:30 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Race To Unearth Civil War-Era Artifacts Before Developer Digs In

Archaeologist Chester DePratter stands by the site of Camp Asylum, a Civil War-era prison, in Columbia, S.C. The site will soon be cleared to make room for a mixed-use development.
Susanne Schafer AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 7:52 am

About a dozen archaeologists in downtown Columbia, S.C., are focused on a 165-acre sliver of land that was a prisoner of war camp during the Civil War. Last summer, the property was sold, and the group is trying to recover artifacts before a developer builds condos and shops there.

"We're out here to salvage what we can in advance of that development," says Chester DePratter, a University of South Carolina archaeologist. Time is running out: DePratter and his team have a permit to excavate until April 30.

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Law
2:29 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Citizen Volunteers Arm Themselves Against Crime In Rural Oregon

An old police car is permanently parked on the highway through O'Brien, Ore., where cuts to the sheriff's office have prompted some locals to mount crime patrols.
Jeff Barnard AP

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 11:10 am

It's after 10 p.m. as Sam Nichols slowly cruises through the tiny town of O'Brien, Ore., shining superbright spotlights into the shadows.

"We're just checking this commercial building here, just to make sure there's no one hiding around it or anything," Nichols says.

Nichols' King Cab pickup has a yellow flasher on top and signs on the doors identifying it as a Citizens Against Crime patrol. Riding with Nichols is fellow volunteer Alan Cress.

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The Two-Way
6:30 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Obama Tours Mudslide Devastation, Pledges Solidarity With Families

Marine One, carrying President Obama, takes an aerial tour of Oso, Wash., on Tuesday. The president made a brief stop in the area devastated by last month's mudslide.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 10:06 am

President Obama, aboard Marine One, took an aerial tour of devastation caused by a massive mudslide a month ago that left at least 41 people dead near the town of Oso, Wash.

The president, who made a stop in the state on his way to Japan for the start of a four-stop visit to Asia, witnessed toppled trees, mud and debris from the March 22 landslide.

"We're going to be strong right alongside you," Obama promised the people of Oso on Tuesday.

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Law
5:40 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Supreme Court Gives Police New Power To Rely On Anonymous Tips

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that police can stop and search a driver based solely on an anonymous 911 tip.

The 5-4 decision split the court's two most conservative justices, with Justice Clarence Thomas writing for the majority and Justice Antonin Scalia penning the dissent.

In August 2008, an anonymous 911 caller in California phoned in a report that a pickup truck had run her off the road. The caller gave the location of the incident, plus the make and model of the truck and the license plate number.

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It's All Politics
4:18 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Green GOP Group Caught Between 'Rock And A Hard Place'

Volunteer Tom Strain carries debris from an empty lot as part of an Earth Day cleanup effort in Camden, N.J. The Earth Day events celebrated on April 22 promote a sustainable and clean environment.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 5:11 pm

On Earth Day 2014, it wasn't easy being green in the Republican Party. Just ask Rob Sisson, president of ConservAmerica.

ConservAmerica is a membership organization created in 1995 to keep the environmental spirit of GOP President Theodore Roosevelt alive in his party. Back then, the group was known as Republicans for Environmental Protection.

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The Two-Way
3:24 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Soldier Speaks Up A Decade After Pat Tillman's Friendly-Fire Death

Pat Tillman, in a 2003 photo provided by Photography Plus. Tillman was killed in a friendly-fire incident in Afghanistan on April 22, 2004.
AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 5:31 pm

Ten years after the friendly-fire incident in Afghanistan that killed U.S. Army Ranger and former NFL star Pat Tillman, one of the soldiers who mistakenly pulled the trigger says he's still haunted by demons from the night of April 22, 2004.

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Shots - Health News
2:48 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Hospitals Can Speed Stroke Treatment, But It's Not Easy

Turning the standard ambulance into a specialized stroke treatment unit could help.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 7:08 am

When a patient who has had a stroke enters the emergency room, it's a race against the clock.

Those who receive the clotbusting drug tPA within 60 minutes of experiencing stroke symptoms have the best chance of avoiding brain damage or death, but studies show that only 30 percent of patients eligible for treatment with the drug get it within this "golden hour."

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The Salt
2:20 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Fast-Food CEOs Earn Supersize Salaries; Workers Earn Small Potatoes

According to a new report, YUM! (owner of KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut) compensated its CEO $22 million in 2013.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 7:09 am

At a time when fast-food workers make an average of about $9 an hour, what are the chief executives bringing home?

According to a new report, YUM! (owner of KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut) compensated its CEO $22 million in 2013.

Chipotle's CEO took home $13.8 million in total compensation. And McDonald's CEO compensation totaled $7.7 million. (Compensation includes salary, bonus and the value of exercised options.)

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Shots - Health News
2:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

FDA Advisers Vote Against Approving New Opioid Painkiller

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 7:50 pm

A key government panel Tuesday voted unanimously against approval of a powerful opioid prescription painkiller intended to provide faster relief with fewer side effects.

At the conclusion of a hearing, the Food and Drug Administration advisory committee voted 14-0 against recommending that the agency approve Moxduo, the first drug to combine morphine and oxycodone into one capsule.

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Law
2:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

High Court Upholds Michigan's Affirmative Action Ban

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette speaks to reporters after arguing the case before the U.S. Supreme Court in October. He's with XIV Foundation CEO Jennifer Gratz, who was a plaintiff in a lawsuit against the University of Michigan's affirmative action policy.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 4:38 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld a Michigan ban on affirmative action in higher education. The 6-to-2 decision is likely to set the stage for further battles over affirmative action in the political arena, as well as the courts.

In 2006, Michigan voters, by a margin of 58 percent to 42 percent, passed a referendum to amend the state Constitution and ban any consideration of race in college and university admissions. A federal appeals court invalidated the ban, citing earlier Supreme Court decisions that prevented restructuring government to disadvantage minorities.

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The Impact of War
2:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Ex-Ranger Recalls The Friendly Fire That Killed Pat Tillman

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 4:38 pm

Ten years ago Tuesday, former NFL star Pat Tillman was killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan. Steven Elliott was one of the Army Rangers who fired on Tillman, and he told his story recently on ESPN's Outside the Lines.

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All Tech Considered
2:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Online Sales Taxes Shift Consumer Behavior, Study Shows

Monica Chavez packs up a box at an Amazon.com fulfillment center Dec. 2, in Phoenix.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 3:34 pm

Technically, consumers are supposed to pay taxes on things they buy online. In fact, few do.

Congress is considering a bill called the Marketplace Fairness Act that would force many online sellers to collect sales taxes for the first time.

In the meantime, some states have already enacted so-called Amazon taxes, forcing the giant online retailer to collect sales taxes the same way traditional brick-and-mortar stores do.

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Education
2:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Who's Getting Preschool Right? Researchers Point To Tulsa

Preschool student Stormy Frazier watches a science experiment unfold in Nikki Jones' classroom in Tulsa, Okla. You can learn more about preschool in Tulsa here.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 4:38 pm

Many educators say quality early childhood education programs give young children a strong foundation for kindergarten and beyond.

But what does a high-quality preschool program look like? Early childhood education researchers point to Tulsa, Okla., as a school system that gets it right. NPR's education team went to Tulsa to find out what help sets the city's preschool program apart. You can read more about what they found — and visit a Tulsa preschool classroom, here.

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Technology
2:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

The Wonders Of The Year 2014, As Told By Isaac Asimov

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 4:38 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

A moment now remember how the future looked 50 years ago today.

(SOUNDBITE OF DOCUMENTARY, "FUTURAMA")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Welcome to a journey into the future, a journey for everyone today, into the everywhere of tomorrow.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

On this date in 1964, the New York World's Fair opened. It offered visions of a better future, much of it based on technology. A popular exhibit was this one: General Motors' "Futurama."

(SOUNDBITE OF DOCUMENTARY, "FUTURAMA")

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National Security
1:30 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Army Vs. National Guard: Who Gets Those Apache Helicopters?

An airborne Apache attack helicopter takes off above a Black Hawk helicopter from the South Carolina Army National Guard base in Eastover, S.C., in 2007. The Army is planning to move all the National Guard's Apache helicopters to the regular Army, a move opposed by many in the Guard.
Mary Ann Chastain AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 4:38 pm

For decades the National Guard has fought hard against the stereotype that it was the place to avoid the draft during the Vietnam War, or that it's a place to get college money rather than combat duty.

Guard leaders thought that after more than a decade of war in Afghanistan and Iraq they had finally earned some respect. So it was a body blow when the Army's top officer, Gen. Ray Odierno, unveiled his plan on Capitol Hill to take all of the National Guard's Apache helicopters and move them to the regular Army.

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The Salt
12:20 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

We Didn't Believe In 'Artisanal' Toast, Until We Made Our Own

Fire-roasted toast will satisfy the smoke fiends at the breakfast table.
Eliza Barclay/NPR

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 7:10 am

Leave it to San Francisco to turn one of the simplest — and cheapest — dishes into the trendy snack du jour.

We're talking about toast.

"Artisanal" toast is made from inch-thick, snow-white or grainy slices, lathered in butter and cinnamon or peanut butter and honey, then wrapped individually in wax paper.

And you think that latte is expensive. Each one of these slices will set you back at least $3.50.

The toast craze started at an unlikely location: a modest coffee shop, called Trouble, about four blocks from San Francisco's sleepy Ocean Beach.

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Law
10:36 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Rethinking Punishment For Drug Offenders

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Now we'd like to turn to a story about how views of crime and justice are changing when it comes to the nation's drug laws. In the 1980s and '90s during the crack epidemic, many low-level offenders received harsh sentences that kept thousands of people incarcerated sometimes for decades. But the Obama administration has been re-examining the wisdom of those sentences and is pushing to open up the clemency process for nonviolent drug offenders.

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The Two-Way
5:10 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Wheel Well Stowaway Was 'Runaway Kid With A Bad Idea'

Hawaiian Airlines Flight 45 after its arrival on Monday at Maui's Kahului Airport. After the same flight landed on Sunday, a California teen emerged from the left rear wheel well.
Oskar Garcia AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:20 am

The California teenager who survived a 5 1/2 hour flight to Hawaii in the wheel well of a Boeing 767 was "just a runaway kid with a bad idea," FBI Special Agent Tom Simon says.

Simon also says, according to The San Jose Mercury News, that the unidentified boy's lousy idea wasn't very well thought out: "He ran for the nearest plane. This was not a well-planned thing."

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Education
3:03 am
Tue April 22, 2014

For Early Childhood Education, Tulsa, Okla., Stands Out

Preschool students from Nikki Jones's class at Porter Early Childhood Development Center in Tulsa line up in the hallway on their way back from outside play.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 7:54 am

The federal government spends almost $8 billion on preschool programs across the country, mostly on low income 4-year-olds. States spend billions more. But with at least 30 states planning to expand access to pre-K and President Obama promoting "preschool for all," what constitutes a quality preschool program?

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Around the Nation
3:00 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Obama To See Effects Of Deadly Mudslide In Oso, Washington

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And on his way to Asia, the president will make a stop in Washington state. There, he will view the destruction from a massive landslide north of Seattle in the town of Oso. Obama will meet with those affected by that disaster and first responders. It was a month ago that the hillside gave way and wiped out a rural neighborhood. Crews have been looking for the remains of victims ever since. The official death toll now stands at 41. NPR's Martin Kaste visited the site, and has this update.

(SOUNDBITE OF CONSTRUCTION)

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The Two-Way
4:05 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Alaska OKs Bill Making Native Languages Official

Just before Alaska's Senate voted to make 20 Alaska Native languages official state languages alongside English, Rep. Charisse Millett (seated) held hands with Liz Medicine Crow. Left of them is Rep. Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins, who introduced the bill.
Skip Gray Gavel Alaska/KTOO

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 7:44 pm

If you're so inclined, and able, you could soon speak Tlingit, Inupiaq, or Siberian Yupik in Alaska with the knowledge that those and 18 other languages, including English, are officially recognized by the state. Alaska's Legislature approved a bill giving them that status Monday.

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The Two-Way
3:52 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

U.S. Marshal Fatally Shoots Defendant In Utah Courtroom

Siale Angilau, 25, an accused street gang member, in a picture provided by the Utah Department of Corrections. Angilau was fatally shot in federal court in Salt Lake City by a U.S. marshal on Monday.
HANDOUT Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 4:31 pm

An alleged gang member appearing in court in Utah was shot dead by a U.S. marshal on Monday after he reportedly lunged at a witness.

Deseret News says 25-year-old Siale Angilau, aka "C-Down," was on trial in federal court in Salt Lake City when the fatal shooting took place.

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