U.S. News

News
2:21 pm
Fri May 2, 2014

Amid New Details Of Botched Execution, A Timeline Of Final Hours

Originally published on Sat May 3, 2014 9:17 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Oklahoma has released new details about the botched execution this week of convicted murderer Clayton Lockett. It took 43 minutes for Lockett to die, and his death came from a heart attack after the execution was halted. In a moment, we'll hear about how lethal injection became the standard method of execution in the U.S. First, here's NPR's Greg Allen with the latest on Oklahoma's investigation into what went wrong.

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The Salt
1:05 pm
Fri May 2, 2014

Urban Greengrocers Are Back, To Serve Big-Spending Locavores

Each Peach Market in Washington, D.C., is one of a growing breed of small, urban greengrocers.
Maanvi Singh NPR

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 8:32 am

Each Peach Market in Washington, D.C., is a far cry from the Trader Joe's where I usually shop. For one thing, it's tiny — smaller than the apartment I share with two others. And there are no lines snaking through aisles and aisles of tempting goods.

You'll find the usual staples here, and also artisanal pickles, locally grown and cured charcuterie, and yogurt from Pennsylvania's Amish country. But don't expect much selection — there are just two brands of olive oil, rather than the several shelves to choose from at Harris Teeter.

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Shots - Health News
12:44 pm
Fri May 2, 2014

Don't Count On Travel Insurance To Cover Mental Health

That ticket might not be worth much if you have to cancel the trip due to a mental health issue.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 12:10 pm

It's bad enough to be sick at home in your own bed, but so much worse when on vacation.

People often buy travel insurance so they don't lose the money they spent on airfare and hotels if they can't travel due to illness. But if that illness happens to be a mental health issue, don't expect travel insurance to cover it.

And since mental health problems are so common, that means that a lot of people may be left holding the bag.

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Paying For College
10:23 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Tough Lessons On Debt For College Students

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 2:49 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This spring, we joined our colleagues at Morning Edition for a series called Paying for College. It's exactly what it sounds like. We're trying to figure out how people are navigating the college money maze.

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U.S.
1:45 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Cinco De Mayo: Whose Holiday Is It, Anyway?

Members of Dance Academy of Mexico perform during last year's Cinco de Mayo celebrations in Milwaukee.
Rick Wood Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/MCT/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 9:38 am

Across the country this weekend, Cinco de Mayo will be celebrated with festivals, music, Mexican food and plenty of bar specials.

But south of the border, the holiday merits little more than a parade in the city of Puebla, east of Mexico City. There, in 1862, outgunned Mexican troops defeated an invading French army.

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Politics
6:32 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

When College Sexual Assault Panels Fall Short, And When They Help

Dartmouth College is one of 55 colleges and universities on the Education Department's list of institutions being investigated for how they've handled sexual assault cases.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 8:45 am

Thursday, the federal government sent a message that it's taking sexual harassment on college campuses seriously. Education officials released the names of 55 schools facing investigation for their handling of sexual abuse allegations.

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Shots - Health News
3:35 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Doctors Think The Other Guy Often Prescribes Unnecessary Care

She ordered the test, not me.
iStockphoto

Three out of four physicians believe that fellow doctors prescribe an unnecessary test or procedure at least once a week, a survey released Thursday finds.

The most frequent reasons that physicians order extraneous — and costly --medical care are fears of being sued, impulses to be extra careful and desires to reassure themselves about their assessments of patients, the survey said.

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The Two-Way
2:44 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Ending 5-Year Dispute, New York Reaches Deal With Teachers Union

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 3:25 pm

New York has reached a deal with its teachers union, ending a five-year stalemate, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Thursday.

The New York Times reports de Blasio, a liberal Democrat taking on a tough issue during his first year in office, called it a "landmark" labor deal. The Times adds:

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Around the Nation
2:37 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

After The Floods, Gulf Coast Towns Dig Out From Muck And Mud

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 7:02 pm

The Florida panhandle and the coast of Alabama have been deluged by rain this week. Some local officials say it's the worst flooding in decades. Sandra Averhart of Pensacola's WUWF sent this postcard.

Europe
2:13 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

In Shadow Of Ukraine, A Return To Rivalry Between NATO And Russia

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:32 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We have to begin to view Russia no longer as a power but as more of an adversary - those are the words today of Alexander Vershbow, the deputy secretary-general of NATO. We, in this case, means NATO, and few people are as experienced when he is when it comes to the alliance and the Russians. Before becoming the number two man at NATO, he was U.S. ambassador to the alliance and then U.S. ambassador to Russia. And he joins us now. Alexander Vershbow, welcome to the program.

ALEXANDER VERSHBOW: Good to be here.

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Middle East
2:13 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

In Rubble Of Middle East Peace Talks, Kerry Seeks Way Forward

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:32 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is a challenging time for Secretary of State John Kerry. His Middle East peace process has collapsed. He's also taking a lot of heat for suggesting that Israel could become an apartheid state if it doesn't negotiate with the Palestinians on two states for two peoples. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports on how Kerry is trying to dig out.

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News
2:13 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

In Sex Assault Report, Pentagon Sees Progress — And A Long Way To Go

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:32 pm

The Pentagon issued a study on sexual assaults in the military, reports of which have jumped 50 percent in the past year. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says this is a positive sign that more victims trust the system.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Politics
2:13 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Effort To Force Treatment On Severely Mentally Ill Meets Resistance

Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa., speaks during a December 2013 news conference in Washington to discuss the introduction of a legislative package of major mental health reforms.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:32 pm

Ed Kelley and his wife have three children. They live in a comfortable suburb of Baltimore. And for a long time their life seemed perfect.

"We were churchgoing; we were involved in the community. We had a very close-knit family all around us."

And he adored his 14-year-old son.

"He was funny, he was getting good grades, he loved playing sports; he was so humorous. Actually for the longest time he was sort of the center of the family."

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The Two-Way
11:33 am
Thu May 1, 2014

55 Colleges, Universities Under Investigation For Abuse Claims

People tour the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., in 2012. Harvard was one of 55 institutions on the Education Department's newly released list.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 2:26 pm

The Department of Education has released a list of 55 colleges and universities facing investigation under Title IX for their handling of sexual abuse claims.

Releasing the list is described as an unprecedented move. NPR's Brian Naylor says the list "starts at Arizona State University and ends at the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine."

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Shots - Health News
10:29 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Love That Gel Nail Polish, But Know It Doesn't Come Risk-Free

Dermatologists say women should use sunscreen and sunglasses to protect themselves from the ultraviolet light used to cure gel nail polish.
Claude Donne iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 7:34 am

Just last week a friend told me about a gel polish manicure that stayed flawless through two weeks of mucking out stables and dish washing. Since I'm lucky if I get through a day without ruining polish, this seemed like a technological breakthrough.

Then I saw a report in Wednesday's JAMA Dermatology investigating whether the ultraviolet light used to dry gel nails causes skin cancer. I decided I'd better find out a bit more before I paint.

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Race
9:36 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Black Colleges Face State Funding Crunch

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 10:27 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Today is a big day for many students around the country. This is the final day for those high school seniors lucky enough to have a choice to make their final decisions about which college or university they will attend.

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The Protojournalist
9:29 am
Thu May 1, 2014

The State Department Is 'Deeply Concerned'

Then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testifying before the Senate Appropriations Committee in 2010.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 9:14 am

Considering the month of April alone, the State Department said it was "deeply concerned" about each of these situations: justice in Turkey; peaceful challenges of official Chinese policies; restrictions of freedom in Egypt; a Ugandan raid on a U.S.-funded medical facility; the humanitarian crisis in Burma and certain actions of the Republika Srpska, among other various and diverse issues — many extremely serious.

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The Two-Way
5:40 am
Thu May 1, 2014

2 Feet Of Rain Causes Massive Flooding In Florida, Alabama

Michael Harrell of J&J Towing attaches a tow cable to a car that was swept off the road by torrential rains in Pensacola, Fla., on Wednesday.
GM Andrews AP

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 11:14 am

Extreme rainfall in much of the East and parts of the South is causing major problems, with Florida's Panhandle and southern Alabama — which got more than 2 feet of rain in 24 hours — bearing the brunt of the onslaught.

The torrential rains followed close on the heels of a rash of deadly tornadoes that battered a broad swath of the country earlier this week, killing dozens of people.

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The Two-Way
4:27 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Explosion At Florida Jail Kills 2, Injures Dozens Of Inmates

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 2:10 pm

An apparent gas explosion at a jail in Pensacola, Fla., has killed at least two inmates and injured more than 100 people, including some corrections officers, according to local reports. But it's not clear yet whether the incident at the Escambia County Jail has anything to do with the extensive flooding in the region.

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Around the Nation
3:11 am
Thu May 1, 2014

D.C. Metro Combats Sexual Harassment, Urges Riders To Speak Up

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 7:37 am

Sexual harassment is a chronic problem for transit systems, and it's consistently underreported. Metro transit officials have kicked off a serious effort to fight harassment on buses and trains.

Around the Nation
3:11 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Torrential Rains Latest Severe Weather To Strike The South

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 7:35 am

After days of storms that dropped massive amounts of rain on the South, floods are sweeping across the Florida Panhandle and the Alabama Gulf Coast.

U.S.
4:23 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

States Struggle To Find An Execution Method That Works

The gurney in the execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary is pictured in McAlester, Okla., in 2008. Legal pressures and concerns from European manufacturers have made traditional execution drugs unavailable to states.
AP

States have always struggled to find humane ways to carry out the death penalty. For a generation, they have favored lethal injection, but that method has become increasingly problematic.

It's coming under increased scrutiny following the death of Clayton Lockett, who died Tuesday of a heart attack after writhing visibly during an execution attempt in Oklahoma.

The execution "fell short" of humane standards, White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters on Wednesday.

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It's All Politics
4:06 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Nino's No-No: Justice Scalia Flubs Dissent In Pollution Case

Whether the error in Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's recent dissent was originally his fault or a clerk's doesn't make it less cringeworthy.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 5:28 pm

All of us who write for a living know what it's like to completely forget something you wrote 13 years ago.

But when a Supreme Court justice pointedly cites the facts in a decision he wrote, and gets them exactly wrong, it is more than embarrassing. It makes for headlines among the legal cognoscenti.

I'm not sure I rank as one of the cognoscenti, but here's my headline for Justice Antonin Scalia's booboo: "Nino's No-No."

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NPR News Investigations
3:57 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Campus Rape Reports Are Up, And Assaults Aren't The Only Reason

After the University of Michigan increased its efforts to prevent sexual assaults on campus, reports increased by 113 percent.
Erin/Flickr

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 5:04 pm

The number of "forcible rapes" that get reported at four-year colleges increased 49 percent between 2008 and 2012. That's the finding of an analysis by NPR's Investigative Unit of data from the Department of Education.

That increase shows that sexual assault is a persistent and ugly problem on college campuses. But there's also a way to look at the rise in reports and see something positive: It means more students are willing to come forward and report this underreported crime.

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All Tech Considered
3:07 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

High-Tech Maker Spaces: Helping Little Startups Make It Big

A member works in the electronics lab at NextFab Studios in Philadelphia. Members pay for access to computers and high-end machines like laser cutters and 3-D printers.
Jon Kalish

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 3:20 pm

Around the country, there are lots of tinkerers working on what they hope will be the next brilliant idea — but who don't have the tools in their garage to build it.

In dozens of cities, those innovators can set up shop in a "maker space" — community workshops where members have access to sophisticated tools and expertise.

Maker spaces have become hotbeds of technological innovation and entrepreneurship. Now, governments, universities and big corporations are taking notice — and beginning to invest in them.

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The Salt
3:06 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Renegade Cider Makers Get Funky To Cope With Apple Shortage

Nat West, owner of Reverend Nat's Hard Cider in Portland, Ore., uses sweet apples to make cider, and gives it an extra kick with ginger juice, herbal tonics, coffee and hops.
Courtesy of Reverend Nat's Hard Cider

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 8:31 am

For centuries, hard apple cider has been made with the fermented juice of apples — nothing more, nothing less. And a lot of cider drinkers and makers — let's call them purists — like it that way.

But a new wave of renegade cider makers in America is shirking tradition and adding unusual ingredients to the fermentation tank — from chocolate and tropical fruit juices to herbs, chili peppers and unusual yeasts. Their aim — which is controversial among the purists — is to bring out the best, or just the weirdest, flavors in the ciders.

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Politics
2:53 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Minimum Wage Raise: Blocked For Now, May Live Again In Campaigns

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 9:20 pm

Senate Republicans blocked a vote Wednesday on a bill to raise the nation's minimum wage. But don't expect that to be the end of the story.

For more than a year now, Democrats, including President Obama, have been pushing to boost the minimum wage. Their latest target is $10.10 an hour.

GOP critics argue that would depress hiring in an already weak job market.

But raising the wage is popular with voters, and Democrats plan to make the issue a rallying cry between now and the November elections.

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Education
2:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

U.S. Tests Teens A Lot, But Worldwide, Exam Stakes Are Higher

Students in Manchester, England, celebrate the results of their college entrance exams.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 5:06 pm

High school students in the U.S. take lots of standardized tests. There are state tests, new Common Core-aligned field tests, and an alphabet soup of others like the PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) and NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress) exams, the SAT, ACT, AP and IB.

It's a lot by any objective measure. Parents and teens often charge that America tests its students more than any other nation in the world. But really, how does the U.S.'s test tally compare with what kids are taking elsewhere in the world?

England

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News
2:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Botched Oklahoma Execution Mobilizes Death Penalty Opponents

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 4:18 pm

Oklahoma death row inmate Clayton Lockett's execution was botched on Tuesday, when a relatively new combination of drugs failed to work as expected. The incident, the second of its kind in recent months, is renewing questions of what constitutes "cruel and unusual punishment."

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Science
2:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Facing Execution Drug Shortage, States Struggle To Get Cocktail Right

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 4:18 pm

A botched execution in Oklahoma is only the latest issue since states started having trouble obtaining the drugs used to execute inmates. They've been trying new combinations and new drugs, which often had never been used before for that purpose.

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