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A federal judge in Florida has decided that the National Rifle Association cannot use pseudonyms for teenagers who want to buy guns as part of a legal challenge against new gun laws in Florida.

The judge expressed sympathy for the teenagers, acknowledging that they probably would suffer extreme harassment if their names were public. But, he wrote with evident reluctance, the law was clear that pseudonyms were not allowed.

The Supreme Court handed down five decisions Monday, and one that could pave a path for legalizing sports gambling throughout the country got most of the attention Monday morning. But the court also decided two important criminal justice and personal rights cases.

In one, McCoy v. Louisiana, the court ruled 6-3 in favor of a defendant whose lawyer told a jury that his client was guilty, disregarding the explicit instructions of his client. His lawyer wanted him to plead guilty to avoid the death penalty.

Last week, teachers-to-be WinnieHope Mamboleo and Cristina Chase Lane marched across the graduation stage at North Carolina State University.

This week, they'll be marching with future colleagues at the state capitol in Raleigh, asking for better pay and better school funding.

North Carolina is the sixth state to see teacher walkouts in the past four months. The others are West Virginia, Oklahoma, Kentucky, Colorado and Arizona. The Tar Heel state ranks 39th both in per-student spending and in average teacher pay as of 2017.

Thousands of low-wage workers, faith leaders and civil rights advocates are expected to descend on more than 30 state capitals and Washington, D.C. today to relaunch a fight against poverty, war and income inequality that first took root half a century ago.

The original 1968 Poor People's Campaign was a multicultural, multi-faith coalition planned by Martin Luther King. It brought thousands of Americans living in poverty to the national mall to demand better living conditions and higher wages.

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In St. Louis this week, Missouri Governor Eric Greitens goes to trial on charges of felony invasion of privacy. St. Louis Public Radio's Jason Rosenbaum reports.

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President Trump's lawyer, Michael Cohen, was in the spotlight this past week after AT&T confirmed it paid him more than half a million dollars for advice about the administration.

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And now to our correspondent Peter Kenyon in Jerusalem, where thousands of people celebrated Jerusalem Day today. It's a national holiday marking the unification of the city under Israeli rule following the 1967 war.

Hello, Peter.

New fissures have opened on Hawaii's Big Island as earthquakes continue to rock the island, and scientists are warning about further volcanic eruptions.

Officials announced the island's 17th fissure on Saturday evening, hours after a 16th fissure emerged, releasing lava that traveled 250 yards before settling. That fissure opened near the Puna Geothermal Venture plant, where officials have removed 60,000 gallons of flammable liquid as a precaution.

A shallow earthquake, with a magnitude of 3.5, also hit the island on Saturday.

In Hawaii, worry continues to grow after two new fissures opened up on Hawaii's Big Island Saturday. Scientists are warning about a possible volcanic eruption.

The events are spewing toxic gases and steam. Lava has swallowed up roads and homes and thousands living near Kilauea volcano have been evacuated.

President Trump's goal of achieving "energy dominance" for the United States includes producing more oil and gas on federal land, but new government statistics show a mixed record on this front during his first year in office.

Trump has cast himself as an ally of fossil fuel industries. At a 2017 event he told energy industry leaders, "You've gone through eight years of hell," referring to the time former President Obama was in office.

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In an exclusive interview with NPR this past week, President Trump's chief of staff, John Kelly, said this about immigrants crossing the border illegally.

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Fifty years ago today, a mule train left the small town of Marks, Miss., bound for the nation's capital. They were answering a call to action the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. made just days before he was assassinated.

"We're coming to Washington in a poor people's campaign," King announced at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., on March 31, 1968. "I was in Marks, Miss., the other day, which is in Quitman County, the poorest county in the United States. And I tell you I saw hundreds of black boys and black girls walking the streets with no shoes to wear."

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Fraternity Culture And Racism

May 12, 2018

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The U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons released revisions to its Transgender Offender Manual on Friday. Notably, the rewritten manual gets rid of language asking that an inmate's gender identity, not the sex they were assigned at birth, be considered when recommending a housing facility for them.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin managed to anger both gun-rights and LGBTQ-rights activists late Friday with two separate actions.

In a rare blow to the National Rifle Association, Fallin vetoed a bill that would have loosened gun laws in the conservative state. Had it passed, SB 1212 would have allowed gun owners to carry a firearm — either open or concealed, loaded or unloaded — without a state license or permit. About a dozen states have passed similar so-called "constitutional carry" laws.

February's mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., which left 17 dead and 17 more wounded, horrified people across the country, spurring student walkouts and marches in support of stricter gun control laws, including universal, comprehensive background checks and a ban on assault weapons. But gun debates in the United States have proven to be contentious and intractable.

Here at NPR Ed, we write a lot about four-year colleges and universities. But we know there are many other paths to degrees and jobs.

Are you heading to a career or technical program to prepare for a job? Or are you working toward an associate's degree or a certificate?

Maybe you're forgoing a degree entirely for an apprenticeship program.

We want to hear about your choice — and how you decided.

The $1 Fentanyl Drug Test

May 12, 2018

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Pansy Greene is one of 5.7 million Americans who have Alzheimer's disease. She and her husband Winston call her illness part of their "journey" together.

A Busy Time For Migrating Birds

May 12, 2018

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Late spring is graduation season for schools across the United States. It's a time of joy and hope for many, but for DACA recipients and their families it can bring added anxiety. For many of these "DREAMers," the threat of deportation looms over their graduation celebrations.

NPR's Scott Simon spoke with Jessica Moreno-Caycho, a DREAMer graduating this May from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Moreno-Caycho said she came with her family to the United States from Peru in 2003. She was 8 years old when she arrived.

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