U.S. News

Code Switch
1:16 am
Fri March 20, 2015

'A Proud Walk': 3 Voices On The March From Selma To Montgomery

Demonstrators of different races and religions from across the country united to take part in the historic march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., 50 years ago.
AP

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 2:39 pm

Fifty years ago, civil rights protesters began their successful march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., two weeks after a crackdown by police at the Edmund Pettus Bridge on Bloody Sunday. NPR talked with three people from different parts of the country, of different races and religions, who answered the call from Martin Luther King Jr. to join the marchers.

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The Two-Way
6:50 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Report: Army Examines Claims Of Racial Slurs At Alaska Base

The Army is investigating allegations that members of a platoon at Fort Wainwright, Alaska, used racial slurs against one another during what they called "Racial Thursdays," the Army Times is reporting.

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The Two-Way
6:22 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Obama To Iranians: 'Best Opportunity In Decades' For A Different Future

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 11:37 am

President Obama is using a Nowruz message to tell Iranians that "we have the best opportunity in decades to pursue a different future between our countries."

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U.S.
6:19 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Exxon Settlement Falls Short Of Damage, N.J. Democrats Say

Bayway Refinery in Linden, N.J., is one of two refineries that are involved in the settlement. It's no longer owned by Exxon, but they are on the hook for the cleanup.
Joel Rose NPR

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 5:54 am

Lawmakers in New Jersey heard testimony today about one of the biggest environmental cases in that state's history.

ExxonMobil recently agreed to pay $225 million in damages for contamination at two oil refineries. Gov. Chris Christie called it a "good deal." But environmentalists complain the state is getting pennies on the dollar compared to the billions it was seeking in court.

The proposed settlement still requires approval by a state judge, and the public will have a chance to comment once the details are released — probably in the next few weeks.

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The Two-Way
4:59 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Remains Of Sept. 11 Victim Identified

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 6:03 pm

New York City medical examiners have identified the remains of another of the victims of the attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. He is Matthew David Yarnell of New Jersey, a 26-year-old vice president of technology of the Fiduciary Trust Co.

NPR's Hansi Lo Wang tells our Newscast unit that Yarnell worked on the 97th floor of the World Trade Center's south tower. His remains were identified through DNA testing.

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The Salt
4:24 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Watch Your Back, Kale. Kelp Is Gunning For The Veggie Du Jour Title

Alaria, a type of seaweed also known as "Wild Atlantic Wakame," grows in the North Atlantic Ocean and is similar to Japanese wakame, a common ingredient in miso soup.
Courtesy of Sarah Redmond

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 12:47 pm

The story of how kale went from frumpy to trendy is a great inspiration to Gabriela Bradt, a fisheries specialist at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.

"Nobody cared about kale. Then it became the green du jour," says Bradt.

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It's All Politics
3:16 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Obama To Prince Charles: We'll Never Be Royals

Prince Charles, Prince of Wales smiles with President Obama at the White House Thursday.
Chris Jackson Getty Images

President Obama may be having some postcode envy.

As members of the press corps poured into the Oval Office in the White House to get pictures of Obama and Prince Charles, Obama whispered to Charles, "I think it's fair to say that the American people are quite fond of the royal family."

He went on: "They like them much better than they like their own politicians."

Prince Charles, laughing, gave the only polite answer he could in return: "I don't believe that."

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Politics
3:01 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Analysis Reveals Record Number Of FOIA Requests Filed Last Year

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 6:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Science
3:00 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Fossil Collection Calls Berkeley's Clock Tower Home

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 6:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Portland Airport Says Goodbye To Its Beloved Carpet

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 6:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

U.S. Army, International Soldiers Conduct Arctic Training In Alaska

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 6:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sports
3:00 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

100 Issues Of 'Who's Who In Baseball'

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 9:30 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sports
3:00 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Among NCAA Contenders, Belmont University Outsmarts Them All

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 6:19 pm

A private university in Nashville, Tenn., may have one of the smartest teams in this year's NCAA tournament. This is Belmont University's seventh appearance in the tournament, but off the court, they lead the NCAA in academic rankings.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Law
3:00 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Native Americans Face Legal Challenges In Domestic Violence Cases

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 6:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Shots - Health News
1:29 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

'Looks Like Laury' Shines The Power Of Friendship On A Failing Mind

Laury Sacks and her husband, Eric. The actress and writer developed frontotemporal dementia in her late 40s and died in 2008 at age 52.
Courtesy of Eric Sacks

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 6:09 am

More than 5 million Americans have dementia, and that number is only climbing. Each case leaves some people wondering what's left in a friendship when the bond between confidants becomes literally unthinkable, when language and thinking fail. But a good friend can sometimes help in ways that a spouse, a child or a paid professional can't.

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Shots - Health News
10:40 am
Thu March 19, 2015

For A Good Snooze, Take One Melatonin, Add Eye Mask And Earplugs

It's hard to sleep when the light's on and the monitor's beeping.
Roderick Chen Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 1:16 pm

Hospitals are one of the worst places to try to get a good night's sleep, just when you need it the most. And though many have tried to muffle the noise of beeping monitors and clattering carts, the noise remains a big problem for many patients.

But what if we looked at a night in the hospital as a long overseas flight? As you settle in, they hand out eye masks and earplugs. And you cleverly brought along melatonin, the sleep-regulating hormone sold at drugstores everywhere.

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Parallels
7:50 am
Thu March 19, 2015

A Chinese Tourism Boom Has South Koreans Cramming

Language instructor Soh Bor-am teaches eight Mandarin classes a day, as Chinese tourism to South Korea swells.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 7:58 pm

Perhaps nowhere is the growth of the Chinese middle-class more visible than at top tourist destinations, which these days are teeming with Chinese travelers. The Chinese are traveling abroad in numbers never seen before, and it's felt strongly in South Korea, which finds itself scrambling to keep up with an estimated 4 million Chinese tourists a year.

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NPR History Dept.
7:23 am
Thu March 19, 2015

When The KKK Was Mainstream

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 11:44 am

Recently I tumbled on this story from Kansas Humanities — and an earlier post from Only A Game — about a 1925 baseball game between Wichita's African-American team, the Monrovians, and the Ku Klux Klan.

Wait a minute. The Ku Klux Klan once had a baseball team?

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Questions To Ask About Ed-Tech At Your Kids' School

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 11:33 am

When a 4-year-old comes home from pre-K proudly announcing that she spent her "choice time" playing on the computer, what's a parent to do?

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Shots - Health News
1:51 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.S.?

Acids, alcohol and pancreatic tissue were separated, bathed and mixed in this laboratory of a 1946 insulin factory in Bielefeld, Germany.
Chris Ware Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 1:16 pm

Dr. Jeremy Greene sees a lot of patients with diabetes that's out of control.

In fact, he says, sometimes their blood sugar is "so high that you can't even record the number on their glucometer."

Greene, a professor of medicine and history of medicine at Johns Hopkins University, started asking patients at his clinic in Baltimore why they had so much trouble keeping their blood sugar stable. He was shocked by their answer: the high cost of insulin.

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Science
1:35 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Scientists Catch Up On The Sex Life Of Coral To Help Reefs Survive

Staghorn coral planted by scientists in the Florida Keys. Researchers hope to give the same sort of boost to the world's shrinking population of pillar coral, now that they can raise the creatures in a laboratory.
Joe Berg/Way Down Video/Mote

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 5:54 am

For the first time, biologists have caught a rare type of coral in the act of reproducing, and they were able to collect its sperm and eggs and breed the coral in the laboratory.

The success is part of an effort to stem the decline in many types of coral around the world.

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U.S.
1:29 am
Thu March 19, 2015

One Year After Mudslide, First Responders Tackle Emotional Damage

A sign memorializes the devastating mudslide that killed 43 people in Oso, Wash., one year ago.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 5:21 pm

One year ago, a mudslide wreaked havoc on Oso, a small community in Washington state. It took just a few minutes to topple dozens of homes, leaving 43 people dead. Volunteers and first responders rushed to the scene to save trapped residents. Yet, remarkably, none of them were hurt, at least not physically.

In the weeks and months following the landslide, thousands of people from the outlying areas formed teams. Loggers brought in heavy equipment; Red Cross and other groups organized volunteers and protected families from the throngs of media.

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The Two-Way
7:39 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Microsoft Is Phasing Out Internet Explorer

The logo of Microsoft's Internet Explorer, the Web browser due to be phased out in the next version of Windows.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 7:41 am

Clippy will soon get a roommate in Microsoft heaven or hell, depending on your perspective. This week, Microsoft announced that it will phase out Internet Explorer, its much-maligned Web browser, beginning with Windows 10.

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Shots - Health News
6:27 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Blue Shield Of California Loses Exemption From State Taxes

Steve Rhodes/Flickr

California tax authorities have stripped Blue Shield of California, the state's third largest insurer, of its tax-exempt status in California and ordered the firm to file returns dating to 2013, potentially costing the company tens of millions of dollars.

At issue in the unusual case is whether the company is doing anything different from its for-profit competitors to warrant its tax break. As a nonprofit company, Blue Shield is expected to work for the public good in exchange for the exemption from state taxes.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

WATCH: Police Detonate 20,000 Pounds Of Fireworks

Dahboo777 via YouTube

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:23 pm

How long does it take to detonate 20,000 pounds of fireworks? The answer, courtesy of the Midland, Texas, Police Department, is 3 1/2 days.

A court ordered the destruction of the illegal fireworks. The department's bomb squad, along with those from Odessa, Lubbock and Amarillo, assisted the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives in the controlled detonation.

And what does that controlled detonation look like? Here's the answer — in the form of a 48-second video from the department's Facebook page:

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It's All Politics
4:50 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Bad Blood Gets Worse Between Barack, Bibi And Israel

President Obama with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House in 2013. The two have never had a warm and fuzzy relationship.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:22 pm

The U.S.-Israeli relationship was one of the issues in the Israeli elections — in particular Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's poisonous personal relationship with President Obama.

Now, with Netanyahu's return to power, that relationship doesn't look like it will be improving anytime soon.

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It's All Politics
4:49 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Chicago Mayor's Race Reveals Deep Divide In Democratic Party

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel failed to capture a majority of the vote last month, forcing him into a runoff. It's highlighting a divide among Democrats playing out nationally.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:39 pm

One of the nation's savviest politicians is in an unexpected fight.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, President Obama's former White House chief of staff, is in an unprecedented runoff election next month.

The challenger, Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia, contends that Emanuel favors the rich and powerful over working-class Chicagoans. But Emanuel is firing back, attacking Garcia for having no plan to deal with the city's deep financial problems.

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U.S.
4:27 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Record Number Of Inmate Deaths Has Florida Prisons On The Defensive

Latandra Ellington, 36, was serving time for tax fraud at Lowell Correctional Institution when she died.
Florida Department of Corrections

A record number of inmates – 346 people — died behind bars in Florida last year.

Most were from natural causes, but a series of suspicious deaths have raised questions about safety in the prisons. Federal and state law enforcement agencies are now investigating why so many inmates have been dying.

Latandra Ellington, 36, was serving time for tax fraud at Lowell Correctional Institution in central Florida when she died. Algarene Jennings, Ellington's aunt, believes she was murdered.

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Around the Nation
3:24 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Sigma Alpha Epsilon Announces Anti-Discrimination Plan

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 4:27 pm

Sigma Alpha Epsilon announced Wednesday a plan to eliminate instances of racial discrimination and insensitivity among its members nationwide. The fraternity's move follows the disbanding of its University of Oklahoma chapter for racially offensive actions.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
3:24 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Penn State Suspends Fraternity After Nude Photos Posted Online

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 4:27 pm

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