U.S. News

Shots - Health News
9:56 am
Fri January 16, 2015

A Weight-Loss Device Aims To Curb Hunger By Zapping A Nerve

Electrical impulses generated by a pacemaker-like device are transmitted to the vagus nerve by electrodes.
Enteromedics

What if you could zap your hunger away? A device approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday promises to do just that.

The VBLOC vagal blocking device, developed by EnteroMedics of St. Paul, Minn., generates an electrical pulse in the vagus nerve, perhaps blocking communication between the brain and stomach. Normally, the nerve helps tell the brain whether the stomach is empty or full, among many other tasks.

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NPR Story
5:59 am
Fri January 16, 2015

Released From Prison After 22 Years, But Still 'Locked Up'

Tyrone Hood at his niece's home in Dolton, Ill., on Wednesday. He was among dozens of clemency requests granted by Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn on his last day in office.
Bill Healy for NPR

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 10:40 am

After more than 20 years in prison, Tyrone Hood is out.

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn granted 43 requests for clemency on his final day in office, and Hood's case was one of them.

He had been in prison for murder for 22 years, despite serious doubts about his guilt — and strong evidence pointing to another perpetrator.

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Around the Nation
4:25 am
Fri January 16, 2015

Milwaukee Group Teaches Protesters Civil Disobedience Tactics

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 5:59 am

Copyright 2015 Milwaukee Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wuwm.com/.

Around the Nation
4:14 am
Fri January 16, 2015

Oklahoma Executes 1st Inmate Since Lethal Injection Problems

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 12:22 pm

Copyright 2015 KOSU-FM. To see more, visit http://www.kosu.org.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Around the Nation
1:24 am
Fri January 16, 2015

NYPD Disciplinary Problems Linked To A 'Failure Of Accountability'

New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton attends a press conference after witnessing police being retrained under new guidelines at the Police Academy on Dec. 4.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 8:22 am

The New York Police Department is known for pioneering the use of computer statistics to identify crime trends, but it can't seem to identify its own officers causing problems on its streets.

Darvell Elliott was arrested in August 2010 because he matched the description of a robbery suspect. He says he was already in handcuffs when the world went black.

When he came to, he was "in a hospital, Brookdale Hospital, face stuck to the sheet like Velcro," Elliott says.

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Shots - Health News
1:23 am
Fri January 16, 2015

By Making A Game Out Of Rejection, A Man Conquers Fear

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 5:56 am

Fear is one of the strongest and most basic of human emotions, and it's the focus of Fearless, the second episode of Invisibilia, NPR's new show on the invisible forces that shape human behavior.

This segment of the show explores how a man decided to conquer his fear of rejection by getting rejected every day — on purpose.

The evolution of Jason Comely, a freelance IT guy from Cambridge, Ontario, began one sad night several years ago.

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The Two-Way
7:25 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Oklahoma Executes An Inmate For 1st Time Since Lethal Injection Disaster

The gurney in the the execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary is pictured in McAlester, Okla. Oklahoma resumed executions Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, after botching its last one.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 7:24 am

More than eight months after Oklahoma officials struggled to perform the execution of a condemned man who eventually died of a heart attack, the state executed another prisoner, Charles Frederick Warner, Thursday night. The Associated Press reports that Warner was declared dead at 7:28 p.m. CST. Warner was convicted in the 1997 rape and beating death of an 11-month-old girl.

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The Two-Way
5:57 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Pizza Delivery Driver Won't Be Fired For Shooting Robbery Suspect

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 5:41 am

A Papa John's pizza delivery driver who says she shot a would-be robber in the face will not be fired, despite her violation of the company's policy against employees carrying guns. Instead, the employee will be reassigned to work inside a store.

The shooting occurred in the Atlanta area Sunday night, when the driver was making a delivery that police now suspect was a setup for a carjacking and robbery.

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The Two-Way
4:20 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Public Sales Of Google Glass To End Later This Month

Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears Google's Project Glass prototype publicly for the first time while attending a charity function in San Francisco. Google is suspending public sales of its first generation of Google Glass next week.
Corbett Lee AP

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 5:42 am

Google Glass Phase 1 is officially over. The Google Glass team posted a statement with the news to Google+ today. But the announcement says that Glass is not dead, it's just going through a "transition," and that the Google Glass team is "continuing to build for the future." The first, "Explorer," version of Glass was, according to the team, an "open beta" version, or basically a big, public test of the new product. The team didn't give a timeline for future versions.

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The Two-Way
4:13 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

After Saying Yes, Duke Nixes Muslim Call To Prayer From Chapel Bell Tower

Duke University Chapel
IPS Lerner UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 10:53 am

Duke University announced this week it would allow the traditional Muslim call to prayer from the Duke Chapel bell tower. The reaction from some Christian groups was angry, and today the private university in Durham, N.C., reversed course.

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NPR Ed
3:42 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Do Fictional Geniuses Hold Back Real Women?

Geniuses in movies aren't always played by Benedict Cumberbatch, but they are almost always men.
Weinstein Co./Studiocanal/Kobal Collection

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 6:39 am

The "Lone Genius" character is hot right now in television and movies. Sometimes the genius is real (think Benedict Cumberbatch in The Imitation Game), and sometimes he's fictional (think Benedict Cumberbatch in Sherlock). But one thing is almost always certain: He's a guy.

Now one researcher says that gender stereotype in art may have a real impact on women in academia.

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Shots - Health News
3:20 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Limited Insurance Choices Frustrate Patients In California

Dennie and Kathy Wright sift through a stack of medical bills at their home in Indian Valley, Calif.
Pauline Bartolone for NPR

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 6:39 pm

Dennie Wright lives in Indian Valley, a tiny alpine community at the northern end of the Sierra, close to the border with Nevada.

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Around the Nation
2:46 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Yosemite Dawn Wall Climbers Reach The Top After 19 Days

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 4:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Latin America
2:46 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

White House Starts Chipping Away At U.S. Embargo On Cuba

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 4:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
2:46 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Largest Unit Of Gambling Giant Caesars Files For Bankruptcy

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 4:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Iraq
2:46 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Hundreds Of U.S. Military Trainers Headed For Iraq

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 4:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Science
12:51 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Highflying Geese Save Energy By Swooping Like A Roller Coaster

Bar-headed geese after a molt, hobnobbing in Mongolia.
Charles Bishop Science

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 5:59 am

The bar-headed goose is famous for its long, annual migration from the Indian subcontinent to central Asia, a flight that takes it over snowcapped Himalaya Mountains so high and dangerous that human climbers struggle just to stay alive.

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Shots - Health News
11:42 am
Thu January 15, 2015

This Year's Flu Vaccine Is Pretty Wimpy, But Can Still Help

Bruno Mbango Enyaka gets his flu shot at a community health center in Portland, Maine, on Jan. 7.
Gabe Souza Press Herald via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 5:21 pm

As expected, this year's flu vaccine looks like it's pretty much of a dud.

The vaccine only appears to cut the chances that someone will end up sick with the flu by 23 percent, according to the first estimate of the vaccine's effectiveness by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Shots - Health News
11:22 am
Thu January 15, 2015

Why I Left The ER To Run Baltimore's Health Department

Dr. Leana Wen became Baltimore's health commissioner on Thursday.
Mark Dennis City of Baltimore

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 6:56 am

When I was just beginning my third year as a medical student, I learned an important lesson about what matters most in health.

It was a typical summer afternoon in St. Louis, with the temperature and humidity both approaching 100. My patient was a woman in her 40s who was being admitted to the hospital because her lungs were filling with fluid, a complication of kidney failure. She had missed all three dialysis appointments that week.

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Code Switch
10:30 am
Thu January 15, 2015

Hawaii As 'Racial Paradise'? Bid For Obama Library Invokes A Complex Past

University of Hawaii students sit together to show the ethnic differences of Hawaii's population in 1948.
Eliot Elisofon The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 1:36 pm

Sometime in March, Barack Obama is expected to announce his choice of the institution that will hold his presidential archive. Vying for the honor (and the money that comes with it) are the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois at Chicago, Columbia University in New York, and the University of Hawaiʻi (the Hawaiian language spelling of the state's name).

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Around the Nation
3:24 am
Thu January 15, 2015

Free-Climbers Reach Summit Of Yosemite's El Capitan

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 9:07 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Back At Base
1:20 am
Thu January 15, 2015

In Remote Washington, Veterans Services Are Ferry Ride Away

The ferry pulls in to Friday Harbor, the only incorporated city in San Juan County, Wash. Veterans will often travel the hourlong ferry ride to reach VA services here.
Patricia Murphy KUOW

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 11:45 am

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This story is part of a three-part series about veteran benefits (Part 1 / Part 2).

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NPR Ed
10:08 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

A New Study Reveals Much About How Parents Really Choose Schools

A painted map of the U.S. seen from inside a classroom at Homer A. Plessy Community School, a charter school in New Orleans.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 7:13 am

The charter school movement is built on the premise that increased competition among schools will sort the wheat from the chaff.

It seems self-evident that parents, empowered by choice, will vote with their feet for academically stronger schools. As the argument goes, the overall effect should be to improve equity as well: Lower-income parents won't have to send their kids to an under-resourced and underperforming school just because it is the closest one to them geographically.

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The Two-Way
6:34 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

After Foie Gras Ban Lifted In California, Some Chefs Face Threats

Karlene Bley of Los Angeles spreads her torchon of foie gras onto bread during lunch at the Presidio Social Club restaurant in San Francisco. Last week, a federal judge overturned California's ban on the dish.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 10:59 am

Last Wednesday, a federal judge overturned California's ban on the sale of foie gras, the delicacy made from the livers of fatty ducks and geese that have often been force-fed. The ban was approved by California voters in 2004, and went into effect in 2012.

Since the ban was overturned, some chefs using foie gras in their menus have been receiving threats.

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The Two-Way
5:35 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

New Solitary Confinement Plan For Younger Inmates At Rikers

A view of buildings on Rikers Island penitentiary complex .
Don Emmert AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 10:33 am

New York City officials unanimously agreed Tuesday to eliminate solitary confinement for inmates ages 21 and younger. The decision is groundbreaking: Jails across the U.S. impose solitary confinement on misbehaving inmates.

In recent years, the Department of Correction has been plagued by accusations of inmate abuse at Rikers Island, the second-largest jail in the U.S. In 2012, the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU) published Boxed In: The True Cost of Extreme Isolation in New York's Prisons, a yearlong investigation.

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Business
4:48 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Dollar's Rise Is Good News For The U.S., For Now

A pedestrian passes a currency exchange in London Jan. 5. The value of the U.S. dollar has risen about 15 percent against the euro since last summer.
Andy Rain EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 6:17 pm

If you've traveled outside the U.S. recently, or sent your U.S.-made products abroad, you've probably noticed that the dollar is getting stronger. The stronger dollar is the sign of a healthier U.S. economy, but its strength has the potential to erode growth.

There are a number of factors behind the dollar's rise, says economist Jens Nordvig, a currency expert at Nomura Securities. The main one is the health of the U.S. economy.

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The Two-Way
3:40 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Ohio Man Is Arrested For Allegedly Plotting Attack On U.S. Capitol

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 4:05 pm

The FBI arrested Christopher Lee Cornell of Cincinnati, charging him with buying weapons to carry out a terrorist attack on Washington, D.C. Cornell, 20, was monitored by federal agents who say he used Twitter to express support for the extremist group Islamic State as well as "violent jihad."

The arrest warrant for Cornell, who authorities say was known online as Raheel Mahrus Ubaydah, says that he "purchased and possessed firearms in furtherance of a plan to shoot and kill United States Government officers and employees."

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U.S.
3:27 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Homeland Security Secretary Defends Executive Actions On Immigration

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 4:33 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Jeh Johnson, secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), about what the effects would be on DHS if Congress did not vote to fund it.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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The Great Plains Oil Rush
3:27 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Falling Oil Prices Have North Dakota Migrants Rethinking The Boom

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 4:33 pm

A year ago, as part of our series on the Great Plains oil rush, we brought you the story of a 36-year-old father who had recently lost his job when one of the last major timber mills in the Northwest shut down. After several years struggling to find steady work and even after going back to school, Rory Richardson decided to commute 550 miles from his home in far western Montana, to a place where jobs are plentiful - the oil fields of North Dakota. But after a little more than a year, he and his family have decided the toll is just too great.

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Law
2:45 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Supreme Court Considers Whether A Sock Is Drug Paraphernalia

In 2010, Moones Mellouli was arrested for driving under the influence and having four Adderall pills in his sock. He was subsequently deported.
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 4:33 pm

At the U. S. Supreme Court Wednesday, the question before the justices boiled down to whether a sock can be considered drug paraphernalia.

Each year 30-35,000 people are deported for drug crimes. But federal law does not treat all drug crimes equally. The question before the justices was whether the government can deport legal permanent residents for minor drug offenses.

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