U.S. News

Shots - Health News
1:33 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Rethinking Alcohol: Can Heavy Drinkers Learn To Cut Back?

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 6:34 am

The thinking about alcohol dependence used to be black and white. There was a belief that there were two kinds of drinkers: alcoholics and everyone else.

"But that dichotomy — yes or no, you have it or you don't — is inadequate," says Dr. John Mariani, who researches substance abuse at Columbia University. He says that the thinking has evolved, and that the field of psychiatry recognizes there's a spectrum.

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The Two-Way
4:59 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

Starbucks Will Stop Putting The Words 'Race Together' On Cups

Larenda Myres holds an iced coffee drink with a "Race Together" sticker on it at a Starbucks store in Seattle. Starbucks baristas will no longer write "Race Together" on customers' cups starting Sunday.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 10:08 pm

The most visible part of Starbucks' campaign to get customers talking about race — putting the slogan "Race Together" on coffee cups — has come to an end.

In a memo sent to all Starbucks employees Sunday, CEO Howard Schultz wrote: "This phase of the effort — writing 'Race Together' (or placing stickers) on cups, which was always just the catalyst for a much broader and longer term conversation — will be completed as originally planned today, March 22."

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U.S.
3:55 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

In New York, Support Grows For Keeping Teens Out Of Adult Prisons

In December, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio met with youth offenders at alternative housing on Rikers Island. A new state proposal would spare teens younger than 18 from serving time in adult prisons.
Susan Watts ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 4:15 pm

When Charles Nuñez was 17 years old, he was arrested in New York for carrying a handgun that he says he was trying to sell in Harlem. As state law requires, he was prosecuted as an adult and sent to Rikers Island, New York City's notorious prison, where he says he was quickly targeted by older men who wanted to steal his boots and his commissary money.

"One night, when we were locking in to go to sleep, some dude just hit me while I was walking toward my cell," Nuñez says. "He basically ... knocked me out, because I, like, blacked out."

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U.S.
3:24 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

A Visit To A Marine Base As Marines Test Whether Women Can Serve In Ground Combat

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 3:03 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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U.S.
3:23 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

Understanding Skid Row's Tensions After A Fatal Police Shooting

Many of LA's Skid Row residents live in makeshift tents.
Kelly McEvers

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 9:15 am

Skid Row, in downtown Los Angeles, has long been known for its high concentration of homeless, drug- or alcohol-addicted and mentally ill residents. They live on the streets, in boxes and tents or in subsidized one-room apartments.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Sun March 22, 2015

ISIS Issues 'Wanted' List Of 100 U.S. Military Personnel

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 8:10 am

The self-declared Islamic State has posted names, photos and what it says are addresses of 100 U.S. military personnel, calling on its supporters to "deal" with them.

The extremist group's so-called "hacking division," says the individuals have been part of efforts to defeat ISIS in Syria, Iraq and Yemen.

It says it has decided to release the information about the U.S. servicemen and servicewomen so "brothers in America can deal with you."

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The Two-Way
6:04 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Ted Cruz Set To Announce Presidential Bid

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz speaks with area business leaders during a Politics and Eggs breakfast, on March 16 in Manchester, N.H.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 5:10 pm

Updated at 9:10 a.m. ET

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz will announce Monday he is running for the Republican nomination for president, a close aide of the lawmaker confirmed to NPR following a report first published by The Houston Chronicle.

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Middle East
6:02 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Gen. Allen: Iran's Involvement Complicates Anti-ISIS Effort

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 7:19 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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U.S.
4:07 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

'I Don't Want Death To Be Such A Downer'

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 12:23 pm

"I don't want death to be such a downer" — that's what Paul Bennett, chief creative officer at the IDEO design firm, told California Sunday writer Jon Mooallem. NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with Mooallem about Bennett's work "redesigning" death.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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U.S.
3:34 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

As Scandals Continue To Hit Fraternities, How Can Misconduct Be Prevented?

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 5:41 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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U.S.
3:33 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

A Year After Deadly Mudslide, Oso Remembers And Heals

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 5:41 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
11:07 am
Sat March 21, 2015

Judge Rules U.S. Must Release Photos Of Prisoner Abuse In Iraq, Afghanistan

A cell block at the now-closed Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad, a facility notorious for photos released in 2004 showing U.S. soldiers torturing and humiliating inmates.
Karim Kadim AP

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 1:51 pm

A U.S. district judge ruled Friday that the U.S. must release photos of American soldiers inflicting abuse on prisoners in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The ruling is a victory for The American Civil Liberties Union, which filed a lawsuit against the government in 2004, seeking the release of the photos. The ACLU claimed the pictures revealed significant human rights violations, specifically at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

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The Two-Way
9:18 am
Sat March 21, 2015

2 Men Convicted In Canada In 2013 Train Derailment Plot

Chiheb Esseghaier, one of two men convicted of plotting a terror attack on passenger train, is led off a plane by an Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer in Toronto in 2013.
Chris Young AP

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 11:17 am

Two men have been found guilty in a court in Canada on terrorism-related charges related to a foiled 2013 plot to derail a passenger train traveling from New York to Toronto.

Raed Jaser, 37, who is of Palestinian descent and Tunisian-born Chiheb Esseghaier, 32, could spend the rest of their lives in prison for the plan, which prosecutors said was motivated by Islamic extremism and guided by members of al-Qaida.

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All Tech Considered
7:58 am
Sat March 21, 2015

A New 3-D Printing Method Is Rising Out Of The Ooze

Continuous Liquid Interface Production, or CLIP, uses liquid resin with ultraviolet light and oxygen projected through it to create more complex structures than those of existing 3-D printers.
Nina Gregory NPR

One of the presentations at the TED Conference in Vancouver this week that had much of the tech elite oohing and ahhing was something called CLIP (no relation to Microsoft's reviled animated helper) or Continuous Liquid Interface Production.

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Business
7:34 am
Sat March 21, 2015

As Americans Eat Healthier, Processed Foods Starting To Spoil

This week Kraft Foods recalled nearly 2.5 million boxes of macaroni and cheese that were potentially contaminated with metal pieces. Kraft and other processed food manufacturers are facing many challenges.
Toby Talbot AP

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 12:24 pm

Kraft Foods is going through a rough patch.

This week, Kraft recalled nearly 2.5 million boxes of macaroni and cheese that were potentially contaminated with metal pieces.

Also, Kraft Singles, a pre-sliced processed cheese product, earned a nutritional seal from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The seal prompted outrage from nutritionists.

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The Two-Way
7:13 am
Sat March 21, 2015

Fire In Brooklyn Home Kills 7 Children

Damage can be seen along an upper floor on the back of a house at the scene of a fire in which seven children died in the Brooklyn borough of New York early Saturday.
Craig Ruttle AP

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 1:17 pm

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

A fire that swept through a home in New York's Brooklyn borough overnight just after midnight has killed seven children and left the mother of at least three of the victims in critical condition, fire officials say.

The dead children range in age from 5 to 15 and they are believed to be siblings, New York Fire Department spokesman Jim Long says.

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Around the Nation
6:18 am
Sat March 21, 2015

The Definitive Road Trip? It's Data-Driven

Randy Olson's algorithm devised the optimal driving route to 50 tourist spots in the Lower 48 states.
Randy Olson

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 8:56 am

Spring is here, and a number of families are plotting road trips for school break.

Randy Olson, a Ph.D. candidate at Michigan State University and a self-proclaimed "data tinkerer," believes he's devised a route that could allow a family to hit a landmark in each of the Lower 48 states, from Grand Canyon in Arizona to the Gateway Arch in St. Louis to the Statue of Liberty in New York, in just nine days of driving.

"About 9.33 days, if you drove non-stop," Olson clarifies.

That means no time sleeping or using the restroom — and no bad traffic.

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The Two-Way
6:08 am
Sat March 21, 2015

Kerry Cites Progress In Iran Talks, Saying Deal Is Possible

Secretary of State John Kerry delivers a statement about the recently concluded round of negotiations with Iran over their nuclear program at the International Olympic Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland, on Saturday.
Brian Snyder Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 11:28 am

Secretary of State John Kerry says there has been "genuine progress" on talks with Iran over its nuclear program, but he has acknowledged that gaps still remain as the negotiations go on a brief hiatus before resuming next week.

Speaking with reporters in Lausanne, Switzerland, where the so-called "P5+1" nations — the U.S., Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany — were meeting to hammer out a deal before the end of the month, Kerry insisted that "we are not rushing" on an agreement.

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Science
5:11 am
Sat March 21, 2015

Why Some Mushrooms Glow In The Dark

N. gardneri mushrooms grow at the base of young babassu palms in Brazil. A bland tan by day, the fungi emit an eerie green light by night.
Michele P. Verderane/IP-USP

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 8:56 am

A team of scientists recently created some fake, glowing mushrooms and scattered them in a Brazilian forest in hopes of solving an ancient mystery: Why do some fungi emit light?

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Around the Nation
5:11 am
Sat March 21, 2015

Opinion Editor: Penn State Frats Need Immediate Re-evaluation

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 8:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
5:11 am
Sat March 21, 2015

New York Is Losing The Accent That Gave It 'Toidy-Toid Street'

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 10:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

You can tell which city some people are from as soon as they say...

DONALD SEMENZA: Come on, forget about it. What are you, serious? You didn't think I know that? Of course I know that.

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Around the Nation
5:11 am
Sat March 21, 2015

Tsarnaev Friend Testifies: He Was Never Violent

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 8:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Sat March 21, 2015

With Fewer New Teachers, Why Do Some Stick Around?

LA Johnson/NPR

Earlier this month, we reported on an alarming drop in enrollment at teacher training programs in several large states. Considering the job's long hours, generally low pay and unpopular testing requirements, many teachers in our audience weren't surprised by the trend.

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The Two-Way
5:25 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

Benghazi Panel Asks Clinton To Hand Over Her Email Server

The House committee that's investigating the 2012 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, has formally asked Hillary Clinton to turn over her email server after it emerged that she used a personal email account during her tenure as secretary of state.

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Code Switch
5:22 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

From Selma To Eisenhower, Trailblazing Black Reporter Was Always Probing

Ms. Payne interviewing a soldier from Chesapeake, Va., in Vietnam in 1967.
Courtesy of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center/Harper Collins

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 7:39 am

When Ethel Payne stood to ask President Dwight Eisenhower a question at a White House press conference in July 1954, women and African-Americans were rarities in the press corps. Payne was both, and wrote for The Chicago Defender, the legendary black newspaper that in the 40s and 50s, was read in black American households the way The New York Times was in white ones.

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Animals
4:15 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

Record Number Of Stranded Sea Lion Pups Strains California Resources

So far this month, more than 330 California sea lions have been admitted to the Marine Mammal Care Center at Fort MacArthur in San Pedro, Calif.
Nathan Rott NPR

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 5:58 pm

There are more than two dozen pens at the Marine Mammal Care Center in San Pedro, Calif., and no vacancy. They're filled with more than a hundred sea lion pups, grouped by health condition.

The pups in the first row of pens are swimming in small pools and sliding across the wet concrete.

"These guys on this half of the facility are actually doing pretty well," says Lauren Palmer, the chief biologist at the center. "They're eating on their own. They're playing. They're porpoising."

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Shots - Health News
3:12 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

Scientists Urge Temporary Moratorium On Human Genome Edits

Microbiologist Jennifer Doudna at the University of California, Berkeley. She's co-inventor of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology — a tool that's recently made the snipping and splicing of genes much easier.
Cailey Cotner UC Berkeley

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 5:58 pm

A new technology called CRISPR could allow scientists to alter the human genetic code for generations. That's causing some leading biologists and bioethicists to sound an alarm.

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U.S.
2:55 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

World War II Veteran Lucy Coffey Dies At 108

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 5:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The nation's oldest female veteran is being remembered today. Lucy Coffey was 108 years old when she died at her home in San Antonio yesterday.

DON GONYEA, HOST:

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Energy
2:55 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

Interior Department Issues New Federal Rules On 'Fracking'

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 5:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It's All Politics
2:55 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

It's All About The Benjamins And Jacksons — But What About The Women?

"There hasn't been a change of the portraits since 1929 ... it's time to bring our money into the 21st century," says Susan Ades Stone, spokeswoman for Women on 20s.
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 5:58 pm

The college basketball playoffs have turned March into a month when many of us become bracket watchers. There is another playoff taking place that you may not have heard of — an online campaign to choose a woman to put on the $20 bill.

If you look into your wallet, whether you're feeling flush, or not, there's one thing the bills you do find all have in common ... the faces of dead white men. Most are presidents: Washington, Lincoln and Jackson. A few, Hamilton and Franklin among them, famous for other reasons. But not one of the faces is female.

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