U.S. News

Around the Nation
3:16 pm
Tue October 30, 2012

Rising Waters Leave Some Trapped in Moonachie, N.J.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Hurricane Sandy made landfall in southern New Jersey and left a path of destruction all the way up the state. Just across the river from New York in Bergen County, water flowed over the top of a levee along the Hackensack River, and then it poured into the town of Moonachie.

NPR's Jim Zarroli went there today.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:15 pm
Tue October 30, 2012

Sandy Continues To Disrupt Lives As It Heads West

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Sandy has spoken. Over the past 24 hours, the storm has swamped vast sections of the Jersey shore, crippled much of New York City and left more than 8 million Americans in the dark.

Read more
Success Factors: Rich, Poor And Everybody Else
3:00 pm
Tue October 30, 2012

Paid In America: The Road To The Middle

Sarah Bidgood is managing editor of the Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography. She says her parents helped her start adult life with no debt, giving her a leg up.
Art Silverman NPR

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 9:07 pm

As the presidential campaign has unfolded, the candidates have traded polemics about wealth, class warfare, taxes, dependency and the role of government.

And while it may be uncomfortable to admit, some Americans are simply more financially successful than others. But why do some achieve wealth, while others struggle? Why does one woman make it to the executive suite, while another man drives a taxi? And what do we think explains our prosperity — or lack thereof?

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:41 pm
Tue October 30, 2012

Superstorm Sandy Takes Toll On New York Hospitals

Ambulances line up outside New York University Langone Medical Center to evacuate patients after backup generators failed when Sandy knocked out power in Lower Manhattan Monday.
John Minchillo AP

When a storm hits, people count on the local hospital to be ready — no matter what.

But when Sandy slammed into New York City, one of Manhattan's biggest hospitals buckled. After the power went out in Lower Manhattan, New York University Langone Medical Center's backup power generators failed, too.

That led to the evacuation of more than 200 patients to other hospitals, including Mount Sinai Medical Center and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

Patients were still being moved Tuesday morning, the Huffington Post reported.

Read more
The Salt
11:01 am
Tue October 30, 2012

More Tips For Feeding The Family, Hurricane Edition

Sterno-type cooking in 1948. Many people still use these cooking tools today when disaster strikes.
AP

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 12:38 pm

Our readers were buzzing with ideas after yesterday's post on keeping the family well-fed during Hurricane Sandy-related power outages. What topped their list of topics? Egg safety, coffee preparedness, and what to do with pantry goods.

Read more
U.S.
10:39 am
Tue October 30, 2012

Large Parts Of Manhattan Underwater

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:20 am

Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep talk with NPR's Elizabeth Shogren and Zoe Chace for a roundup of news on Superstorm Sandy.

U.S.
10:39 am
Tue October 30, 2012

Sandy Causes Power Outages, Flooding In N.J.

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. So we heard the number earlier this hour. Our correspondent Elizabeth Shogren checked in with major utilities, found at least 7 million customers without power. A couple million of them are New Jersey, and the state's governor, Chris Christie, says many people without power might be waiting a while.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

Read more
U.S.
10:39 am
Tue October 30, 2012

Sandy Brings Blizzard Conditions To W.Va.

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:20 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. As superstorm Sandy battered the East Coast with rain and wind, she also brought blizzard conditions to much of West Virginia. Earl Ray Tomblin is the governor of West Virginia, and he joins us on the line to talk about his state.

Good morning.

GOVERNOR EARL RAY TOMBLIN: Good morning, Renee.

Read more
Mental Health
9:39 am
Tue October 30, 2012

The Psychological Damage From Superstorm Sandy

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 10:13 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, NPR has a new poll out on the presidential race, so we decided to talk a little bit about the science and business of polling and why so many polls conflict with each other. That's in just a few minutes.

Read more
U.S.
9:02 am
Tue October 30, 2012

East Coast Reeling After Hurricane Sandy

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
6:59 am
Tue October 30, 2012

Maryland Governor Talks About How Sandy Is Affecting State

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:20 am

Steve Inskeep talks with Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley about Hurricane Sandy and how it's affecting his state.

NPR Story
6:59 am
Tue October 30, 2012

Riding Out The Storm On A Sailboat

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:20 am

For Jennifer Kaye, Hurricane Sandy is a threat to her livelihood. Kaye is General Manager and Captain of the Schooner Woodwind, a family-owned business based in Annapolis, Maryland. She and her crew are riding out the storm on board a 74-foot sailboat. Kaye explains how being on the boat is key to protecting it.

The Two-Way
4:42 am
Tue October 30, 2012

Latest On Sandy: Death Toll, Damages Rise As Superstorm Heads North

Debris and sections of a destroyed boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J., earlier today.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 5:16 am

Sandy, the hurricane-turned-superstorm, has left dozens dead, millions without power and thousands in need of rescue from rising waters as it slowly moves north and west from the Mid-Atlantic to pass over the Great Lakes and into Canada.

According to The Associated Press, storm damage was projected at $20 billion, "meaning it could prove to be one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history."

Sandy has also taken a huge human toll: More than 30 deaths since the weekend and millions more coping with damaged homes, crippled transportation systems and no power.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:24 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

FEMA Braces For Post-Hurricane Sandy Mess

Official Washington shut down today for Hurricane Sandy, but the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was on the job. It's mission: preparedness. Among other things, the agency is stockpiling water, meals, blankets and cots.

Around the Nation
3:16 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Evacuations Ordered Along New Jersey Coast

Robert Siegel talks with Joel Rose, who traveled along the coast of northern New Jersey, about the impact of Hurricane Sandy.

Around the Nation
3:15 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Sandy Disrupts Lives Of Millions On The East Coast

Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish have the latest on Hurricane Sandy and its effects on the region.

Around the Nation
3:15 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Waves Pound Maryland Coast As Hurricane Nears

Audie Cornish speaks with Larry Abramson in Ocean City, Md., about the impact of Hurricane Sandy. The storm has already destroyed the town's fishing pier and sent floodwaters pouring into low-lying areas

Around the Nation
3:13 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Sandy Upends Presidential Race As Election Nears

Hurricane Sandy has disrupted the presidential campaigns of President Obama and Republican rival Mitt Romney. Both campaigns cancelled scheduled events for Monday and Tuesday.

Around the Nation
3:12 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

'Frankenstorm' Sandy Churns Toward East Coast

Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish check in with Jeff Brady, who monitored coastal conditions and official briefings in Cape May, N.J. They also talk to Margot Adler in New York City. Science Correspondent Joe Palca talks about the storm's strength and direction, as well as some of the unusual characteristics that have inspired the nickname "Frankenstorm."

The Two-Way
2:42 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Hurricane Sandy's Economic Impact Likely To Be Immense

Waves crash over a road as Hurricane Sandy comes up the coast Monday in Winthrop, Mass. Economists are predicting the storm will cost tens of billions of dollars.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 3:12 pm

Economists will need many days — maybe weeks or months — to assess the financial harm being done by Hurricane Sandy. But whatever the final figure, it will be huge, well into the tens of billions of dollars.

More than 60 million Americans are feeling the impact of the weather monster slamming New York, New Jersey, Maryland, the District of Columbia, Virginia, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and many other states. The howling mix of wind, rain and snow is causing massive direct losses, i.e., the destruction of private homes, stores, boats and cars.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:27 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Want To Be Rich? Be Lucky, Know Right People

Michael and Amy Tiemann estimate their personal wealth at about $25 million — and say luck played no small part in their financial success.
Art Silverman NPR

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 9:42 am

As the presidential campaign has unfolded, the candidates have traded polemics about wealth, class warfare, dependency and the role of government.

And while it may be uncomfortable to admit, some Americans are simply more financially successful than others. But why do some achieve wealth, while others struggle? And what do we think explains our prosperity — or lack thereof?

Read more
Law
2:24 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Despite Hurricane, Justices Hear Surveillance Case

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 4:22 pm

The rest of the government may have been shut down for the hurricane, but not the U.S. Supreme Court.

The justices were in court Monday to consider a challenge to the 2008 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, known as FISA. The new law broadly expanded the government's ability to conduct large-scale monitoring of international phone calls and emails to and from people in the United States.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:10 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Risks Rise With Hurricane Sandy's Surge

Waves crashed over a road in Winthrop, Mass., as Hurricane Sandy moved toward coastal areas Monday.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 6:17 am

Hurricane Sandy may be grinding closer to the East Coast with 90 mph winds and torrential rains, but the most devastating aspect is likely to be storm surge.

Simply put, storm surge is wind-driven water that is forced against the shore, piling up in low-lying areas where it can cause dangerous flooding. A number of factors can make storm surge worse: a massive storm with high winds headed straight for a region full of shallow coastal bays and inlets.

Sandy seems to have them all, says Chris Landsea, science and operations officer at the National Hurricane Center.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:38 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Supreme Court Soldiers On, Despite Sandy

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 4:34 pm

While the rest of the federal government shut down Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court was open for business as usual — at least long enough to hear two cases argued.

It is hardly the first time that the high court was the macho guy in town, staying open when the rest of the government was closed. The reason appears to be tradition, albeit a modern tradition.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:20 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Obama And Romney Respond To Sandy With Election (And Katrina) In Mind

President Obama walks toward the White House on Monday after returning to Washington to monitor the government response to Hurricane Sandy.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 1:48 pm

Thanks to Hurricane Sandy, the week before Election Day is certainly not turning out the way anyone expected, especially the presidential candidates.

President Obama and Mitt Romney found themselves ditching their schedules for the start of the week as they responded to exigencies created by the massive hurricane raking the U.S. Eastern Seaboard.

Read more
U.S.
1:10 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Pumps And Polls: Why Americans Wait In Lines

People wait to purchase groceries in self-checkout lanes at Safeway in Washington, D.C.
Keith Jenkins NPR

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 1:55 pm

Please line up for this multiple choice quiz:

Days before the deluge descended and the chaos commenced, Americans along the Eastern Seaboard waited patiently in single-file lines to try to influence their destiny. Were they ...

A) Waiting to buy gasoline at a station before Hurricane Sandy hit?

B) Showing up to participate in early voting for the 2012 election?

C) All of the above

Read more
The Salt
9:05 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Six Tips For Feeding The Family During A Storm-Related Power Outage

People try to get through the aisles at Whole Foods Market in Midtown in New York on Sunday before the storm.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 10:48 am

Before you brave the rain, wind and inevitable lines at the already depleted grocery store today in the Mid-Atlantic region, take a deep breath.

If you're a moderately good grocery shopper, you probably already have the food you need on hand to make it through the next few days if (when) we lose power because of Hurricane Sandy. (If not, best to find a shelter near you.) But you do need to take extra precautions that what you're preparing is safe.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:17 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Pricey New Prostate Cancer Therapy Raises Questions About Safety, Cost

Radiation therapist Jean Etienne holds a range compensator, which shapes the depth to which the proton beam enters a patient's body to target a tumor.
Rebecca Davis NPR

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 8:42 am

Bill Sneddon had a feeling he was in trouble when his doctor called with his latest test results.

"I just had a premonition that something's not right," said Sneddon, 68, of Ocean Township, N.J.

And, sure enough, Sneddon's instincts were right. He had prostate cancer.

"Well, it's an eye-opener, you know. I didn't know if I had to buy a yard sale sign, you know," he said. "It's a shocking thing ... It always happens to someone else."

Read more
Education
2:59 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Undocumented Students Take Education Underground

Pam Voekel is a volunteer teacher at Freedom University in Georgia, an informal school for undocumented youth who are banned from some state schools.
John Paul Gallagher

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 2:19 pm

About 35 students meet every Sunday at an undisclosed location in Georgia to study. They are undocumented and banned from attending some of the most prestigious colleges in the state.

Georgia is one of three states to bar undocumented students from attending schools. But a group of professors at the University of Georgia has created a fledgling school to provide a place for students to learn.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:48 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

A Save Haven For The Printed Word Turns 200

Antiquarian Hall, the home of the American Antiquarian Society, is located in Worcester, Mass.
The American Antiquarian Society

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 12:37 pm

Back in the 1700s, there was a young printer's apprentice who lived in Boston. His name was Isaiah Thomas and he became one of the first newspaper publishers in the country. He also founded the American Antiquarian Society, which celebrates its 200th birthday this week.

Located in Worcester, Mass., the American Antiquarian Society houses the largest collection of materials printed in the United States. Its library has books, newspapers, letters, even board games dating from 1640 to 1876. Its members include some notable characters, including 14 presidents.

Read more

Pages