U.S. News

Education
3:17 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Harvard Searched Resident Dean's Email Accounts After Cheating Scandal Leak

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 6:14 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Faculty and staff at Harvard University are in an uproar after learning that college administrators searched employee emails. Harvard was looking for the source of a leak to the media about a cheating scandal last year.

Now, Harvard staff say they feel cheated, as Curt Nickisch reports from member station WBUR.

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Law
3:17 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Former Detroit Mayor Convicted Of Corruption, Racketeering

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 3:36 pm

Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, was convicted on a variety of corruption charges in federal court in Detroit on Monday. He was convicted on 24 of 30 charges and faces a maximum 20 years in prison.

Digital Life
3:17 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Blocking SXSW Tweets Can Help Mute The Noise From Austin

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Even if you're not at South by Southwest, it still may be impossible to avoid reading about it on Twitter if you have friends there. But there are ways to mute those tweets.

So we turn to Dylan Tweney, a tweet connoisseur, for some advice.

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The Salt
2:51 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Judge Overturns New York City Ban On Big Sugary Sodas

A customer fills a 21-ounce cup with soda at a New York City McDonald's.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 6:06 pm

A New York state judge has knocked down New York City's landmark new ban on big, sugary drinks, just one day before it was set to take effect.

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Around the Nation
2:47 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Owens Valley Salty As Los Angeles Water Battle Flows Into Court

Owens Lake — which dried up after losing its water source, the Owens River, to Los Angeles — is known to be a source of air pollution. The city of L.A. is in court over obligations to control dust pollution at the lake.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 4:30 pm

In the West, fights over water last a long time.

It's been almost 100 years since William Mulholland stood atop an aqueduct along the Owens River and said, "There it is, take it." He was referring to a diversion channel that started piping water to Los Angeles from 200 miles away. That water allowed L.A. to become the metropolis it is today.

But it also meant that the Owens River no longer flowed into the massive Owens Lake, which quickly dried up and became one of the biggest environmental disasters in the nation.

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The Impact Of War Project
1:51 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Four-Legged Warriors Show Signs Of PTSD

Bernie Green is a supervisor with the Department of Defense's Military Working Dog Breeding Program. Experts say dogs can suffer from PTSD-like conditions that can affect their military capabilities later on.
Ryan Loyd KSTX

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 6:04 pm

For years, PTSD — or post-traumatic stress disorder — has been an issue for military members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

But humans aren't the only ones with problems. Military dogs returning from war zones are also showing signs of PTSD. And there's evidence that these canines need some extra tender loving care after their tours of duty.

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Health Care
9:57 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Medical Trials Need More Diversity

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 10:48 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Mental Health
9:57 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Forgiveness Isn't All It's Cracked Up To Be

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 11:28 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This is the season of reflection, for many religious people around the world. The importance of repentance and forgiveness are often a focus this time of year. But faith leaders aren't the only people who talk about the importance of forgiveness.

Recently, on this program, we talked about the work of psychologists who are trying to teach people how to practice forgiveness. They note that there are often physical and emotional benefits to forgiveness.

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Health Care
9:57 am
Mon March 11, 2013

African-Americans Suffer From Vaccine Gap

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 11:28 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:40 am
Mon March 11, 2013

In Ohio, Town Mourns Death Of Six Teens Killed In Crash

Friends and family of the six teenagers killed in a car crash brought stuffed animals and other memorials to the site Sunday in Warren, Ohio.
Scott R. Galvin AP

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 9:42 am

Warren, Ohio, is in mourning after the deaths of six teenagers who died Sunday when the SUV they were in ran off a highway, flipped over a guardrail and landed in a small pond.

"It's going to be a rough week, a rough rest of the school year," said Michael Notar, Warren school superintendent, as NBC News reports.

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Education
3:22 pm
Sun March 10, 2013

Are There Too Many Ph.D.s And Not Enough Jobs?

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 6:50 am

Our country needs more people with science, math and engineering degrees — at least, that's the common refrain among politicians and educators.

American students lag behind the rest of the world when it comes to math and science test scores, and the president and others have called for a change in immigration laws that would make it easier for people who come to the U.S. to get technical degrees to stay in the country permanently.

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Around the Nation
3:01 pm
Sun March 10, 2013

Solitary Confinement: Punishment Or Cruelty?

A hallway at Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia. The prison, opened in 1829 and closed in 1970, pioneered the use of solitary confinement.
Jacki Lyden NPR

An estimated 80,000 American prisoners spend 23 hours a day in closed isolation units for 10, 20 or even more than 30 years.

Now, amid growing evidence that it causes mental breakdown, the Federal Bureau of Prisons has decided for the first time to review its policies on solitary confinement.

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Law
3:01 pm
Sun March 10, 2013

Once On Death Row, He Now Fights To Defeat The Death Penalty

Kirk Bloodsworth was the first person in the U.S. to be exonerated by DNA evidence after receiving the death sentence. Convicted in 1985 of the rape and murder of a young girl, he was released in 1993.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 5:35 pm

Maryland is about to become the 18th state to abolish the death penalty.

A bill has passed the state Senate and is expected to pass the House of Delegates easily with the governor's ardent support. The strongest advocate to end the death penalty in Maryland is Kirk Bloodsworth, who was convicted of murder in that state in 1985 and was the first person in the U.S. to be sentenced to death row then exonerated by DNA evidence.

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National Security
3:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

The CIA Brennan Inherits: More Military, Less Espionage

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 9:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Despite the controversy we just heard about, John Brennan was confirmed by the Senate, making him the next director of the CIA. Scott Shane covers national security and intelligence issues for the New York Times. We asked him what kind of CIA John Brennan will inherit.

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Politics
3:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Alaska Senator's Gun Proposal Looks To Fix Existing System

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 9:20 am

Host Rachel Martin talks with Sen. Mark Begich, an Alaska Democrat, about his newly proposed gun violence legislation. He introduced it at a press conference with Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham this past week.

Afghanistan
3:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Defense Secretary Hagel Navigates Afghan 'War Zone'

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 9:20 am

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel is taking his first overseas trip since taking the top job at the Pentagon. He'll be visiting troops and key officials in Afghanistan. Host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's David Welna, who is along on the trip.

U.S.
3:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

De-Escalating Urban Violence In Most Vulnerable Moments

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 9:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So that is one specific way that some in Congress are trying to address the issue of gun violence. Dr. Ted Corbin of Philadelphia says there's a need for broader gun control laws. But he also says people in his field can make a difference. Corbin is an emergency room doctor and the director of a program called Healing Hurt People. Corbin says when someone comes into an emergency room with a gunshot wound, there's an opportunity to make sure it doesn't happen again by directly introducing the victims to social services.

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The Salt
3:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Poi: Hawaii's Recipe For Revitalizing Island Culture

Historians think poi, a sticky, nutritious food made from pounded taro root, has been eaten in the Hawaiian islands since the time of the ancient Polynesians.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 10:00 am

There are only about 1,000 people of pure Hawaiian descent left in the world, but island residents are cooking up an idea to keep native island culture from fading away. The key ingredient? Reviving a starchy food called poi.

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National Security
3:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

When Rand Paul Ended Filibuster, He Left Drones On National Stage

Code Pink activists deliver flowers, candies and other objects of thanks to Sen. Rand Paul's Capitol Hill offices Thursday for filibustering John Brennan's CIA nomination.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:21 am

Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky launched a nationwide conversation last week with his 13-hour filibuster of the president's nominee to lead the CIA.

Paul vowed to keep talking until the White House clarified whether it has authority to kill U.S. citizens on American soil with drones.

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The Two-Way
7:58 am
Sat March 9, 2013

Second Claim Of Sexual Misconduct Against Former U.S. Olympic Speedskater

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 7:59 am

Ex-skater and former US Speedskating President Andy Gabel faces a second accusation of sexual misconduct, as first reported by member station WUWM in Milwaukee.

Former skater Nikki Meyer told the NPR affiliate that she was assaulted by Gabel in the 1990s when she was 15 and he was 26.

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Around the Nation
5:10 am
Sat March 9, 2013

Amid Unemployment Numbers, Faces Of Those Who've Lost Hope

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 6:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

At the same time, there are millions of Americans you can't find in monthly job reports. They've been unemployed so long they're no longer counted, or they're working just a few hours a week in jobs that can't support them. The Bureau of Labor Statistics also said yesterday that what they call the labor force participation rate fell again to 63.5 percent, the lowest number since 1981.

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Economy
5:10 am
Sat March 9, 2013

Jobs Report Produces More Relief Than Celebration

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 6:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. When it comes to job creation, the U.S. economy has been in a rut. Now, in a moment, we'll hear from Americans who have been struggling to find work, but yesterday's jobs report suggests things might be changing a bit. Employers added far more jobs than expected, and the unemployment rate declined to its lowest point in more than four years.

Even so, the news produced more relief than celebration. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

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U.S.
5:10 am
Sat March 9, 2013

Found At Sea, Civil War Sailors Buried In Arlington

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 6:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Two American sailors were laid to rest yesterday at Arlington National Cemetery more than 150 years after they died.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC, "TAPS")

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StoryCorps
3:42 am
Sat March 9, 2013

Returning From Duty, Finding Families' Embrace

Luke and Mark Radlinski reunite at the airport after Mark's deployment in 2007.
Courtesy of Luke Radlinski

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 10:29 am

StoryCorps' Military Voices Initiative records stories from members of the military who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many of the participants in this project have been speaking about being separated from their loved ones.

This week, Weekend Edition is featuring two stories of families reuniting after deployment.

Brothers' Bond

Both of the Radlinski brothers served in the Navy. Luke deployed in 2001 to the Persian Gulf in support of the conflict in Afghanistan. His brother, Mark, went to Iraq in 2006.

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Around the Nation
2:43 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

In Chicago, Dueling Ads Over The Meaning Of 'Jihad'

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 4:03 pm

There is an advertising battle going on over the Arabic term jihad. In Chicago, a group has launched a bus and subway ad campaign meant to reclaim the term jihad from another series of ads that presents jihadists as violent.

Sports
2:23 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

Chicago Blackhawks Continue Remarkable NHL Winning Streak

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 4:03 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The Chicago Blackhawks of the National Hockey League have done something remarkable. They've gone half of the current season, 24 games, without losing in regulation time. Here to talk about that feat and other hockey news is sportswriter Stephen Fatsis. Hey there, Stephen.

STEPHEN FATSIS, BYLINE: Hey, Audie.

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Education
2:23 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

Faced With Massive Budget Cuts, Philadelphia Plans To Shutter 23 Schools

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 4:03 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Philadelphia is closing almost two dozen of its public schools. The move prompted outcry in the nation's fifth largest city, but the schools in Philly face declining enrollment, aging infrastructure and massive state budget cuts. And those forces came to a head last night when the city's school reform commission took a vote. Benjamin Herold is covering the emotional decision from member station WHYY.

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Economy
2:23 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

Economists Pleasantly Surprised By February Jobs Report

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 4:03 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. 7.7 percent is the latest unemployment rate. That's the number for February, according to the Labor Department's report out this morning. Economists were expecting a ho-hum job survey. Instead, they got a pleasant surprise, as NPR's Dan Bobkoff reports.

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Law
2:23 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

Dismissal Of Air Force Officer's Sexual Assault Conviction Raises Questions

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 4:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Some U.S. Senators are demanding answers after an Air Force commander dismissed a sexual assault conviction against one of his officers. Lieutenant Colonel James Wilkerson had been sentenced to a year in prison and dismissal from the military for aggravated sexual assault, but he's been reinstated. Senators Jean Shaheen and Barbara Boxer called the decision a travesty of justice. They and Senator Claire McCaskill have written to defense officials about the case.

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Economy
2:23 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

Improved U.S. Jobs Numbers Could Take A Hit From New Budget Cuts

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 4:03 pm

The White House is cheering a better than expected jobs report. But economists caution that automatic government spending cuts could lead to slower job growth in the months to come.

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