U.S. News

Law
9:52 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Do You Really Know Who's Behind Bars?

There's been a dramatic shift in the racial makeup of America's prison inmates, especially female inmates. To find out why, host Michel Martin talks with Sentencing Project Executive Director Marc Mauer, and author Patrice Gaines, who has worked with women in prison for more than 20 years. They say changes in drug crime enforcement, sentencing laws, and the economic downturn all played a role.

The Two-Way
9:19 am
Fri March 15, 2013

CDC Confirms 'Extremely Rare' Death From Rabies Transmitted By Transplant

A Maryland man who died two weeks ago contracted rabies "through [an] organ transplantation done more than a year ago," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed Friday morning.

The CDC adds that:

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Race
3:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Game Of Change: Pivotal Matchup Helped End Segregated Hoops

Mississippi State's Stan Brinker (53) and Loyola's Jerry Harkness (15) shake hands before the NCAA Mideast regional semifinal college basketball game in East Lansing, Mich., on March 15, 1963. The game was a landmark contest between the schools that helped alter race relations on the basketball court.
Loyola University Chicago AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:14 pm

During the March Madness of 1963, playing was infused with politics. The NCAA matchup between Loyola University of Chicago and Mississippi State helped put an end to segregated basketball. Loyola's win 50 years ago became known as the "game of change."

At the time, college basketball was still predominantly white, with usually no more than two or three black players appearing on the floor at any one time. But in '63, the Loyola Ramblers' starting lineup featured four black players.

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National Security
3:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Is All The Talk About Cyberwarfare Just Hype?

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper says the danger of a devastating cyberattack is the No. 1 threat facing the U.S. He made the assessment Tuesday on Capitol Hill before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on worldwide threats.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:00 am

U.S. government pronouncements about the danger of a major cyberattack can be confusing. The director of national intelligence, James Clapper, and the head of the U.S. military's Cyber Command, Army Gen. Keith Alexander, delivered mixed messages this week while testifying on Capitol Hill.

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The Two-Way
5:14 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

New York City Hits A New Population Mark, Topping 8.3 Million

For the first time in six decades, New York City has added more residents than it lost, according to the most recent Census data. Here, lower Manhattan and Brooklyn are seen in a photo taken in February.
Frank Franklin II AP

New York City's population is at an all-time high, with an estimated 8,336,697 people living in the city, according to the most recent U.S. Census Data. "For the first time since before 1950, more people are coming to New York City than leaving," said Mayor Bloomberg, announcing the gains Thursday.

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Politics
3:27 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Obama's 'Organizing For Action' Inherited His Campaign's Resources

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 4:49 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

While Republicans are trying to bridge their differences, Democrats find themselves broadly united behind the president's second term agenda. That doesn't mean the work will automatically get done, however, so as NPR's Ari Shapiro reports, some of Obama's biggest supporters are meeting in Washington to turn the president's campaign momentum into policy.

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Around the Nation
3:27 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Path To Immigration Too Toxic A Topic For Many Republican Politicians

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 4:49 pm

Amid GOP soul-searching over a dismal 2012 election, a consensus has emerged that Republicans must appeal better to Latino voters. The effort has even appeared at the Conservative Political Action Conference, with a panel on immigration reform on Thursday morning.

Politics
3:27 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Conservative Conference A Parade Of Potential Candidates For 2016

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 4:49 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Here in the nation's capitol, today is a day to talk about future agendas. For Democrats, it's about the second Obama term; for conservatives, it's the future of the Republican Party. We'll hear about both in the next few minutes, beginning with CPAC - that's the annual Conservative Political Action Conference that opened today.

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The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Death Row Inmate Fights For Right To Die In Oregon

Sentenced to death in 2007, Gary Haugen's lawyer asked the Oregon Supreme Court to allow the inmate to reject a reprieve from Gov. John Kitzhaber. Haugen is seen here in 2011.
Rick Bowmer AP

Convicted murderer Gary Haugen has spent more than 30 years in prison; he's been on death row since 2007. And if he had his way, he would schedule his execution tomorrow. But in an unusual case, the Oregon Supreme Court must decide whether Haugen, who has waived his right to appeal, can die — or if Gov. John Kitzhaber's reprieve of Haugen should stand.

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Environment
2:34 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

As His Home Melts Away, Teenager Sues Alaska

Nelson Kanuk, a senior at Mt. Edgecumbe High School, is one of six Alaskan youth suing the state, asking it to pay more attention to climate change.
Ed Ronco for NPR

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 4:49 pm

Nelson Kanuk's house is built on a melting tundra. In a year or two, it could be gone.

So the 18-year-old Yup'ik Eskimo is suing the state of Alaska, arguing the state needs to take more action on climate change.

"The river that runs in front of my house is called the Kugkaktlik River, and it means 'the middle one' in the Yup'ik language," Kanuk says.

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The Two-Way
12:40 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Detroit Is 'Olympics Of Restructuring,' New Emergency Manager Says

Kevyn Orr, "a high-powered Washington, D.C., lawyer and University of Michigan graduate who worked on Chrysler's 2009 bankruptcy restructuring," has been given the job of straightening out the city of Detroit's desperate financial mess, the Detroit Free Press writes.

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder (R), who earlier this month declared that the city is in a financial emergency, tapped Orr with the job Thursday.

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The Two-Way
10:23 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Alabama's Governor Signs Education Bill Allowing School Choice

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley has signed the controversial Alabama Accountability Act into law. The measure's opponents say they will seek to block it.
Dave Martin AP

Alabama's Gov. Robert Bentley has signed a sweeping education bill that gives tax credits to parents who want to transfer their children from a failing public school to another public or private school. The bill became law one day after the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that a lawsuit against it was premature.

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Music
10:03 am
Thu March 14, 2013

2013 SXSW Standouts

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Remembrances
9:39 am
Thu March 14, 2013

A First For Latinos: Remembering Raymond Telles

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 10:03 am

The late Raymond Telles may not be a household name, but he was a trailblazer for Latinos in politics; he was the first Latino elected mayor of El Paso, Texas and later became a U.S. Ambassador to Costa Rica. Host Michel Martin looks back on Ambassador Telles' life with former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Henry Cisneros.

Health
9:39 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Homeless Age Faster

Studies show there are a growing number of homeless people around the age of 50. But it's common for them to experience illnesses and injuries more common among people well beyond their age. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR correspondent, Pam Fessler and homeless advocate, Tony Simmons, about the rising number of aging homeless.

The Two-Way
9:18 am
Thu March 14, 2013

In Partisan Vote, Senate Committee OKs Ban On Assault-Style Weapons

Assault-style rifles on display at Chuck's Firearms gun store in Atlanta.
Erik S. Lesser EPA /Landov

By a 10-8, party-line vote with Democrats in favor and Republicans opposed, the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday moved legislation that would revive the ban on assault-style weapons that expired in 2004.

The vote, while expected, remains noteworthy because it is among a handful of legislative responses so far to the mass shootings in recent years — most notably the Dec. 14 attack on an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., that left 20 children and six educators dead.

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Shots - Health News
8:36 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Neurologists Warn Against ADHD Drugs To Help Kids Study

Ten milligram tablets of the prescription drug Adderall. The drug is used to treat ADHD and is used by some students to boost their academic performance.
Jb Reed Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:48 am

Adderall and other ADHD medications are among the most prescribed drugs in America.

Quite a few of those pills don't end up being used to treat ADHD, though. They're used as "smart drugs" or "study drugs" by students who find the pills give them a mental edge.

The American Academy of Neurology now says: Stop that.

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The Two-Way
7:18 am
Thu March 14, 2013

After Standoff, Suspect In N.Y. Shooting Deaths Of 4 Is Killed By Police

In Herkimer, N.Y., police and suspect Kurt Myers were in a standoff from midday Wednesday into early early Thursday. Overnight, these officers were on the town's North Main Street.
Brett Carlsen Getty Images

A deadly drama in central New York State ended early Thursday when police killed the man suspected of shooting to death four people and injuring two others on Wednesday, Utica's Observer-Dispatch reports.

According to the newspaper:

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Around the Nation
3:26 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Crime Lab Scandal Leaves Mass. Legal System In Turmoil

Annie Dookan, a former Massachusetts crime lab chemist, is accused of falsifying evidence in as many as 34,000 cases. The state's criminal justice system is now reeling as former defendants are challenging their convictions and hundreds have already been released.
Jessica Rinaldi Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:26 am

A scandal in a Massachusetts crime lab continues to reverberate throughout the state's legal system. Several months ago, Annie Dookhan, a former chemist in a state crime lab, told police that she messed up big time. Dookhan now stands accused of falsifying test results in as many as 34,000 cases.

As a result, lawyers, prosecutors and judges used to operating in a world of "beyond a reasonable doubt" now have nothing but doubt.

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Religion
5:29 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

New Pope 'A Fresh Start,' But Old Problems Are Waiting

Crowds at St. Peter's Square at the Vatican celebrate Wednesday after seeing white smoke billow from the chimney of the Sistine Chapel, indicating the election of a new pope. The new pontiff, Francis, is the first from Latin America, a reflection that the Catholic Church is now strongest in the Southern Hemisphere.
Oded Balilty AP

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 5:53 pm

Leaders of the Roman Catholic Church made history twice Wednesday, electing the first pope from the Southern Hemisphere and the first Jesuit.

In choosing 76-year-old Cardinal Jorge Maria Bergoglio of Argentina, now Pope Francis, the College of Cardinals signaled the growing importance of Latin America, Africa and Asia in the church's fortunes.

But they also affirmed their commitment to traditional church doctrine.

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The Papal Succession
4:19 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

American Catholics Look To New Pope For Hope, Renewal

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 4:44 pm

Catholics in Philadelphia react on Wednesday to selection of the new pope.

Business
3:35 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Fast Fashion's Challenge: Making Money With 'Made In The USA'

American Apparel boasts that all of its products are made in the USA, primarily at its Los Angeles headquarters. Selling garments produced largely by machine, rather than by hand, has helped the company remain profitable.
Mark Ralston Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 5:02 pm

In the world of fast fashion, two U.S.-based companies loom large: Forever 21 and American Apparel. Both are based in Los Angeles, but the two could not be more different.

American Apparel proudly boasts that the clothes it sells are "made in the USA." In contrast, Forever 21 subcontracts with factories all over the world.

Dov Charney, American Apparel's Canadian-American founder and CEO, has a reputation. "I knew from a very early age — in elementary school — that I was going to rub some people the wrong way," he says.

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Around the Nation
3:17 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Health Problems Compound For Aging Homeless

Tony Lithgow, 49, and Andrea Mayer, 51, live together on the streets of Baltimore. Researchers say the aging homeless population is due to younger baby boomers who came of age during the 1970s and '80s, when there were back-to-back recessions.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 6:27 pm

Tony Lithgow and Andrea Mayer have been living under a highway overpass in downtown Baltimore since last year. He's 49 and has been homeless on and off for eight years. She's 51 and has been homeless for 10 years.

Living on the streets has clearly taken a toll on the couple, both physically and mentally. While they're standing at a corner waiting for a free city bus to take them to a soup kitchen, Tony shouts at a passenger staring at them from a car stopped at the light.

"We're homeless!" he calls out to the man.

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Law
3:17 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Sexual Assault Victims: Military's Criminal Justice System Is Broken

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 4:44 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A difficult conversation about the military occurred today at a Senate panel on Capitol Hill. Victims of sexual assault testified that the military's criminal justice system is broken. They spoke of commanders who brushed aside their claims, prosecutors who decided not to pursue charges, and a military culture that protects predators. The hearing comes after a general's decision to overturn an officer's conviction on sexual assault. NPR's Tom Bowman has the story.

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Politics
3:17 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

As Democrats Unveil Budget, Obama Continues Charm Offensive With GOP

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 4:44 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

The lines are now starkly drawn between Republican and Democratic approaches to the nation's finances. President Obama met with House Republicans today about the budget - they released their budget plan yesterday - and in the other chamber today, Senate Democrats unveiled their proposals.

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Religion
3:17 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

L.A. Archdiocese Settles With Sex Abuse Victims For Nearly $10 Million

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 4:44 pm

The Los Angeles Archdiocese has agreed to pay $10 million to settle a priest sex abuse case. The settlement is the first since documents detailing the involvement of high-ranking church officials — including Cardinal Roger Mahony — in moving and protecting abusive priests. Mahony was at the Vatican where he was one of the 115 cardinals who gathered to select the new pope.

Afghanistan
3:17 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Troops In Afghanistan Receive Hagel As Someone Who's Walked In Their Boots

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 4:44 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Chuck Hagel is freshly back this week from his first trip to Afghanistan as defense secretary. For the 66,000 American troops in Afghanistan, the distance that separates them from their Pentagon superiors can feel enormous. They received Hagel as one who has walked in their boots. NPR's David Welna was along on the trip.

(SOUNDBITE OF MILITARY CADENCE)

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Economy
3:17 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Economy Continues On Road To Recovery, Despite Fiscal Bumps In Washington

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 4:44 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Moving on now to the U.S. economy, there are several signals today that its chugging away at a healthy pace despite fiscal uncertainty in Washington. A report on retail sales finds them up more than expected, and two separate surveys reveal that top executives are feeling pretty good about the outlook for their businesses.

NPR's Yuki Noguchi tells U.S. more.

YUKI NOGUCHI, BYLINE: Ron Arrington is chief money man for a Fort Worth construction company who likes what he sees in his crystal ball.

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Law
3:17 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

High Profile Rape Trial Of High School Football Players Begins In Ohio

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 7:04 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Testimony began today in a rape trail that has thrown a small Ohio town into the international spotlight. Two football players from Steubenville High School are accused of raping a 16-year-old girl during a night of partying last summer. Lawyers for the boys say the sex was consensual. The case has attracted widespread attention in part because of shocking photos, video and texts that circulated over the Internet.

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Shots - Health News
9:38 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Can Free Video Consults Make Parkinson's Care Better?

Most people can't talk with their doctors online, because of regulatory and funding issues.
iStockphoto.com

Why, you might ask, would a hoity-toity medical institution like Johns Hopkins be offering up free Web-based consults for people with Parkinson's disease?

To prove that it works.

Ray Dorsey, director for the Johns Hopkins Movement Disorders Center, is on a mission to convince America that videochats with doctors are as good or better than the traditional office visit.

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