U.S. News

The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Despite Va. Order, Car Services Uber, Lyft Refuse To Pull Over

Passenger Christina Shatzen gets into a car operated by a driver for Lyft. Virginia has sent a cease-and-desist letter to Lyft, Uber and other car-sharing services.
Jeff Chiu AP

Uber and Lyft car services have said they will continue to operate in Virginia, despite a cease-and-desist letter from the state saying the service is illegal because it hasn't received authorization from the Department of Motor Vehicles.

It comes a day after Colorado became the first state to pass a law regulating such companies, which use smartphone apps to connect passengers with drivers of vehicles for hire and ridesharing services and have seen fast growth in recent years in some parts of the country.

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Economy
2:13 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

In May Jobs Report, A Milestone: A Return To Pre-Recession Levels

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 5:29 pm

The May jobs report showed steady job creation. Payrolls expanded by 217,000, and unemployment held steady at 6.3%. And there was a milestone: The U.S. economy now has slightly more jobs than it did in December 2007, when the last recession began.

Shots - Health News
11:15 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Early Exposure To Bacteria Protects Children From Asthma And Allergies

To keep children healthy, it may take a city that's dirty in just the right way.
Carey Kirkella Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 1:57 pm

Babies who are exposed to both bacteria and allergens in the first year of life are less likely to develop asthma and allergies, a study finds.

It's the latest wrinkle in the hygiene hypothesis — the notion that exposure to bacteria trains the infant immune system to attack bad bugs and ignore harmless things like pollen and cat dander.

But what's interesting about this study is that it gets specific; not just any old germs or allergens will do.

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Law
10:58 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Should Tweens Be Prosecuted As Adults?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Salt
10:27 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Can Farmed Fish Feed The World Without Destroying The Environment?

Carp are collected at a breeding farm near the Belarus village of Ozerny in November 2013. Researchers say there's a lot the aquaculture industry can do to be more efficient.
Viktor Drachev AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 6:19 am

We Americans love our fried shrimp, our sushi and our fish sticks. And a lot of other people around the world count on fish as a critical part of their diet, too. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization, fish now accounts for almost 17 percent of the world's intake of protein — in some coastal and island countries it's as high as 70 percent.

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Opinion
7:40 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Heroes Among Us: When Ordinary People Become Extraordinary

Students and faculty pray together following a shooting on the campus of Seattle Pacific University on Thursday.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 5:27 am

You can't identify a hero from the outside. You might not suspect that Jon Meis, the Seattle Pacific University student who has been described as private and gentle, would tackle and subdue a gunman Thursday, inspiring others to help hold down the attacker until police arrived. Would those other students have acted if Meis had not?

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The Two-Way
5:02 am
Fri June 6, 2014

In San Antonio, Spurs Beat The Heat Twice In One Game

LeBron James and the Miami Heat couldn't handle the heat in San Antonio, as Tim Duncan and the Spurs took the first game of the 2014 NBA Finals. The air conditioning in the Spurs arena didn't work during the game.
Chris Covatta Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 8:58 am

The first game of the NBA finals was a scorcher. Yes, it was played indoors – but the air conditioning in San Antonio's arena broke down, leaving the host Spurs and the Miami Heat sweating in 90-degree temperatures. The Spurs overcame the heat, and the Heat, 110-95.

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Dollar For Dollar: Adventures In Investing
2:21 am
Fri June 6, 2014

From Coffee Futures To Bulk Buying: A Year Of Adventurous Investing

Uri Berliner drinking coffee at the NPR headquarters.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 9:09 am

A year ago, NPR's Uri Berliner decided to take his money out of a savings account that was losing value to inflation and turn it loose in an investing adventure. A series of stories in 2013 described his newly acquired assets and sought to shed light on how the markets for them worked.

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The Two-Way
6:20 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Shooting At Seattle Pacific University; 3 Wounded, 1 Dead

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 9:24 pm

This post updated at 9:40 p.m ET.

At least three people were wounded and one was killed after a lone gunman opened fire on the campus of Seattle Pacific University, according to Seattle police. Officials say the alleged shooter is in custody.

The campus was placed on lockdown soon after the shooting began just before 3:30 p.m. PT (6:30 p.m. ET).

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The Two-Way
5:25 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Beastie Boys Win A Fight For Their Copyright

Rapper Adam "Ad-Rock" Horovitz leaves a New York City courthouse Thursday.
Larry Neumeister AP

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 11:21 am

The Beastie Boys have won a $1.7 million verdict against the makers of Monster Energy drink in a copyright infringement dispute over the company's use of the band's songs in a 2012 promotional video.

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Around the Nation
4:53 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Stay-At-Home Dads On The Rise, And Many Of Them Are Poor

The number of fathers in the U.S. who stay at home with their children has nearly doubled since 1989.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:38 am

The number of dads staying at home with their children has nearly doubled in the past two decades, and the diversity among them defies the stereotype of the highly educated young father who stays home to let his wife focus on her career.

A new study from the Pew Research Center finds that almost 2 million fathers are at home, up from 1.1 million in 1989. Nearly half of those men live in poverty.

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Economy
4:34 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Is Pushing Interest Rates To Less Than Zero A Crazy Idea?

European Central Bank President Mario Draghi speaks at a news conference Thursday in Frankfurt after the ECB said it was cutting rates.
Arne Dedert AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:17 pm

By now, you may have heard that on Thursday, the European Central Bank shifted to a negative interest-rate policy for deposits.

That news may have prompted two thoughts: 1) Isn't that crazy? 2) Who cares what happens in Europe?

These questions have answers. But first, some background:

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Media
3:35 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

'New York Times' Editor: Losing Snowden Scoop 'Really Painful'

Edward Snowden didn't trust The New York Times with his revelations about the National Security Agency because the newspaper had delayed publishing a story about NSA secrets a decade earlier.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:13 pm

When former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden made the fateful decision to share sensitive documents with reporters revealing secret and mass gathering of the metadata associated with the phone calls made by tens of millions of Americans, he had to figure out which news outfit to trust.

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The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Fla. Man Impersonating Officer Pulls Over Unmarked Sheriff's Car

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 12:45 pm

Not the wisest of moves: A man impersonating a police officer in Florida signals a real sheriff's detective driving an unmarked car to pull over.

WESH in Orlando reports that the suspect, 20-year-old Matthew Lee McMahon, "activated a red and blue light Monday while driving behind an unmarked county sheriff's car."

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Code Switch
2:32 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Mississippi Marks 50 Years Since History-Changing 'Freedom Summer'

A new exhibit at the Mississippi state archives includes photographs, excerpts from journals and film clips documenting 1964's Freedom Summer.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 4:50 pm

A new exhibit at the Mississippi state archives takes you back in time. The facade of a front porch, complete with screen door, invites you to imagine what it was like for some 900 activists, mostly white college students, who in 1964 came to the nation's most closed society.

Robert Moses was an organizer of what was at the time formally known as the Mississippi Summer Project.

"That's sort of what was nice about it. There was no pretension that we were going to change history," Moses says. "We were just going to have our little summer project."

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News
2:16 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

One Year Later, Snowden Still Evades U.S. Charges

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Around the Nation
2:16 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Bergdahl Homecoming Party Canceled, As Joy Turns To Worry

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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News
2:16 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

On Eve Of D-Day Anniversary, World Leaders Cope With Fresher Scars

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Politics
2:16 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Outraged Senators Reach Across Aisle For Deal On VA Wait Times

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Some U.S. senators have crafted a bipartisan response to the crisis at the Department of Veterans Affairs. VA Secretary Eric Shinseki resigned last week, amid controversy over treatment delays at veterans' hospitals. Now, a Senate plan calls for construction of new medical centers for veterans. It would also allow quicker dismissal of high-level employees at the VA.

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Shots - Health News
1:02 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Taking More Time Between Babies Reduces Risk Of Premature Birth

Being born prematurely increases the risk of lifelong health problems.
AndyL/iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 7:07 am

An ideal pregnancy lasts 40 weeks. And it looks like there's also an ideal time between pregnancies.

The length of time between giving birth to one baby and getting pregnant with the next should be 18 months or more. Women who get pregnant sooner than that are more likely to have a premature baby.

Women who got pregnant within a year of giving birth were twice as likely to have that new baby born prematurely, a study finds, compared with women who waited at least 18 months.

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Shots - Health News
12:07 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

The GPS In Your Head May Work A Lot Better Than That Phone

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 9:11 am

If I tell you to make your way to NPR's headquarters from the NOMA Metro stop a few blocks away, odds are you'll get yourself here, no problem. But how?

By using two GPS systems in the brain, one that determines the direct distance to the destination, and another that calculates the twists and turns you'll need to take along the way.

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The Salt
9:54 am
Thu June 5, 2014

At 'Pestaurant,' Grasshopper Burgers Win Over Eaters Who Say 'Yuck'

A Grasshopper Burger topped with Mexican spice mealworms.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 6:17 am

If you're a scientist and you work for a pest control company, you're used to thinking about bugs as the enemy you're trained to kill.

Now try putting one in your mouth.

It took some mental rearranging for Nancy Troyano, an entomologist for Ehrlich Pest Control. But on Wednesday she did it for the first time in her life.

"I'm used to looking at grasshoppers under a microscope," Troyano tells The Salt. "I know what their internal organs and the spines on their legs look like, so I was kind of thinking about them."

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The Two-Way
5:04 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Most Americans See Bible As Word Of God, Gallup Says

Abraham T. Moses, principal of the the Washington United Christian Academy, reads scriptures aloud during the 25th annual U.S. Capitol Bible Reading Marathon on April 28, 2014.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 5:33 pm

Three out of four Americans believe the Bible is the word of God, according to a new Gallup poll; some say the literal word, others that a supreme being inspired the text. But an increasing number also view the book as simply a collection of fables, legends and history.

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It's All Politics
4:56 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Is Clinton Distancing Herself From Obama? Maybe Not

Hillary Clinton works a rope line at Intertech Plastics in Denver on Monday.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 6:05 pm

Is Hillary Clinton distancing herself from the Obama administration in preparation for a 2016 presidential run?

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Shots - Health News
3:05 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Doctors Hesitate To Ask Heart Patients About End-Of-Life Plans

Michael Jung iStock

Of the 5 million Americans with failing hearts, about half of them will die within five years of getting diagnosed. Given the odds, it seems that people with heart failure should start thinking about how they want to die.

But doctors don't routinely talk to those patients about end-of-life planning.

When researchers asked 50 doctors and 45 nurse practitioners and physician assistants how often they discuss preparing for death with their heart failure patients.

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Around the Nation
3:04 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

An Underwater Race To Transplant Miami's Rare Corals

Close-up of a star coral rescued by Coral Morphologic from a reef in Miami's shipping channel.
Courtesy of Coral Morphologic

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 5:18 pm

A lab just off Florida's Miami River has become the base for an unusual lifesaving operation.

A group of scientists there is on an urgent mission to save as many corals as it can before the marine creatures are destroyed as part of an underwater excavation of Miami's shipping channel. The channel — set to be dredged and deepened on Saturday — is home to a thriving coral reef.

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National Security
3:00 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Despite Video Of Bergdahl's Release, Questions Dog His Capture

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 5:18 pm

Even as the Taliban released a video of Army Sgt. Bergdahl's release, questions continue to surround his initial disappearance. Bergdahl has said he was captured by the Taliban while lagging behind on a patrol. In a classified report produced in 2010, the Army paints him as a soldier troubled by U.S. policy, but it does not go so far as to call him a deserter. Still, many wonder whether Bergdahl planned to return before his capture.

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Ex-Ambassador To Syria: Civil War Could Drag On For Years

Former U.S. Ambassador to Syria Robert Ford covers his nose from the smell of dead bodies during a visit to a mass grave in the country in 2011. Ford has criticized the U.S. failure to back opposition forces early on.
Bassem Tellawi AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 5:18 pm

When Robert Ford — the U.S. ambassador to Syria — resigned in February, he said he no longer felt he could defend American policy in that country. Ford faults the U.S. for having been unable to address the root causes of the conflict and for being consistently behind the curve as the Syrian civil war intensified.

The diplomat had to leave Damascus in early 2012 and had been working on Syria from Washington until his resignation.

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Shots - Health News
3:00 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Privacy Law Frustrates Parents Of Mentally Ill Adult Children

Mark, a California minister, says the day he was first shut out of all treatment discussions regarding his mentally ill teenage son "was the first time we really started to feel hopeless."
Jenny Gold Kaiser Health News

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 2:40 pm

The horrifying mass shooting in Isla Vista, Calif., last month brought up many questions. What could parents have done to prevent the tragedy? And what did they actually know about their son's mental illness?

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NPR News Investigations
2:08 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Facing Doubts About Court Fines, Lawmakers Take Questions To Heart

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 5:18 pm

U.S. lawmakers and judges are feeling some urgency to solve the same problem: how to stop sending people to jail simply for failing to pay court fines and fees, often because they're too poor to afford them. Policymakers react to a recent NPR investigation into the issue.

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