U.S. News

The Salt
1:59 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Low-Sodium Food Labels Woo, And Confuse, Consumers

Nutrition fact labels are good but confusing, consumers say.
iStockphoto.com

The general consensus is that food labels that advertise lower sodium are a good way to help people make more healthful choices. But after that, what we think those labels mean gets a bit fuzzy, according to a new study.

Nutrition researchers were wondering just how we interpret the various sodium-related claims slapped on food packages: claims like "low in sodium" but also how a food product will reducing the risk of disease like hypertension, or "help lower blood pressure."

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Vatican Reaffirms Plan To Scrutinize U.S. Nuns

Nuns worship following a Mass for the election of a new pope at St. Patrick's Cathedral in February.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Pope Francis' doctrinal chief has reaffirmed the Vatican's intention to overhaul the largest organization of U.S. nuns, dashing the hopes of some that the newly installed pontiff would take a more conciliatory approach than his predecessor.

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Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Boston Globe Columnist: 'A Little Bit Of Freedom Taken Away'

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. We are so saddened and outraged by the bombings yesterday at the Boston Marathon - we're going to start the show, today, with a brief call to Dan Shaughnessy, a Boston Globe sports columnist who's covered many of the Boston Marathons. He's been named Massachusetts Sportswriter of the Year eight times and seven times has been voted one of America's top 10 sports columnists by AP sports editors.

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History
10:25 am
Tue April 16, 2013

'Letter From Birmingham Jail' 50 Years Later

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Today marks the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s letter from Birmingham jail. Dr. King penned this letter as a response to white clergymen who called his campaign of non-violent protests, quote, "unwise and untimely," unquote, and had urged him not to intervene in Alabama's segregationist policies.

Here is a clip of Dr. King reading part of the letter that he wrote in response.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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News
10:25 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Former Terror Expert: 'Very Confident' Case Will Be Solved

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to start the program today by talking about the bombings that shook Boston yesterday afternoon. Today, civic leaders are trying to find out what happened, but also to help their citizens heal. Here's Boston's mayor, Thomas Menino, at a press conference this morning.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

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Religion
10:25 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Faith Community Comforts Bostonians

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Joining us now is the Right Reverend Gayle Harris. She is suffragan bishop of the Episcopal diocese of Massachusetts. Welcome to you. Thank you so much for joining us.

REVEREND GAYLE HARRIS: Thank you for having me.

MARTIN: How are you seeing faith communities across the city and the state react to this?

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Around the Nation
10:25 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Single Moms Make It Work

In this week's segment on parenting, host Michel Martin talks to three single moms to find out what they've learned by raising children alone. Martin is joined by Lori Gottlieb who wrote about single parenting for Working Mother magazine, Stacia Brown, blogger at Beyond Baby Mamas, and regular 'Moms' contributor Aracely Panameno.

The Two-Way
8:59 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Oklahoma City Marathon Will Proceed, Organizers Say After Boston Attack

Oklahoma City officials say that a marathon that's part of memorial events honoring the anniversary of the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building will take place Friday. Here, Boy Scouts take part in the 2010 event.
Brett Deering Getty Images

News of the deadly bombing attack on the Boston Marathon is echoing in Oklahoma City, where residents will observe the 18th anniversary Friday of the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, which killed 168 people. The events include a marathon, which remains on the schedule, although officials say they will review their security plans.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
8:47 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Investigating The Boston Marathon Bombings

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 12:04 pm

Morning Edition co-hosts Steve Inskeep and David Greene discuss the investigation of Monday's Boston Marathon explosions with Roger Cressey, a former counterterrorism investigator and member of the National Security Council, and NPR's Dina Temple-Raston.

Shots - Health News
8:35 am
Tue April 16, 2013

How To Avoid A Colonoscopy Billing Kerfuffle

Before your doctor gets to this, make sure he'll bill the colonoscopy as a screening test rather than a diagnostic one.
Sebastian Schroeder iStockphoto.com

Where preventive health care is concerned, a colonoscopy is one of the pricier screening tests, with a cost that often exceeds $1,000.

But under the health care overhaul, most health insurance plans have to cover the test for colorectal cancer without billing patients a dime, even if a polyp is found and removed.

Yet the way your doctor categorizes the test can make all the difference.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
6:23 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Boston Doctors Compare Marathon Bomb Injuries To War Wounds

Medical personnel work outside the medical tent in the aftermath of two explosions near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday. At area hospitals, doctors say they were confronted with the kinds of injuries U.S. troops get in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 9:26 am

Boston hospitals always staff up their emergency rooms on Marathon Day to care for runners with cramps, dehydration and the occasional heart attack.

But Monday, those hospitals suddenly found themselves with more than 100 traumatized patients — many of them with the kinds of injuries seen more often on a battlefield than a marathon.

Like most big-city hospitals these days, Tufts Medical Center runs regular disaster drills, featuring simulated patients smeared with fake blood.

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The Two-Way
6:06 am
Tue April 16, 2013

The Cruelest Month: Boston Blasts Join List Of Dark Incidents

Oklahoma City Bombing: The Albert P. Murrah Federal Building shows the devastation caused by a fuel and fertilizer truck bomb on April 19, 1995. The blast killed 168 people and injured more than 500.
Bob Daemmrich AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 11:04 am

Howard Berkes is an NPR correspondent based in Salt Lake City.

It may have been the dumbest thing I ever said. On April 19, 1999, I stood before an audience at Idaho State University in Pocatello, talking about the cruelest month. April, I pointed out, and April 19 in particular, have provided celebrated, infamous and sometimes horrific moments in our history.

What was it about the month, I wondered, or the time of year, that made April so meaningful and at times so cruel? Back then, the list was relatively short:

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The Two-Way
4:28 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Boston Marathon Explosions: Latest Developments

A marathon runner, wrapped in a blanket to stay warm after the race, watched Monday as authorities investigated the bombings that shook the finish line area at the Boston Marathon. At least three people were killed and dozens were wounded.
Nicolaus Czarnecki Barcroft Media /Landov

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 4:59 am

The day after two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, investigators began to unravel some of the details of what happened, and we began to learn about the lives of the three people who were killed.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Richard DesLauriers said that they believed the devices used in the attack may have been pressure-cooker bombs stuffed with BBs and nails. Investigators said the bombs may have been left inside nylon bags or backpacks.

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Law
1:52 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Adoption Case Brings Rare Family Law Dispute To High Court

This October 2011 photo provided by Melanie Capobianco shows her adoptive daughter, Veronica, trick-or-treating in Charleston, S.C. The child has been the focus of a custody battle between her adoptive parents and her birth father.
Courtesy of Melanie Capobianco AP

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 12:04 pm

Take the usual agony of an adoption dispute. Add in the disgraceful U.S. history of ripping Indian children from their Native American families. Mix in a dose of initial fatherly abandonment. And there you have it — a poisonous and painful legal cocktail that goes before the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday.

At issue is the reach of the Indian Child Welfare Act, known as ICWA. The law was enacted in 1978 to protect Native American tribes from having their children almost literally stolen away and given to non-Indian adoptive or foster parents.

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The Two-Way
5:17 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Online Tools Help People Connect After Boston Marathon Bombing

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 3:21 am

Even as the shock and horror of the deadly explosions at the Boston Marathon had yet to subside Monday, people were turning to online tools to check on the safety of their friends and family who were at the event. The latest estimates of the casualties include more than 3 dozen people injured, with two dead.

As has been the case in previous calamities, Google and the Red Cross helped to connect people with runners, spectators, and volunteers who were at the race.

Here are several tools that came into use today:

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The Two-Way
4:28 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Boston Blasts Lead To Heightened Security Elsewhere

U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Park Police officers stand guard on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House Monday. Security there was tightened after at least two explosions went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 3:23 am

Monday's explosions in Boston have led to heightened security elsewhere, with New York, Washington and Los Angeles among the cities taking action within hours of the blasts.

"We're stepping up security at hotels and other prominent locations in the city through deployment of the NYPD's critical response vehicles until more about the explosion is learned," Paul J. Browne, the deputy commissioner of the New York Police Department, .

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U.S.
4:06 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

A Runner Describes The Scene

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 8:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Peter Sagal, the host of the NPR News quiz program, WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME, ran in the Boston Marathon today and he joins us now. Peter, how close were you to the explosions?

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U.S.
4:06 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

An Update On The Boston Marathon Explosions

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 8:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. We begin this hour with the horrific story unfolding today out of Boston. Just over four hours into the Boston Marathon, two explosions ripped into a crowd of onlookers and runners not far from the finish line. Boston Police have confirmed at least two people dead, and 23 injured. Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick spoke just moments ago, along with the city's police commissioner, Ed Davis.

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Law
4:06 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Supreme Court Weighs Patenting Of Human Genes

Medical geneticist Dr. Harry Ostrer (center) talks to the press outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday. The court heard oral arguments on the highly charged question of whether human genes can be patented.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 6:44 am

In a case considered pivotal to the future of science and medicine, the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court seemed skeptical Monday about a claim that human genes can be patented.

Contending that genes can be patented are the biotech and pharmaceutical industries, which see patents as the keys to new scientific exploration. On the other side are doctors, patients and many scientists, who see gene patents as an attempt to monopolize and block future exploration in the new universe of genetics.

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U.S.
4:06 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Latest On Boston Marathon Explosions

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 8:02 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Anne Mostue is a reporter from member station WGBH, in Boston. She was there, covering the race, at the time of the explosions, and she joins us now. And Anne, where were you, exactly, when these bombs went off?

ANNE MOSTUE, BYLINE: I'm - I was a block away, just on Newbury Street, which is parallel to Boylston - where those bombs went off.

BLOCK: And what did you hear? What did you see?

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The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Witnesses To Marathon Explosions Describe Panic And Horror

An injured man is loaded into an ambulance after two explosions during the 117th Boston Marathon near Copley Square on Monday.
Jim Rogash Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 7:33 am

People near the finish line of the Boston Marathon described horrific scenes of the chaos that followed two loud explosions in quick succession this afternoon, sending spectators rushing away from the scene in panic as others lay bloodied and wounded on the ground.

One witness, Aaron Michael told member station WGBH that he heard first one explosion and then another.

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It's All Politics
3:44 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Background Checks Bill Gains Backers On And Off Capitol Hill

Newly made AR-15 rifles at Stag Arms in New Britain, Conn., last Wednesday.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 4:38 pm

The Senate was due on Tuesday to take up legislation embodying the bipartisan compromise reached by two senators, West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin and Pennsylvania Republican Pat Toomey.

The effort to extend background checks to weapons purchases at gun shows and online received a boost over the weekend when an important gun rights group, the Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms, announced its support for the measure.

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Around the Nation
2:46 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Exoneree Detectives Fight For Those Still Behind Bars

Dallas exonerees Christopher Scott (center) and Richard Miles, accompanied by Scott's girlfriend, Kelly Gindratt, prepare to be honored in the state Capitol in Austin, Texas, in March.
Courtesy of Jamie Meltzer Freedom Fighters Documentary

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 7:35 am

Christopher Scott, Johnnie Lindsey and Billy Smith drive down a desolate highway toward a prison in East Texas. They've all been there before, serving hard time — 63 years among the three of them.

But this time it's different. They're driving a Hummer. They're dressed to the nines. And they're on a mission. They aim to get an inmate out — a friend of Scott's named Jimmy O'Steen, aka Big O. But this will be a slow-motion prison break. Scott, Lindsey and Smith are all exonerated prisoners.

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The Salt
2:33 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

A Tax Day Story For Hard Cider Lovers

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 3:06 pm

Is small-batch hard apple cider the next microbrew? It seems everybody and their brother is experimenting with ways to make the potent stuff profitable. Sales of domestically produced hard cider have more than tripled since 2007, according to beverage industry analysts — and that's not counting Europe, where it has held a steady popularity for centuries.

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

2013 Pulitzers Honor Sharon Olds, Adam Johnson, New York Times

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 7:37 am

The new batch of Pulitzer Prize winners has just been announced, with novelist Adam Johnson winning the fiction prize with The Orphan Master's Son. The winners of the prizes for Americans' best work in journalism, drama, music, and writing also receive a $10,000 cash award.

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U.S.
1:55 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Explosions Rock Finish Line At Boston Marathon

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
3:31 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Mars Rovers Go Quiet, As Sun Blocks Transmissions

The rover Curiosity and other NASA spacecraft at Mars are now in a radio blackout, as the sun is interfering with transmissions. Curiosity took this self-portrait by combining 66 exposures in February.
NASA

Communications between the Earth and Mars are on hiatus for several weeks, thanks to interference from the sun. That means NASA's orbiters and rovers that study Mars will be left to their own devices until radio signals can once again travel between the two planets.

Known as "solar conjunction," the problem arises when the orbit of planets places the sun directly between them.

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Around the Nation
2:52 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Pastor, Mentor And Social Activist: Remembering Gordon Cosby

The Rev. Gordon Cosby died March 20 at 95.
Courtesy of Church of the Saviour

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 3:25 pm

When the Rev. Gordon Cosby founded Church of the Saviour in the late 1940s, it was one of the first interracial churches in the still-segregated District of Columbia. Cosby, who died last month at the age of 95, is remembered not only for his work as a pastor, but also for his commitment to social change.

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The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Beer Bust: Yankees Rename 'Craft Beer' Stand At Stadium

The New York Yankees' "Craft Beer Destination" met with derision online, after fans noted the beers were all MillerCoors products — and one of them is a cider. The stand now has a new title, the "Beer Mixology Destination."
Amanda Rykoff

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 1:39 pm

The baseball season is still young, but the New York Yankees have already faced harsh public criticism. No, we're not referring to their lackluster record. Instead, the Yanks were accused of trying to hoodwink beer drinkers with a new "Craft Beer Destination" concession stand at their Bronx stadium.

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The Two-Way
10:50 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Violence Hits Guantanamo Bay, As Inmates Continue Hunger Strikes

A view of the the U.S. Naval Station base in Guantanamo Bay Cuba. Guards and prisoners fought Saturday, as inmates were moved into individual cells instead of communal housing.
Suzette Laboy AP

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 11:06 am

Inmates fought guards at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after military authorities decided to end communal housing in one of the prison's camps, and instead put prisoners in individual cells. At least one detainee was reportedly injured by a rubber bullet in the clash Saturday.

The violence began after the facility's commander ordered the move Saturday morning. According to the U.S. Southern Command, the decision was made after detainees covered windows and surveillance cameras, limiting guards' ability to monitor them at all times.

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