U.S. News

Around the Nation
6:04 am
Sat June 14, 2014

Obama Takes A Trip To A Sioux Indian Reservation

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 10:12 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

President Obama visited the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation yesterday on the border between North and South Dakota. At a celebration honoring Native American veterans, he quoted the tribe's best-known member - Chief Sitting Bull.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: He said, let's put our minds together to see what we can build for our children.

(APPLAUSE)

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Around the Nation
6:04 am
Sat June 14, 2014

Town Shoots For Tacky World Record In Duck Tape Festival

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 10:12 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This weekend, the 11 annual Duct Tape Festival in Avon, Ohio, where Duct Tape - which is a brand of duct, with a T, tape - is manufactured. The festival is held to celebrate and spotlight just about anything you can make with duct tape, and what you can make may surprise you. We're going to go now to Mel Rainey, who is an art teacher at Elyria High School in Avon, Ohio. Thanks for being with us, Mr. Rainey.

MEL RAINEY: No problem - any time.

SIMON: So your students have been building a float for five months?

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Politics
6:04 am
Sat June 14, 2014

Cantor's Defeat Was Local, But Reverberations Are National

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 10:12 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Sergeant Bergdahl is back on U.S. soil, and the controversy over President Obama's decision to trade with the Taliban for his release continues as events in Iraq bring a new challenge. Here to talk about the week in politics is NPR's Ron Elving. He joins us now from member station KPLU in Seattle in what they like to call the real Washington - Washington State. Ron, thanks so much for being with us.

RON ELVING, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Scott.

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National Security
6:04 am
Sat June 14, 2014

After Isolation, Bergdahl Likely Faces A Long Recovery

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 10:12 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. And I'm Scott Simon. Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl has returned to the United States. He's at the Brooke Army Medical Hospital in San Antonio, Texas as new details of his imprisonment by the Taliban continue to emerge. Fox News is reporting that Sergeant Bergdahl spent the last two years in solitary confinement. From San Antonio, NPR's Wade Goodwin has more on this story.

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The Two-Way
3:48 am
Sat June 14, 2014

A San Francisco 'Painted Lady' Sells For $900K Under Asking Price

Michael Shannon, 66, bought the green Queen Anne Victorian on the corner in 1975 for $65,000.
_tar0_ Flickr

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 7:38 am

The largest and oldest house of San Francisco's seven "Painted Ladies," which anchors the corner of "Postcard Row," has finally been sold for $3.1 million, $900k below its original asking price.

The house was originally put on the market in 2010, and was removed after several price reductions. In March, it was put on the market again.

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Law
3:45 am
Sat June 14, 2014

Despite Death Penalty Repeal, Conn. Hands Down A Death Sentence

Richard Roszkowski, convicted of murdering three people in 2006, listens during his sentencing in Bridgeport, Conn., in May. Connecticut is one of three states that has eliminated the death penalty only for crimes committed after the repeal took effect.
Brian A. Pounds AP

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 10:12 am

On Sept. 7, 2006, Richard Roszkowski chased after a 9-year-old girl named Kylie Flannery. He shot her three times, ultimately killing her, as well as two adults.

Last month, a Connecticut judge sentenced Roszkowski to death for the crimes — despite the fact that the state eliminated the death penalty in 2012.

"This is a terrible sentence," Judge John Blawie said at the sentencing hearing. "But it is in truth, sir, a sentence you wrote for yourself on Sept. 7, 2006."

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Shots - Health News
4:35 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Cancer When You're Young Isn't Always 'The Fault In Our Stars'

In The Fault in Our Stars, Gus and Hazel, played by Ansel Elgort and Shailene Woodley, play two teenagers with cancer.
James Bridges AP

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 10:55 am

It's hard not to be charmed by Hazel and Gus, the flippant yet noble teenagers with cancer in the hit film The Fault in Our Stars. But movies have a bad habit of taking life-or-death health crises and turning them into cliché.

To find out if The Fault in Our Stars stayed true, we called on the experts – people who have had cancer as teenagers and young adults. Not surprisingly, most of them have read the book and seen the movie.

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Education
3:25 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

A Campus Dilemma: Sure, 'No' Means 'No,' But Exactly What Means 'Yes'?

Many colleges are grappling with how to define consensual sexual activity between students. Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, mandates that students get verbal permission before making any sexual advance.
Peggy Turbett The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 4:23 pm

As the federal government presses colleges to improve the way they handle cases of sexual assault, schools are turning their focus to defining "consent" — how to distinguish between activity that's consensual and activity that's not.

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It's All Politics
2:58 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

4 Takeaways From Hillary Clinton's 'Fresh Air' Interview

Hillary Clinton promotes her new book, Hard Choices, in Chicago on Wednesday. The former senator and secretary of state had a lively and much-talked-about chat this week with Fresh Air's Terry Gross.
Stacy Thacker AP

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 8:28 pm

So when exactly did Hillary Clinton change her mind on same-sex marriage? That question was left unanswered in the former secretary of state's lively exchange with Fresh Air host Terry Gross.

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The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Cliffhanger: Authorities Set Fire To House Teetering On The Brink

A house is deliberately set on fire Friday, days after part of the ground it was resting on collapsed into Lake Whitney, Texas.
Brandon Wade Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 5:02 pm

Robb and Jenyce Webb are definitely regretting the day they bought waterfront property on Lake Whitney.

They paid about $700,000 for an idyllic cliff-side home south of Fort Worth, Texas, two years ago, where they hoped to live out their retirement years. But sometime last year, their dreams began to (literally) crumble.

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Code Switch
2:28 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

An Opera Remembers The Tragedy Of An Asian-American Soldier

Andrew Stenson plays Pvt. Danny Chen in An American Soldier, a new opera about the hazing and death of the Chinese-American soldier from New York City.
Sarah Tilotta NPR

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 10:34 am

About two years ago, playwright David Henry Hwang turned down an offer to write a play about the brief life and suicide of Army Pvt. Danny Chen.

But an opera? He couldn't refuse.

"This is a story with big emotions, big primary colors in a way, and big plot events," says Hwang, who wrote the libretto for An American Soldier, a new hourlong opera commissioned by Washington National Opera.

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The Two-Way
2:23 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Chicago 'Heroin Highway' Bust Shows A 'New Face Of Organized Crime'

Authorities say the drug operation allowed customers to pay at one location, pick up the heroin at another and be back on the expressway within minutes.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 3:56 pm

Authorities say they've broken up a major heroin and crack cocaine distribution ring in Chicago.

A joint federal and local task force that includes the DEA, FBI, Chicago police and other law enforcement agencies arrested and charged more than two dozen gang members who allegedly supplied a significant amount of heroin to customers coming from the city and suburbs.

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Code Switch
2:21 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

For These Inner-City Dads, Fatherhood Comes With Homework

Edward Pitchford is a responsible-fatherhood specialist with the Center for Urban Families in Baltimore.
Courtesy of Carde Cornish

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 3:32 pm

About two dozen dads — all African-Americans, ranging in age from their early 20s to late 40s — are standing in a circle participating in a call-and-response exercise:

Call: You done broke them chains.
Response: From my body and my brain!
Call: But you was deaf, dumb and blind.
Response: 'Til I took back my mind!

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Around the Nation
2:11 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

One Drought Solution Is A Riddle: How Do You Make Water Run Uphill?

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 9:49 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

California's severe drought is inspiring some creative thinking. With farmland going dry in the Central Valley, water districts are proposing something that's never been tried during a drought. They want to move water uphill by reversing the state's main aqueduct. As Lauren Sommer reports from member station KQED, it'll take a serious engineering effort.

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Politics
2:11 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Cantor's Defeat Brings An End To Prickly Relationship With Obama

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 4:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block. There is no love lost at the White House for Eric Cantor, the number two Republican in the House, who lost his primary this week. The Virginia congressman has long been a roadblock for the president's legislative agenda. House Republicans will vote next week on who should replace Cantor as majority leader. NPR's Scott Horsley reports that while the players are changing, the partisan dynamic is likely to say the same.

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National Security
2:11 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

As Bergdahl Touches Down In Texas, Reintegration Begins

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 4:23 pm

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is back in the U.S. The former Taliban prisoner is now undergoing treatment at an Army hospital in San Antonio, Texas.

Iraq
2:11 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Obama Rules Out Ground Troops; What Else Can U.S. Do In Iraq?

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 4:23 pm

President Obama said that he will help the Iraqi military break the momentum of the militants on the march to Baghdad. The Pentagon said that one possible option could include airstrikes. But the president said that any military help must include political solutions from the Iraqi government, which has helped fuel the unrest by failing to reach out to its Sunni minority.

Shots - Health News
1:01 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

6 Questions About Contraception Coverage And The Supreme Court

Customers enter a Hobby Lobby store on March 25, in Antioch, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 6:06 am

One of the most watched issues before the Supreme Court this term may turn on the question of religious freedom. But it will also likely determine how women will be able to access a key provision of the Affordable Care Act – one seeking to guarantee no-cost prescription contraception in most health insurance plans.

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StoryCorps
1:04 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Remembering A Civil Rights Swim-In: 'It Was A Milestone'

In June 1964, James Brock dumped acid into the water at the Monson Motor Lodge in St. Augustine, Fla. He was trying to disrupt swimmers who were protesting the hotel's whites-only policy.
Bettmann Corbis

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 11:14 am

On June 18, 1964, black and white protesters jumped into the whites-only pool at the Monson Motor Lodge in St. Augustine, Fla. In an attempt to force them out, the owner of the hotel poured acid into the pool.

Martin Luther King Jr. had planned the sit-in during the St. Augustine Movement, a part of the larger civil rights movement. The protest — and the owner's acidic response — is largely forgotten today, but it played a role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act, now celebrating its 50th anniversary.

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It's All Politics
7:03 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Pew Poll: More Americans Are Political Purists

Voters cast ballots Tuesday at a Mount Pleasant, S.C., polling place for the state's primary election.
Bruce Smith AP

Maybe there's something in humans that pushes them apart the way plate tectonics moves continents. Whatever the reason, the ideological divide between conservatives and progressives in the U.S. has grown over the past decade, and not by a little, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center.

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The Two-Way
5:57 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Supreme Court: Inherited IRAs Not Protected From Bankruptcy

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 6:19 pm

The Supreme Court has ruled that individual retirement accounts (IRAs) that Americans inherit are not protected in bankruptcy proceedings.

When Heidi Heffron-Clark declared bankruptcy in October 2010, she and her husband claimed the IRA she inherited from her mother — then worth $300,000 — qualified as "retirement funds," meaning the couple could not be required to use it to pay debts they owed creditors.

But an inherited IRA differs in big ways from the type of IRA someone builds over the course of a working lifetime.

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The Salt
4:43 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

POM Wonderful Wins A Round In Food Fight With Coca-Cola

POM sued Coca-Cola, claiming that it was losing sales because the label and advertising for its Minute Maid pomegranate-blueberry drink were misleading consumers into believing they were getting a juice combination consisting mainly of pomegranate and blueberry juices when, in fact, the juice was more than 99 percent apple and grape juices, which are far cheaper.
Courtesy of the Coca-Cola Co.

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 10:47 am

A food fight at the U.S. Supreme Court ended in a unanimous decision on Thursday.

The justices ruled that POM Wonderful can go forward with a lawsuit alleging Coca-Cola Co. tricked consumers and stole business from POM with false and misleading juice labels.

The case centers on a product aimed at health-conscious consumers: pomegranate-blueberry juice.

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It's All Politics
4:41 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

The Big Numbers Behind Eric Cantor's Failed Primary Bid

Following his defeat in the Virginia GOP primary Tuesday, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor tells reporters he intends to resign his leadership post at the end of July.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 6:05 pm

The big numbers are in from House Majority Leader Eric Cantor's stunning primary loss to Tea Party candidate David Brat.

First of all, the vote totals: 36,120 votes for Brat; 28,902 for Cantor.

Cash raised: Between the start of 2013 and May 21, 2014, Cantor raised $4.7 million. Brat raised a bit less than $207,000.

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All Tech Considered
3:13 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Q&A: Nintendo President Says Don't Count Out Mario

Reggie Fils-Aime is president and chief operating officer of Nintendo of America.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 3:36 pm

The American face of Nintendo, President and Chief Operating Officer Reggie Fils-Aime, once said, "I'm about kicking ass, I'm about taking names."

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All Tech Considered
2:29 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Starbucks Makes Itself More Addictive With Wireless Phone Charging

Soon, you'll be able to recharge at Starbucks, and charge your device.
Courtesy of Duracell Powermat

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 9:11 am

Starbucks' latest innovation has nothing to do with coffee beans or breakfast, but it may lure the technologically dependent among us into its stores.

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Europe
2:02 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Are 'Color Revolutions' A New Front In U.S.-Russia Tensions?

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 5:43 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

U.S. relations with Russia are at their lowest point since the Cold War thanks to the crisis in Ukraine. Russian defense officials are talking about a new doctrine of subversive warfare between major world powers. They accuse the West of using popular uprisings to topple unfriendly governments. And some analysts say Moscow itself is employing that strategy in eastern Ukraine. More from NPR's Corey Flintoff.

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Law
2:02 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

The Jury Is Still Out On Why O.J. Simpson Was Acquitted

A demonstrator protests the verdict in the trial of four Los Angeles police officers accused of beating motorist Rodney King outside the Los Angeles Police Department.
Mike Nelson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 9:15 am

On June 12, 1994, the butchered bodies of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman were found on the front walkway of Simpson's condominium in Brentwood, an upscale section of Los Angeles. Within days, Brown's ex-husband, O.J. Simpson, was considered the prime suspect in the murder of both.

The year that followed was legendary in its cast of characters and legal maneuvering. The N-word. "If it does not fit, you must acquit." The dog howling in the night. Then, finally, the verdict.

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Research News
2:02 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Stark Report: Left-Right Divide Is At Its Worst In Recent Memory

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 5:43 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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The Two-Way
12:24 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

2 Weeks After Prisoner Exchange, Bergdahl Arrives In Texas

A video frame grab of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl released by the Voice of Jihad website shows the soldier during his captivity.
AP

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 2:25 am

This post was updated at 4:15 a.m. ET Friday:

U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has arrived at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio after a flight from Ramstein Air Base in Germany, according to a Pentagon spokesman. He will receive medical treatment and will be reunited with his family.

This post was updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

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Shots - Health News
11:14 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Teen Smoking Hits A 22-Year Low, But Other Tobacco Uses Rise

A teenager finishes her cigarette in Boston's Back Bay neighborhood.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Cigarette smoking among U.S. high school students has dropped to the lowest level in 22 years, federal health officials reported Thursday.

The percentage of students who reported smoking a cigarette at least one day in the last 30 days fell to 15.7 percent in 2013, according to the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a large federal survey that has been tracking youth smoking since 1991.

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