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Next week marks the 70th anniversary of one of the worst disasters in U.S. Naval history — and one of the worst shark attacks on record. But it's a story that many people don't know.

In the summer of 1945, World War II was almost over, but in the shadows of that moment comes a story of survival that changed lives forever.

If you're a movie fan, you may recognize this line from the 1975 blockbuster, Jaws: "Japanese submarine slammed two torpedoes into our side, Chief. We was coming back from the island of Tinian to Leyte. Just delivered the bomb."

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Obama Wraps Up Trip To Kenya

Jul 26, 2015
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Twenty-five years ago today, President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act on the White House lawn with this promise.

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In this installment of NPR's series Inside Alzheimer's, we hear from Greg O'Brien about losing his sense of taste and smell, and how he's learning there's much more to a good meal than food. O'Brien, a longtime journalist in Cape Cod, Mass., was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease in 2009.

Deaths from lightning strikes are up sharply this year, according to the National Weather Service. Here are some myths about lightning, or avoiding it, and tips on how to actually stay safe.

This story initially aired on July 17, 2015 on Morning Edition.

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A federal judge has ruled that hundreds of women and children who were detained after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border should be released because their detention violates a 1997 court settlement that prohibits minors from being held in unlicensed, secure facilities.

Updated at 7:20 p.m.

Hillary Clinton is set to testify before a House committee investigating the Sept. 11, 2012 deaths of four Americans, including a U.S. ambassador, in Benghazi, Libya, according to her campaign.

Campaign spokesman Nick Merrill said the Democratic presidential candidate would appear on Oct. 22, but Reuters, quoting a committee statement, said the date of her testimony was still being negotiated.

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

President Obama and Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta discussed strengthening cooperation in the fight against extremists, particularly al-Qaida-linked extremists based in neighboring Somalia.

On the first full day of an officials visit to Kenya — his first since becoming president — Obama said at a joint news conference that the threat from al-Shabab "was an extensive topic of conversation" in private meetings between the two leaders.

Updated at 1:10 p.m. ET

The Defense Department, reacting to armed citizens appearing in front of military recruiting offices around the country since last week's fatal shootings of five U.S. servicemen in Chattanooga, Tenn., has asked that "individuals not stand guard" on federal property.

New York state recently announced an increase in the minimum wage for fast food workers, to $15 an hour. It's the fruit of a three-year labor campaign.

Should the president of the Navajo Nation be required to speak fluent Navajo?

The Navajo Nation held a referendum on that question this week, and the majority voted no.

The vote was victory for supporters of a Navajo presidential candidate who was disqualified last fall because he didn't speak the language fluently. The next Navajo Nation election is in 2018.

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Three terminally ill patients lost a court battle in California Friday over whether they should have the right to request and take lethal medication to hasten their deaths.

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Convicted spy Jonathan Pollard could be released from prison after serving 30 years of his life sentence.

NPR's Carrie Johnson reports that he will be eligible for parole in November. "Under the laws in place at the time [of his sentencing], Pollard is eligible for parole unless he's acted up in prison or likely to commit another crime," she says.

Pollard, 60, was arrested in 1985 and eventually was convicted of espionage for conspiring to pass national defense information to Israel. Carrie reports that the Israeli government has repeatedly pushed for his release.

A new study of veterans from the Vietnam War has troubling implications for troops who fought much more recently — in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The study suggests that 40 years since the Vietnam War ended, hundreds of thousands of those vets still struggle every day with mental health problems linked to the traumas they experienced. It was published in the latest issue of JAMA Psychiatry.

New York state has some of the toughest gun laws in the country. Compliance with those laws is another matter.

New York passed a broad package of gun regulations after the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., despite the objections of hunters and gun rights advocates. Now it appears that many gun owners are refusing to comply with a key provision that requires the registration of so-called assault weapons.

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After last night's shooting in Lafayette, La., Governor Bobby Jindal also said this...

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As California's drought drags on, its almond industry has come under scrutiny. As you've probably heard by now, almonds use a lot of water — about one gallon per nut. Most growers are relying on groundwater even more this year, because their surface water has been cut off. But that brings a different problem all together: too much salt.

Not the salt added to make roasted almonds savory, but salt in groundwater – which is killing trees.

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And let's turn now to our Friday political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times. Good to see you both.

DAVID BROOKS: Good to see you.

E.J. DIONNE: Good to see you.

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