U.S. News

Parallels
1:35 am
Tue July 8, 2014

As Wire Transfer Options Dwindle, Somali-Americans Fear A Lost Lifeline

A money changer sits behind piles of banknotes in Hargeisa in Somaliland, an autonomous, relatively peaceful region in northern Somalia. The self-declared nation of Somaliland, like Somalia itself, lacks a formal banking system, and residents rely on hawaladars to receive money from abroad.
Simon Maina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 8:51 am

Somali-Americans may soon find it harder to provide economic support to their homeland: One of the last banks to facilitate cash transfers to Somalia is getting out of the business.

As the East African country faces a potential drought and famine this summer, those cash transfers might grow even more important. That's why the Somali-American community in Minnesota — the largest in the U.S. — is lobbying Washington to find a way to keep the cash lifeline intact.

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It's All Politics
6:23 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

In Mississippi, The GOP's Not-So-Civil War Continues

Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran (center) may have scored the equivalent of a winning political touchdown in the Republican primary last month, but Chris McDaniel, who lost, still wants to see the replay.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

It's been 13 days since Sen. Thad Cochran, by most accounts, won Mississippi's Republican primary over Tea Party challenger Chris McDaniel, with African-American Democrats largely providing the 6,800-vote margin of victory out of some 375,000 votes cast.

But as of Monday, McDaniel still hadn't conceded, and your guess is as good as anyone's as to when — or even if — he ever will.

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The Two-Way
4:54 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Washington State To Start Recreational Pot Sales On Tuesday

Amber McGowan, left, and Krystal Klacsan work Monday at Cannabis City in Seattle, a day before the store is to begin legal pot sales on Tuesday. The store will be for now the only one in Seattle to sell recreational marijuana.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 6:46 pm

Legal marijuana sales are set to begin in Washington state as early as Tuesday after authorities began issuing retail licenses to stores.

The state's Liquor Control Board issued Monday the first 24 marijuana retailer licenses, the board said in a statement. The stores can now stock up on marijuana products and begin sales on Tuesday after the mandated 24-hour "quarantine" period.

Here's more from the panel:

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Men In America
3:45 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Teen Tries To Be The Parent His Own Dad Never Was

Marvin Ramos, now 18, was overwhelmed when his daughter, Hailey, was born. But now he says he's determined to be the best father he can be. "I haven't run away," he says, "and I never want to."
Marvin Ramos Courtesy of WNYC

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 6:40 pm

This story is part of All Things Considered's "Men in America" series.

Marvin Ramos found out he was going to be a father when his girlfriend, Stephanie, called him during a basketball game. He says he sat down on a bench and looked up at the sky. He was 16. Stephanie was 19.

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The Salt
2:39 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Couple Revives Lost Moroccan Fig Liquor, One Bottle At A Time

Bottles of mahia in the Nahmias et Fils distillery.
Alex Schmidt for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 5:56 pm

Before the crowds descend on the Whisky Jewbilee, a kosher alcohol tasting event in Manhattan, David and Dorit Nahmias stand behind their vendor table, getting psyched up.

"This is like the big game," Dorit Nahmias says.

Events like these are a key tool for getting the word out about their tiny distillery, and the Nahmiases attend half a dozen of them per year. The product they're trying to sell is one few people have heard of: mahia. Dorit rehearses her pitch:

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Politics
2:38 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

In Maine, A Gay Candidate With An Uneven Record On LGBT Rights

Democratic Rep. Mike Michaud speaks at the Pride Parade and Festival in Portland, Maine, on June 21. Michaud, who is openly gay, is running for governor with the backing of national LGBT groups.
Susan Sharon NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 5:56 pm

Maine was among the first states to legalize same-sex marriage at the ballot box — and now, LGBT groups are hoping voters there will break new ground by electing the nation's first openly gay governor in November.

But Democratic candidate Mike Michaud only recently came out, and he hasn't always been a gay-rights supporter.

Responding to what he called a "whisper campaign" about his sexual orientation, the six-term congressman did something dramatic last November: He outed himself in a series of newspaper op-eds.

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All Tech Considered
2:29 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

We Asked, You Answered: Going To Extremes To Disconnect On Vacation

Our readers wrote in on how they tried to take a vacation from their smartphones.
Christian Wheatley iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 5:56 pm

Summer is a great time to take a break from some of the stressors in our lives. For many of us, that stress is brought on by too much screen time and the pressure to stay connected.

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Around the Nation
2:23 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

A Red July 4th Weekend Leaves Dozens Of Casualties In Chicago

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 5:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Chicago, there were many shootings over the July 4 weekend. Police say nine Chicago residents were killed; more than 50 were injured. At least eight people who were shot were shot by police. NPR's Cheryl Corley reports.

CHERYL CORLEY, BYLINE: Chicago police superintendent Garry McCarthy says his department had a plan over the July 4 holiday that included putting hundreds of more officers on the city streets when and where they were needed.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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The Two-Way
2:15 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

More Than 50 People Were Shot In Chicago Over The Holiday Weekend

Police investigate the scene of a shooting at 75th Street and Stewart Avenue on Saturday in Chicago. At least 50 people were shot in the city, nine of them fatally, in a wave of violence over the Fourth of July weekend.
E. Jason Wambsgans MCT /Landov

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 3:15 pm

At least 50 people were shot in Chicago, 12 of them fatally, in a wave of violence over the long Fourth of July holiday weekend.

The Chicago Tribune called it "the greatest burst of gun violence Chicago has seen this year."

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Law
2:07 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

New Numbers Show Significant Drop In Deportations Of Minors

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 5:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Code Switch
12:23 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Asian-American Leadership Programs Tackle The 'Bamboo Ceiling'

Former Cisco Vice President Buck Gee speaks at the Advance Leadership Program for Asian-American Executives at Stanford University in 2011.
Dai Sugano/San Jose Mercury News MCT/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 8:28 am

In the last few pages of a recent issue of The Economist, we spotted an advertisement for a leadership program specifically for Asian-American executives. The program charges $11,000 in tuition for a five-day session at Stanford Graduate School of Business.

The purpose, says co-founder Buck Gee, is to provide companies with an "immediate solution" to tackle the lack of Asian-Americans in leadership roles.

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News
11:15 am
Mon July 7, 2014

In California Town, Protests Shed Light On National Immigration Debate

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:44 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We'll start today by talking about immigration and the crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border. We've been reporting on the search of illegal border crossings, particularly of unaccompanied children. And we're talking about how federal authorities have been scrambling to shelter these would-be migrants and meet the demands of the law for evaluating each person's circumstances.

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Shots - Health News
1:18 am
Mon July 7, 2014

For Many Americans, Stress Takes A Toll On Health And Family

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:14 am

Stress is part of the human condition, unavoidable and even necessary to a degree. But too much stress can be toxic — even disabling.

And there's a lot of toxic stress out there.

A national poll done by NPR with our partners at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health finds that more than 1 in every 4 Americans say they had a great deal of stress in the previous month.

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The Salt
1:17 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Raw Milk Producers Aim To Regulate Themselves

Charlotte Smith, of Champoeg Creamery in St. Paul, Ore., says raw milk may offer health benefits. But she also acknowledges its very real dangers.
Courtesy of Champoeg Creamery

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:45 am

A growing number of Americans are buying raw milk. That's milk that has not been pasteurized to kill bacteria.

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National Security
1:16 am
Mon July 7, 2014

The Marines Are Looking For A Few Good (Combat-Ready) Women

Sgt. Jarrod Simmons speaks to his squad of Marines before they head out on a training march with 55-pound packs on Feb. 22, 2013, at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Marines and the other military branches must open combat jobs to women in 2016. More than 160 female Marines are taking part in a grueling training program that begins this summer.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 7:51 am

The challenge for the Marines, and for the Army, is how to open up ground combat jobs to women in January 2016, without lowering standards.

And here's where things stand in the Marines.

Eighty-five female Marines already made it through an infantry training course last fall at Camp Lejeune, N.C., which included drills such as attacking a mock enemy force, hidden in a pine forest. That course lasted eight weeks, and the men and women all completed the same training.

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Around the Nation
4:56 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Programs Target Poverty In Obama's 5 'Promise Zones'

People line up at the FamilySource Center in Los Angeles, an organization in one of President Obama's five designated "Promise Zones" that aims to help fight poverty in the area.
Priska Neely NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 9:02 am

Five areas across the country have been designated as "Promise Zones" by the federal government. These zones, announced by President Obama in January, are intended to tackle poverty by focusing on individual urban neighborhoods and rural areas.

In the five Promise Zones — located in Philadelphia, San Antonio, southeastern Kentucky, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and Los Angeles — the idea is to basically carpet-bomb the neighborhoods with programs like after-school classes, GED courses and job training to turn those areas around.

What Happens In The Zone?

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U.S.
3:05 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Increasing Use Of Oil Trains Inspires Backlash From States

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 10:18 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Law
1:12 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Rare Unanimity In Supreme Court Term, With Plenty Of Fireworks

The recent Supreme Court term resulted in an unusual number of unanimous decisions — but that doesn't mean there wasn't disagreement.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:10 pm

The nation greets the coming of July each year with fireworks on the National Mall and, days earlier, explosive decisions at the U.S. Supreme Court.

While the Mall fireworks dissipate within moments, the court's decisions will have repercussions for decades. Indeed, no sooner was the ink dry on this term's contraception decision than the court's three female justices accused their male colleagues of reneging.

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The Two-Way
12:55 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

California Highway Patrol Probing Videotaped Beating Of Woman

In this July 1 image from video provided by motorist David Diaz, a California Highway Patrol officer straddles a woman while punching her on the shoulder of a Los Angeles freeway.
David Diaz AP

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 4:14 pm

The California Highway Patrol says it is investigating a video that shows an officer repeatedly punching a woman after trying to stop her from walking into traffic.

As Reuters notes: "The video, which was taken by a passing motorist, posted online and broadcast by local television stations, has caused an outcry from community activists who say the officer used excessive force in the arrest on Tuesday."

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Report: Most NSA-Intercepted Data From 'Ordinary Internet Users'

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 4:50 pm

A Washington Post analysis of data provided by Edward Snowden has revealed that nine out of 10 communications intercepted by the National Security Agency were from ordinary Internet users, not legally targeted foreigners. But the examination also showed that officials gleaned valuable intelligence from the wide net the agency cast.

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Around the Nation
5:55 am
Sun July 6, 2014

First Responders Unprepared For Another Train Disaster

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Ever since that Canadian train derailment, first responders all across North America wonder, what if it happens here? And as NPR's David Schaper reports from this side of the border, many say they don't have the training, the equipment or the manpower necessary to respond to an oil train disaster in their cities and towns.

DAVID SCHAPER, BYLINE: The images of that fiery blast that incinerated much of Lac-Megantic's downtown last summer still haunt many first responders.

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Around the Nation
5:55 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Keeping Time By Rubidium At The Naval Observatory

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

We're spending part of our summer stargazing. And this week, as part of our series looking at the heavens, we went to the U.S. Naval Observatory, which sits on high ground, overlooking most of Washington. You're probably already familiar with what it does.

(SOUNDBITE OF RECORDED MESSAGE)

FRED COVINGTON: U.S. Naval Observatory Master Clock. At the tone, the Eastern daylight time - 14 hours, 20 minutes exactly. Universal time...

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Governing
5:55 am
Sun July 6, 2014

New IRS Chief John Koskinen: 'I Enjoy A Crisis'

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 3:25 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Strange News
3:16 am
Sun July 6, 2014

It's A Nice Day For A Flash Wedding

Jennifer Miller and Michael Bennett were married at the Smithsonian Natural History museum in Washington, D.C., using PopWed Co.
Maggie Winters PopWed Co.

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:50 am

You've heard of pop-up restaurants, flash mobs and other hipster happenings. Now comes a pair of entrepreneurs in Washington, D.C., offering pop-up weddings for those who want to elope, but do it with flair.

Locations are never booked ahead of time, planning is minimal and fingers are crossed that you and your partner don't get asked to leave before you are pronounced husband and wife, or wife and wife.

PopWed Co., which started last January, procures the wedding license, chooses a creative location, takes the photographs and performs the ceremony.

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Law
3:42 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

More Municipalities Deny Federal Requests, Won't Detain Immigrants

Philadelphia City Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez pushed for the city to change its practice of detaining immigrants on behalf of federal officials.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 8:42 am

Before immigrants get deported, they are sometimes held temporarily by local law enforcement at the request of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE. But cities across the country, including Philadelphia, are saying they will no longer fully cooperate with that plan.

Offenses including traffic stops and felonies can lead to deportation for immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally — or even those who are legal permanent residents. ICE requests that municipalities hold suspects until they can be transferred into federal custody.

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U.S.
3:14 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Court System Not Equipped For Deluge Of Underage Immigrants

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 5:14 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
3:14 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Faith Strengthens Aging Parents As They Care For Their Son

James Lee carries his son, Justin, to the shower. Justin's parents have a lift to help move him around the house, but their nearly 100-pound son, who has cerebral palsy, often needs to be picked up.
Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 12:37 pm

A good night's sleep is rare for Judy and James Lee. They are on parenting duty 24/7 for their son, Justin.

Justin, who has cerebral palsy and was born missing parts of his brain, also has a seizure disorder, which has gotten worse lately. He's often silent during his seizures, which means he has to sleep with his parents so they can tell when he needs help. Judy says caring for Justin is a lot like taking care of a newborn.

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Health
3:14 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Caregiving Takes Hefty Financial Toll, But Help Is Available

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 5:14 pm

NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with special needs lawyer Theresa Varnet and social entrepreneur Al Etmanski about the types of assistance available for families caring for a special needs child.

The Two-Way
3:10 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

American Teen Visiting Israel Reportedly Beaten By Police

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 1:21 pm

The U.S. has confirmed that Tariq Khdeir, an American teenager, has been arrested by Israeli authorities and the State Department has expressed concern that he has been "severely beaten."

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The Two-Way
11:44 am
Sat July 5, 2014

WATCH: Hurricane Arthur From 30 Miles Out At Sea

Screen grab of video showing Hurricane Arthur passing by Frying Pan Tower, a bed and breakfast located 30 miles off the North Carolina coast.
YouTube

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 1:08 pm

Although Hurricane Arthur appears to have spared the U.S. East Coast any major damage, 100 mph winds are nothing to take lightly, especially 30 miles out to sea along the infamous Frying Pan Shoals south of Cape Hatteras.

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