U.S. News

Business
1:10 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

As Cruise Industry Grows, So Have Its Problems

Coast Guard patrols near the cruise ship Carnival Triumph in the Gulf of Mexico on Monday. The Carnival Triumph lost propulsion power after an engine room fire a day earlier.
Jason Chambers AFP/Getty Images

It's been a rough voyage for the cruise-line industry in the past few years.

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Religion
12:55 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Korean Pastor Tackles Prejudice At Home

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. It is Presidents Day, a day we celebrate the nation's presidents, and for many people it's a day off: a day to spend time with friends and family.

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Books
12:55 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Al Roker On Being 'The Jolly Fat Person'

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 6:03 am

This segment was originally broadcast on Jan. 28, 2013.

Al Roker, the veteran weatherman on NBC's Today show, endured years of indignities as an obese teenager and throughout his television career. Then, in 2002, he had bariatric surgery and lost more than 100 pounds. But deciding to have the procedure, which is potentially life-threatening, wasn't easy — and neither was keeping the weight off afterward.

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The Two-Way
12:36 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Educators Killed At Sandy Hook School Honored At White House

President Obama with Donna and Carlos Soto, who accepted the Presidential Citizens Medal awarded to their daughter, slain Sandy Hook teacher Victoria Soto.
Shawn Thew EPA /LANDOV

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Around the Nation
10:03 am
Fri February 15, 2013

The State of Indian Country: Global Tribes?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Religion
10:03 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Keeping The Faith In The Catholic Church

Earlier this week, Pope Benedict XVI announced that he would be retiring from his position, but he's not the only prominent Catholic stepping down. Host Michel Martin speaks with top Catholic lobbyist and policy adviser, John Carr, about his own retirement and what's next for him and the Church.

Barbershop
10:02 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Who Really Benefits From Raising Minimum Wage?

President Obama argued for raising the minimum wage in his State of the Union address, but will it really help keep up with the cost of living? And the manhunt for Christopher Dorner kept the country on its toes for a week. Now that it's over, what questions remain? Host Michel Martin and the guys weigh in.

Race
9:36 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Why Do People Sympathize With Christopher Dorner?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we've heard President Obama's State of the Union speech, but what about the state of Indian Nations? We'll hear more about the message from Indian Country in just a few minutes.

But first we turn to Los Angeles, where the hunt for former LAPD officer Christopher Dorner is now over. Dorner's remains have now been positively identified after they were removed from the mountain cabin that burned down after a fiery standoff with authorities.

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Law
8:34 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Attorney Advocates For Poor As Immigration Debate Continues

Jose Pertierra is an immigration lawyer from Cuba. He is well-known for defending Elian Gonzalez and works on behalf of refugees.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

As Washington debates changing the immigration system, the demand for immigration attorneys has already jumped, even without new laws in place.

Lawyers such as Jose Pertierra, a veteran immigration attorney, are trained to interpret the law, but Pertierra sees his role as much more.

Every Thursday at 6 p.m. for the past 10 years, Pertierrra is here — on the set of the Spanish language TV studios of Univision in Washington, D.C., near Capitol Hill. He does a segment on immigration where he answers viewers' questions.

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The Two-Way
3:03 am
Fri February 15, 2013

The 27th Victim: Nancy Lanza Is Subject Of 'Frontline' Documentary

Wooden angels memorialize the victims of Adam Lanza's shooting spree in Newtown, Conn., last December. An upcoming Frontline documentary seeks to provide new details about Lanza and his mother, Nancy.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 6:13 pm

The lives of the 26 people murdered by Adam Lanza at Sandy Hook Elementary School last December were eulogized and celebrated after the tragedy. But many discussions about Lanza's first victim, his mother, Nancy, were marked by both sympathy and suspicion, particularly as the news emerged that she had taken her son to shooting ranges.

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StoryCorps
12:09 am
Fri February 15, 2013

A Husband And Wife Blessed Late In Life

The Caplans. Louis, 76, and Harriet, 67, visited StoryCorps in Santa Fe, N.M.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 6:39 am

Harriet and Louis Caplan's love story began 20 years ago in a college town in Kansas. Harriet was 48 and working at a bank. Louis was a 56-year-old physicist.

Both assumed they'd be single for the rest of their lives — until their paths crossed.

It began with Wednesday evening outings when a group would meet after work.

"We went to football games and concerts, and I still don't quite know how it happened, but instead of going in two separate cars, you and I would start going in the same car," Harriet remembers. "I don't think we ever had a date."

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Around the Nation
3:58 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Artist Works To Keep Immigrants In The Picture

Los Angeles-based artist Ramiro Gomez Jr. displays his immigrant worker art on the Capitol's East Lawn in Washington, D.C.
Lizzie Chen NPR

Ramiro Gomez Jr. is working fast enough to draw the least amount of attention, but slowly enough to make every detail stand out. He describes the rush he gets as "therapeutic."

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U.S.
3:40 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Taxpayers Steaming Over Florida Nuclear Plant's Shuttering

The Crystal River Nuclear Plant has stood idle since workers cracked the reactor's containment building in 2009. The facility is now slated to close permanently.
Will Vragovic AP

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 5:15 pm

The operator of Florida's Crystal River nuclear plant sent shockwaves through the state when it announced recently that it was shutting down the facility for good.

When nuclear plants have closed elsewhere, locals have cheered. But in Citrus County, it's been more like a death in the family.

At Fat Boy's Bar-B-Q restaurant in Crystal River, owner Bubba Keller says he's worried about what's going to happen to the community. "I mean, things are already tough," Keller says. "If this makes it worse, don't know if I can hang in there."

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Politics
2:38 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Rand Paul: 'Big Government's Not A Friend To Those Who Are Trying To Get Ahead'

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 3:40 pm

Following President Obama's State of the Union there was the customary response from the Republican Party, and for the second year there was another response from the Tea Party. Sen. Rand Paul delivered that response and joins Robert Siegel to talk about his differences with the Republican establishment.

Politics
2:38 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Senate Democrats Hope To Forestall Coming Sequester

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 3:40 pm

Robert Siegel talks to Democratic Sen. Patty Murray of Washington. She's chair of the Senate Budget Committee, and Senate Majority Conference Secretary, making her the fourth highest ranking Democrat in the Senate. They discuss her hopes to forestall the coming sequester.

Politics
2:38 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Senate Republicans Stall Hagel's Secretary Of Defense Nomination

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 3:40 pm

Senate Republicans embarked on an unprecedented filibuster of President Obama's choice for Secretary of Defense, Chuck Hagel, on Thursday.

Around the Nation
2:38 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

State Of The Union Boosts Youngstown's Story Of Economic Turnaround

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 3:40 pm

In his State of Union address this week, President Obama pointed to a successful manufacturing innovation institute in Youngstown, Ohio, as a model for other programs.

Education
2:38 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Study: Pre-K Investment Pays Off With Higher Incomes, Reduced Crime

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 3:40 pm

On Thursday, President Obama unveiled some of the details of his proposal for universal pre-K education. Robert Siegel talks with University of Chicago economist James Heckman, who's studied the benefits to society of early intervention.

Sports
2:38 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Disabled Athletes Bring Bravado To The Ice In Sled Hockey

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 3:40 pm

Bravado, body checking and broken bones are all surprisingly commonplace in sled hockey — a sport designed for people with mobility limitations.

Business
2:38 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Merger Of American Airlines and US Airways Will Create World's Largest Carrier

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 3:40 pm

The boards of US Airways Group and AMR have approved the merger of American Airlines and US Airways. The resulting company will become the world's largest airline. American is in bankruptcy, so its creditors will own a big chunk of the new company and US Airways shareholders will own the rest.

The Legacy And Future Of Mass Incarceration
2:13 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Decades On, Stiff Drug Sentence Leaves A Life 'Dismantled'

Now 59, George Prendes works as a telemarketer in New York and struggles to make the rent on his small Bronx apartment.
Natasha Haverty

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 11:11 am

There are roughly half a million people behind bars for nonviolent drug crimes in America. But no one really knows how many people have been sentenced to long prison bids since the laws known as Rockefeller drug laws first passed 40 years ago.

What's clear is that tough sentencing laws, even for low-level drug dealers and addicts, shaped a generation of young men, especially black and Hispanic men.

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Around the Nation
10:06 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Pain Is 'Deep,' 'Indescribable' For Gun Victim Pendleton's Mother

Cleopatra Pendleton (left) is consoled by her sister Kimiko Pettis on Jan. 30.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 12:24 pm

Cleopatra Cowley-Pendleton was leading a meeting at work last month when she got a phone call any mother would call horrific. Her 15-year-old daughter, Hadiya Pendleton, had been shot while with friends on Chicago's South Side.

"I went into temporary shock, I grabbed my nearest coworker ... [and said] 'Help me understand what they're saying, because clearly they're not talking about my baby,'" she tells Michel Martin, host of NPR's Tell Me More. When she got to the hospital, a nurse told her Pendleton had died.

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Around the Nation
10:06 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Pendleton's Mother: 'It's My Job' To Keep Talking

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 10:20 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Just ahead, President Obama will be speaking on gun violence in Chicago tomorrow. Some feel this visit is long overdue. We'll speak with two young people who have been working to get the president to come to Chicago. We'll ask them why and what they hope to hear from him in just a few minutes.

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The Two-Way
6:45 am
Thu February 14, 2013

'I Thought We Were Dead,' Says One Of Cop Killer's Hostages

Karen and Jim Reynolds.
AP video

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 11:05 am

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Law
1:04 am
Thu February 14, 2013

The Drug Laws That Changed How We Punish

The Jan. 4, 1973, edition of the New York Daily News reports that Gov. Rockefeller's State of the State speech called for a life sentence for drug pushers.
New York Daily News via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 1:05 am

The United States puts more people behind bars than any other country, five times as many per capita compared with Britain or Spain.

It wasn't always like this. Half a century ago, relatively few people were locked up, and those inmates generally served short sentences. But 40 years ago, New York passed strict sentencing guidelines known as the "Rockefeller drug laws" — after their champion, Gov. Nelson Rockefeller — that put even low-level criminals behind bars for decades.

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Animals
3:44 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Westminster Dog Show Winner Becomes Overnight Celebrity

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:44 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Animals
3:44 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Stranded Sea Lions Turning Up Earlier In Southern California

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:44 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Every year, sea lions get stranded along the coast of Southern California, coming onto land hungry and lost. It doesn't usually happen in February, but this year, dozens more sea lion pups than usual have turned up in beachfront neighborhoods like Malibu and Laguna Beach. Some have been found under parked cars and in people's swimming pools.

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Around the Nation
3:44 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Carnival Cruise Passengers On Fourth Day With Limited Power

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:44 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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Around the Nation
3:44 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Still A Sense Of Tension In San Bernardino Mountains After Shootout

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:44 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel. And we begin this hour in Southern California, where there are more questions than answers about yesterday's gun battle between police and a man thought to be Christopher Dorner. Dorner is the former LAPD officer who's been on the run. He's accused of setting out on a killing spree to avenge his dismissal from the force, and he's blamed for the deaths of four people in the past week.

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National Security
3:44 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Cyber Security Proposals Worry Civil Libertarians

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:44 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

President Obama has signed an executive order intended to shore up the nation's defenses against cyberattacks. The president acted yesterday. As NPR's Martin Kaste reports, similar efforts have stalled in Congress, largely because of concerns over government snooping.

MARTIN KASTE, BYLINE: You know you've arrived in the 21st century when the State of the Union includes a reference to hackers.

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