U.S. News

The Two-Way
8:02 am
Sun February 10, 2013

Chinese 'Pingpong Diplomacy' Player Dies

The Chinese table tennis player who was instrumental in the pingpong diplomacy that paved the way for President Nixon's groundbreaking visit to China has died. Zhuang Zedong was 73.

Here's more from the BBC about the 1971 incident that led to pingpong diplomacy:

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Around the Nation
3:07 am
Sun February 10, 2013

First Lady Among Mourners At Funeral For Slain Chicago Teen

The remains of Hadiya Pendleton are taken to her final resting place at the Cedar Park Cemetery on Saturday in Calumet Park, Ill.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 11:38 am

Hundreds of mourners, including first lady Michelle Obama, turned out Saturday for the funeral of 15-year-old Hadiya Pendleton, a Chicago girl who was shot to death just days after she and her high school band performed at inauguration events in Washington.

Her killing has catapulted her into the nation's debate over gun violence.

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Digital Life
3:05 am
Sun February 10, 2013

Raising Personable Children, Even If They're Glued To Phones

The Jordans use an iPad to talk to their daughter, Kelly, who's at school in Chicago.
Marie McGrory for NPR

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 2:00 pm

Weekend Edition Sunday is taking a look at how technology affects personal relationships. Along with romantic and workplace connections, family dynamics are shifting.

The Jordans are a classic example of a family trying to figure out how to use technology without feeling disconnected from one another. Sue and David have five kids: two off at college and three still at home.

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Digital Life
3:04 am
Sun February 10, 2013

'We Need To Talk': Missed Connections With Hyper-Connectivity

Sherry Turkle is a professor of the social studies of science and technology at MIT.
Courtesy of Sherry Turkle

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 1:23 pm

For Valentine's Day, maybe you'll post a photo of your loved one on Facebook, tweet out a love poem or text-message your secret crush. But as we make those virtual connections, are we missing something?

Weekend Edition Sunday is exploring a few of the places in our lives where technology can actually drive us apart and make real intimacy tough: in our romantic relationships, with our kids, even in the workplace.

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U.S.
3:41 pm
Sat February 9, 2013

Amid Daily Struggles, Gay Rights Movement Embraces Watershed Moments

Chris (right) and Renee Wiley pose for a wedding photo on Times Square in New York in December. Same-sex marriage in New York state became legal in July 2011.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 8:22 pm

From the sparks lit at the Stonewall Inn in 1969 to the whirl of same-sex marriage laws, the gay rights movement has made a lot of advances. But has it now reached a plateau?

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National Security
3:32 pm
Sat February 9, 2013

Week In News: Controversy Over Drone Strikes

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 4:51 pm

A Justice Department memo outlining the President's authority to initiate drone strikes against suspected terrorists - even U.S. born ones - has sparked a discussion about the limits of the executive branch. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with James Fallows, national correspondent with The Atlantic, about the controversy.

Animals
3:05 pm
Sat February 9, 2013

Vultures Beware: Virginia Town Targets Flock Of Unwanted Visitors

Turkey vulture droppings can strip paint, kill grass and sicken pets. The droppings also smell really bad.
Holly Kuchera iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 5:34 am

It sounds like a horror story: Every few years, usually in the winter months, residents of the town of Leesburg, Va., come home from work to find their backyards overrun with turkey vultures. Not just a few birds, but hundreds of them. Everywhere.

Lt. Jeff Dube is with the town's police department. For a whole week, he spent every evening driving around town, looking for the latest vulture hotspots.

"They like Leesburg. There's really no rhyme or reason. Every three to five years they come back en mass, like this year, 2- to 300," Dube says.

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U.S.
3:05 pm
Sat February 9, 2013

Crews Clean Up Northeast Blizzard

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 4:51 pm

As crews dig out from a record-breaking snow storm in New England, there are new worries about flooding. The National Weather Service reported waves three stories high off the coast. NPR's Jeff Brady reports from Boston.

The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Sat February 9, 2013

From Making Snow Angels To Sledding, Finding Ways To Have #FunInTheSnow

The Northeast's latest winter storm, which the Weather Channel named Nemo, is winding down, but it has left behind more than 30 inches of snow in some places. It's also left a lot of people stranded, either #CoopedUp indoors or stuck in cars overnight on the Long Island Expressway.

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News
8:27 am
Sat February 9, 2013

An Accused Killer Seeks An Audience With Everyone

Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck speaks at a press conference on the manhunt for Christopher Dorner.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 6:05 pm

From: Christopher Jordan Dorner

To: America

That's the header on a 14-page letter attributed to Christopher Dorner. The former Los Angeles police officer is the focus of a massive manhunt spanning California, Arizona, Nevada and Mexico after he allegedly shot and killed three people — including a police officer — and wounded several others during a shooting spree.

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The Two-Way
8:11 am
Sat February 9, 2013

The Blizzard 'Nemo' Highlights The Hype Cycle Of Storms

Two women look for a taxi in New York's Times Square on Friday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 11:53 am

If you've wondered why the blizzard dumping snow on the Northeast has a name, look no further than The Weather Channel. At the start of this storm season, the 24-hour-weather network announced, much to the chagrin of The National Weather Service, that it would give names to winter storms.

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Around the Nation
4:24 am
Sat February 9, 2013

NYC Labor Chorus Tries To Hit Right Note, Attract New Voices

The New York City Labor Chorus performs in 2011 at the Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi in Old Havana.
Courtesy of NYCLC

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 3:15 pm

Union membership is at its lowest point since the 1930s. New figures show a drop, and only about 11 percent of workers belong to unions today.

But these numbers don't deter the New York City Labor Chorus, which has been singing in praise of unions for more than 20 years.

Jana Ballard, the choral director of the labor chorus, is one of the youngest in the group. She's 38. The average age of the 80 members is about 65.

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Economy
3:09 am
Sat February 9, 2013

For Rural Towns, Postal Service Cuts Could Mean A Loss Of Identity

Brookfield, Vt., residents fear that Postal Service changes will eventually lead to the closing of their small town post office. About 1,300 people live in Brookfield, according to 2010 U.S. Census figures.
Steve Zind Vermont Public Radio

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 10:11 am

In rural Vermont, the U.S. Postal Service decision to discontinue Saturday letter delivery is yet another blow to an institution that's long been a fixture of village life.

Last year, the U.S. Postal Service abandoned plans to close thousands of small post offices, opting instead to cut hours. But there are fears the cuts will continue until the rural post office is no more.

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Reporter's Notebook
3:08 am
Sat February 9, 2013

For Some In Minneapolis, National Gun Debate Hits Close To Home

President Obama greets law enforcement officers after speaking on ideas to reduce gun violence at the Minneapolis Police Department Special Operations on Monday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 10:11 am

The shooting massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., in December revived a national debate about gun violence. It's one that is emotional and often highly personal, and it's happening in places far from the halls of Congress. Earlier this week, President Obama was in Minneapolis advocating new limits on guns; no law or set of laws, he said, can keep children completely safe. NPR's David Welna was there for the visit and sent this reporter's notebook about the voices he encountered.

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Law
3:06 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Former LAPD Officer Accused Of Killing Three People Spent Time In The Navy

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 5:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Police in Southern California are still searching for Christopher Dorner. He's the fired LA police officer who's wanted for three murders and other shootings since the weekend. At last word, the search had led police into the San Bernardino Mountains where Dorner's Nissan pickup truck was found torched. Police are going door to door in search of Dorner, who is a 33-year-old, 6-foot tall, 270 pound African-American.

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Around the Nation
3:06 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Historic Blizzard Freezes Transit In Northeast U.S.

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 5:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Heavy snow is falling across the Northeast, and when it's all over, winter storm Nemo could be a blizzard of historic proportions. The governor of Massachusetts has even ordered all cars off the roads.

CORNISH: The impact on transportation is widespread: thousands of flights cancelled, trains service disrupted. NPR's Jim Zarroli tells us more.

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Around the Nation
3:06 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Some In Northeast Turn Down Chance To Sell Sandy-Damaged Homes

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 5:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As Jim mentioned, memories of Hurricane Sandy are still fresh for people living in coastal New York, and now the governor wants to help some of them walk away from the coastline altogether. Governor Andrew Cuomo is proposing to buy and demolish homes that were badly damaged by the storm. NPR's Joel Rose sent this story.

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Around the Nation
3:06 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

New York City Mayor Takes Anti-Gun Campaign To Illinois

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 5:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is taking his anti-gun campaign to Illinois and its 2nd congressional district. There, no less than 22 candidates hope to replace former Congressman Jesse Jackson, Jr. Gun violence plagued some of the Chicago neighborhoods that are part of the district. And as NPR's Cheryl Corley reports, guns have become a key issue in the race.

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U.S.
3:06 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Northeast Storm Likely To End Up In The Record Books

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 5:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. The Northeast is now enveloped in a blizzard that is likely bound for the record books. That means snow falling at two to three inches an hour and wind gusts as high as 70 miles an hour. One more number for you: Some places could see as much as three feet of snow. NPR's Tovia Smith reports even the most seasoned New Englanders are hunkering down.

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Around the Nation
3:06 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Growing University Highlights Connecticut's Water Woes

The expanding University of Connecticut is looking at the Farmington River as a water source, but some say recent weather fluctuation paints an uncertain picture for the river.
Neena Satija WNPR

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 9:03 pm

Lack of water supply isn't just an issue in hot spots like Texas, Colorado and the Mississippi; it has also become a problem in the Northeast, where rivers are drying out in the summers and infrastructure developments are competing more for resources.

One of the area's biggest public universities, the University of Connecticut, needs more water. But plans to obtain it are generating controversy in a region where the availability of water is becoming more and more unpredictable.

The Water Source

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It's All Politics
2:44 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

6 Reasons Ashley Judd Is The Target Of An Attack Ad

Ashley Judd, who has said she's considering a challenge to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell in Kentucky, is now the subject of a Karl Rove-backed attack ad.
Matt Sayles AP

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 2:48 pm

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The Salt
1:38 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

When The Microbes Are Happy, The Brewer Is Happy

Yeast affects several aspects of beer including the foam, or head, that forms on the of the glass. If fermentation is too vigorous, too many of the foam-stabilizing proteins may be lost.
Cate Gillon Getty Images

Yeast can be pretty demanding little buggers, despite being unicellular microscopic organisms. Brewers know they must appease them to get the beer they want.

"It's yeast-strain dependent, it's environment, it's temperature, oxygen levels," says Matt Brophy, brewmaster of Flying Dog Brewery in Frederick, Md. "There's a lot of variables that you need to have a high level of control over."

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The Two-Way
1:14 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Would A Storm By Any Other Name Be So Scary?

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 2:32 pm

Can you really be afraid of a storm with the same name as a cartoon fish with a bum fin?

Variations of that joke are all over social media, even as the storm called Nemo is dumping rain and snow throughout the Northeastern U.S. Albert Brooks, the voice of one clownfish in the movie Finding Nemo, quipped on Twitter: "They have named this new Nor'easter Nemo. I am not looking for it."

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Law
12:39 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Obama Team To Make Important, If Symbolic, Choice On Gay Marriage

People wait in line to enter the Supreme Court as the term began in October.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 5:09 pm

The Obama administration faces tricky political and legal questions on the subject of gay marriage. By the end of this month, the federal government is expected to file not just one but two briefs in a pair of same-sex marriage cases at the U.S. Supreme Court.

But it is the Proposition 8 case from California that poses the thornier questions for the administration — questions so difficult that the president himself is expected to make the final decision on what arguments the Justice Department will make in the Supreme Court.

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Shots - Health News
12:06 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Feds Reject Mississippi's Plan For Insurance Exchange

The heath exchange Mississippi Insurance Commissioner Mike Chaney had in mind got turned down by the federal government.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 2:51 pm

Mississippi Insurance Commissioner Mike Chaney, who has been the driving force behind the creation of a state-based exchange, got his answer from the feds: Sure can't.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services rejected the plan Thursday, making Mississippi the only state to have its exchange blueprint nixed by the federal government.

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Shots - Health News
8:25 am
Fri February 8, 2013

Stressed Out Americans Want Help, But Many Don't Get It

Life as a millennial may not be as mellow as it looks.
iStockphoto.com

Nobody doubts that stress can contribute to health problems, from depression to anxiety to heart attacks.

But you could be forgiven for thinking that folks who take care of other people for a living don't seem to have fully absorbed the message.

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Around the Nation
8:18 am
Fri February 8, 2013

In St. Louis, Trivia Is No Trivial Pursuit

Not everyone dresses up for trivia night, but since her table at St. Rita was named for the Minnesota Vikings, Laura Mueller couldn't resist.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 12:10 pm

There was barely room to walk from one end of the social hall to the other last Saturday night at St. Rita Catholic Church in Vinita Park, Mo.

The occasion wasn't a wedding, a christening or even a bingo game. It was trivia.

You can participate in trivia contests on slow nights in bars in practically any city across the country. But in the St. Louis area, trivia has evolved into a major source of revenue for nonprofit organizations.

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The Two-Way
5:22 am
Fri February 8, 2013

Massive Manhunt Continues In Southern California

In Big Bear Lake, Calif., officers searched Thursday for suspect Christopher Jordan Dorner.
Bret Hartman EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 4:32 pm

(We'll be updating this post throughout the day; most recently at 12:30 p.m. ET.)

Police in Southern California were still searching Friday for former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Jordan Dorner, who they say is the lone suspect in a series of shootings over the past week that have left three people — including a cop — dead. It's feared he is intent on killing more police officers in revenge for his firing from the L.A. police force four years ago.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
1:29 am
Fri February 8, 2013

Federal Aid For Religious Institutions In Murky Waters After Sandy

Torahs are draped on chairs and tables at Temple Israel of Long Beach, N.Y. The synagogue was flooded during Superstorm Sandy, but hasn't received federal aid.
Temple Israel

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 6:57 pm

More than 200 houses of worship damaged in Superstorm Sandy have applied for aid from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. But given the separation of church and state, it's unclear whether federal funds are available to them.

The sanctuary of Temple Israel of Long Beach, N.Y., was flooded with more than 10 feet of saltwater in some places, says Rabbi David Bauman.

"Roughly 5 to 7 feet [of water] in most, and there were surges — particularly in our mechanical room — that went upwards of 12 to 14 feet," he says.

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Reporter's Notebook
1:23 am
Fri February 8, 2013

Puerto Rican Hip-Hop Icon Tego Calderon Mixes Prose And Politics

Puerto Rican hip-hop artist Tego Calderon outside his studio, El Sitio, in Santurce, San Juan, Puerto Rico.
Coburn Dukehart NPR

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 12:02 pm

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