U.S. News

Sports
3:33 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Hockey's Hottest Teams Hit The Ice In Stanley Cup Final

An oversized Chicago Blackhawks hockey helmet sits on one of the lion sculptures outside the entrance to the Art Institute of Chicago in celebration of the team's upcoming appearance in the Stanley Cup Final in Chicago. The Blackhawks host the Boston Bruins in Game 1 on Wednesday.
Scott Eisen AP

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 5:03 pm

The National Hockey League's Stanley Cup championship gets underway in Chicago Wednesday night, with the Chicago Blackhawks and the Boston Bruins facing off in the first game of the best-of-seven series. It's a classic matchup between two of the NHL's original six teams.

Both teams are recent champs, which is helping passionate hockey fans and players put the bitter labor dispute that almost iced the season behind them.

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The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Huge System Of Storms Predicted To March East From Midwest

A map shows the chance of severe thunderstorms Wednesday evening, with the National Weather Service predicting strong winds and storms moving eastward to the mid-Atlantic Thursday.
NOAA

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 7:03 pm

The National Weather Service warns of a massive storm system that will make its way eastward from Iowa to Maryland in the next 24 hours, as strong winds, thunderstorms, and hail are predicted to hit areas from the upper Midwest to the Mid-Atlantic beginning Wednesday and continuing Thursday.

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Around the Nation
2:48 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

City Life Snapshot: Dayton's 5th Street Brew Pub Co-Op

Brian Young and Maureen Barry
Courtesy of Eric Risher, ReInvention Stories/WYSO

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 5:55 pm

In this City Life Snapshot from Dayton, Ohio, we meet Brian Young and Maureen Barry in a story of urban re-invention. Young and Barry gathered up 32 neighborhood investors to turn a 19th century grocery store that had fallen into disrepair into a local gathering spot: the Fifth Street Brew Pub Co-op. This story comes to us from Eric Risher and Lesley Fogle of ReInvention Stories, a project at member station WYSO.

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National Security
2:20 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

After Obama's Speech, Guantanamo Shows Few Signs Of Closing

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 4:20 pm

President Obama has promised again to close the military prison at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. But since he delivered a major speech two weeks ago, there's been little follow-up and few signs that any detainees are closer to being released.

Around the Nation
2:20 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Prisoner And Politician, Bulger Brothers Led Different Lives

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 4:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

One notable absence in the courtroom today, that of William Bulger, Whitey Bulger's brother. William was one of the most powerful politicians in the state for decades. And we're going to take a minute now to learn about the Bulger brothers' relationship. David Boeri has been tracking this saga for a long time. He's a senior reporter for our member station WBUR in Boston. Hey there, David.

DAVID BOERI, BYLINE: Hi, Audie.

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Around the Nation
2:20 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

50 Years After His Death, Medgar Evers' Work Not Complete

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 4:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

NPR is looking back on the summer of 1963, a boiling point in the nation's violent civil rights struggle. It was 50 years ago today, that civil rights leader Medgar Evers was killed by a white supremacist in Jackson, Mississippi. Today, he's being remembered in Mississippi's capital city.

And as NPR's Debbie Elliott reports, the anniversary highlights both progress made and work that remains.

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Around the Nation
2:20 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Poll: Majority Of Americans Comfortable With Surveillance

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 4:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It is no surprise that privacy advocates are deeply disturbed by the NSA's data collection. The ACLU has already sued the Obama administration. But the general public appears to feel less alarmed. One poll indicates a majority of Americans are comfortable with the NSA's surveillance. Still, many wonder what they can do to control their information. As NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, that is not easy.

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Law
2:20 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Trial Of Mobster 'Whitey' Bulger Begins In Boston

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 4:20 pm

Opening statements were held Wednesday in the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger, the notorious Boston mobster who is charged with 32 counts of racketeering and murder.

The Two-Way
1:44 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Can The Patriots Groom Tebow To Be A Good NFL Quarterback?

New England Patriots quarterback Tim Tebow throws during practice in Foxborough, Mass., on Tuesday.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 4:07 am

Tim Tebow, the polarizing quarterback everyone has come to know and love (or hate), found a new home this week in New England, when the Patriots signed him to a two-year, nonguaranteed contract, igniting yet another cycle of Tebowmania.

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The Two-Way
1:23 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Federal Defender Wants Out Of Terrorism Case Due To Budget Cuts

Samuel Richard Rubin, head of the federal defender's office in Idaho, says his office "has an obligation to handle 75 percent of the [federal] indigent cases" in the state.
John Miller AP

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 4:32 pm

A federal public defender in Idaho wants a judge to find another lawyer for an Uzbek national charged with aiding a terrorist group and training others in how to build and use a weapon of mass destruction.

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Around the Nation
9:42 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Want To Know Something? Just Ask

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 10:00 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Beauty Shop
9:42 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Catcalling: Ignore It Or Enjoy It?

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 10:00 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. You might have checked out some of the duds the NBA superstars are sporting off the court. One of the people who helps them stay that fresh is designer Ozwald Boateng. We'll hear how the son of Ghanaian immigrants found his place on London's prestigious Savile Row. That conversation is just ahead. But first, I want to take a trip to the beauty shop, that's where our panel of women writers, journalists, thinkers, and activists talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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History
9:42 am
Wed June 12, 2013

50 Years Of Remembering Medgar Evers, His Widow Reflects

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin. And this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We start the program today with a memory. Fifty years ago today, a few minutes after midnight, civil rights activist Medgar Evers was gunned down in his driveway in Jackson, Mississippi by a white segregationist who wanted to stop Evers' work as a field organizer for the NAACP. He was just 37 years old, a war veteran, a husband, and father of three. Evers had put his life on the line to register voters. Here he is a month before his murder.

(SOUNDBITE OF MEDGAR EVERS)

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Sweetness And Light
8:03 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Basketball: The 'Ultimate Contradiction'

In basketball, as in life, we may dutifully celebrate the aggregate, but we'Β™re always spellbound by the exceptional.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:53 am

Basketball offers its fans the ultimate contradiction. On the one hand, it's the sport that most depends on its stars. On the other, it's the most intimate β€” even organic β€” of all the team games, with its players more fundamentally involved with one another. Both of these opposing realities are rooted in the same base.

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Law
5:15 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Privacy In Retreat, A Timeline

President Bush signs the Patriot Act Bill during a ceremony in the White House East Room on Oct. 26, 2001.
Doug Mills AP

Viewed out of context, recent Washington revelations paint a disturbing portrait of the vast amount of electronic data the nation's spy agencies are collecting. But the blockbuster news stories belie a simple truth: Personal privacy rights have been under sustained assault since well before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. And it's not just government that's vacuuming up information.

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The Two-Way
4:56 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Winfrey Gives Millions To New African-American Museum In D.C.

Oprah Winfrey gave $12 million Tuesday to help build the Smithsonian's new National Museum of African American History and Culture, seen here in a scale model (lower center). The facility is expected to open in 2015.
Allison Keyes NPR

Media mogul Oprah Winfrey is giving a multimillion-dollar boost to the Smithsonian's new facility, the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). She gave the museum, which is being built in Washington, D.C., $12 million Tuesday, in addition to a previous $1 million donation.

"I am so proud of African-American history and its contributions to our nation as a whole," says Winfrey, chairman and CEO of the Oprah Winfrey Network. "I am deeply appreciative of those who paved the path for me and all who follow in their footsteps."

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Law
4:20 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

ACLU Sues Feds Over Surveillance Program

The American Civil Liberties Union is suing the federal government over the National Security Agency's phone and Internet surveillance program.

National Security
4:20 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

What's Next For NSA Leaker Edward Snowden?

Melissa Block talks to Washington attorney David Laufman, who prosecuted national security cases during the George W. Bush administration. He talks about the complications of prosecuting a case that involves extradition requests and classified materials.

Law
4:20 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Immigration Reform Bill Crosses First Hurdle In Senate

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The most ambitious and potentially historic bill that Congress may see this term is now being debated in the full Senate. It's the bill to revamp immigration laws and it's a high priority of President Obama's. He's repeatedly pushed back at Republicans who insist on more border security. And today, the president took the time to speak about it again, in advance of the Senate debate.

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Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems
3:30 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Can Federal Funds Help Social Service Groups Work Smarter?

Jasmine Chestnut at her internship at the Center for American Progress in Washington. An at-risk student, Chestnut had almost given up on college when a nonprofit network supported by the government's Social Innovation Fund helped her get back on track.
Gabriella Demczuk NPR

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:20 pm

When President Obama first took office in 2009, he had an idea called the Social Innovation Fund.

"We're going to use this fund to find the most promising nonprofits in America," he said when announcing the plan. "We'll examine their data and rigorously evaluate their outcomes. We'll invest in those with the best results that are the most likely to provide a good return on our taxpayer dollars."

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It's All Politics
3:26 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

What Did Congress Really Know About NSA Tracking?

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is among the lawmakers who say they were never briefed about the government's surveillance programs.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:20 pm

If you're a member of Congress and you didn't know about the National Security Agency's phone records program before it was disclosed last week, President Obama has this to say to you: Where have you been?

"When it comes to telephone calls, every member of Congress has been briefed on this program," Obama said to reporters last Friday.

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Around the Nation
3:16 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Weeks Later, IRS Investigation Hasn't Slowed Down

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

An update now on the congressional investigation into the IRS' flagging of conservative groups for extra scrutiny. For the first time since the scandal broke, there are no public hearings scheduled this week. The action is all behind closed doors as NPR's Tamara Keith tells us from Capitol Hill.

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Around the Nation
3:16 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

'Moral Mondays' Protest Agenda Of N.C. Legislature

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:20 pm

In North Carolina, NAACP leaders are planning a seventh week of protests at the state legislature. The demonstrations have grown in size and number of arrests every week since they started back in April. Protest organizers oppose the social, economic and voting policies of the Republican-led General Assembly, and they want lawmakers to take notice. But it's not clear whether legislators will change their policies as a result of the protests.

History
3:16 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Spit And Cotton Swabs The Tools For A Mummy Facelift

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:20 pm

Audie Cornish speaks with Mimi Leveque, head conservator on a project that restored a 2,500-year-old mummy. The mummy got face work and cleaning done courtesy of Massachusetts General Hospital.

Around the Nation
3:16 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Massive Bat Cave Stirs Texas-Size Debate Over Development

Millions of bats live in Bracken Cave, in a rural area near San Antonio. Conservationists are worried that plans for a multithousand-unit housing development will disrupt the bat colony.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:28 pm

The Bracken Bat Cave, just north of San Antonio, is as rural as it gets. You have to drive down a long, 2-mile rocky road to reach it. There's nothing nearby β€” no lights, no running water. The only thing you hear are the katydids.

The cave houses a massive bat colony, as it has for an estimated 10,000 years. Bat Conservation International, the group that oversees the Bracken Cave Reserve, wants it to stay secluded, but the area's rural nature could change if a local developer's plan moves forward.

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U.S.
3:16 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Border Drones Fly Into Fight Over Immigration

A Predator drone operated by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Office of Air and Marine taxis for a flight over southern Arizona near the Mexican border on March 7 from Fort Huachuca in Sierra Vista, Ariz.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:21 pm

The runways at Fort Huachuca, Ariz., are busy. This is where the Army tests its military drones, where it trains its drone pilots, and where four Customs and Border Protection drones take off and land.

From here, the CBP drones survey the Arizona-Mexico border β€” mainly looking for immigrants and drug smugglers.

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Shots - Health News
3:16 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Administration's Plan For Morning-After Pill Pleases No One

Plan B One-Step might be the only emergency contraceptive available to all ages without a prescription.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:20 pm

Reaction was swift to the Obama administration's announcement Monday night that it was dropping a long-running legal battle to keep age restrictions on one type of the morning-after birth control pill.

But like just about everything else in this decade-long controversy, the latest decision has pleased just about no one.

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The Salt
3:12 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Tender Beef, Without The Pathogens: USDA Proposes Labeling Rules

Meat tenderized the old-fashioned way. The industrial method is a mechanized process involving needles.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:27 pm

In order to make tough cuts of beef more tender, the industry uses a mechanical tenderizing process that involves piercing the meat with needles.

This is effective in breaking up the tough muscle fibers, but there's a downside, too: a higher risk of surface bacteria making their way into the cut of meat, which can set the stage for food poisoning. That's a particular concern when it comes to the center of meat cuts, which don't get heated to the same temperatures as the exterior.

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The Two-Way
1:24 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Google Asks Permission To Publish Info About FISA Requests

Google was recently allowed to release general data about national security letters it receives, as seen in this chart. The company is now asking the U.S. government to allow it to publish similar data on national security requests, including those made under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.
Google

As Google and other large tech companies cope with the aftermath of recent reports that the National Security Agency has had broad access to their users' data, the search giant is asking the U.S. government for permission to publish the number of national security requests it receives, including those made under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

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Parenting
10:00 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Father Knows Best: Advice For Modern Dads

Looking ahead to Father's Day this weekend, Tell Me More's parenting panel dishes some advice. Host Michel Martin is joined by some pros β€” Dan Bucatinsky, Lester Spence and Manny Ruiz β€” who answer listener questions about how best to parent in today's busy world.

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