U.S. News

Around the Nation
12:31 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Watch Out For Bridezilla: Avoiding A Wedding Etiquette Blunder

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 12:55 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Switching gears now. It's wedding season. You might be invited to a wedding or two or three. Yesterday we talked about how engaged couples should start talking about money before the wedding, so if you'd like to catch up on that conversation, go to npr.org.

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Sports
12:31 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

What Does Body Ink Say About NBA Players' Pain And Personalities?

Wilson Chandler of the Denver Nuggets has cartoons all over his legs.
Jack Dempsey AP

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 12:55 pm

Ethan Swan, who runs an art gallery in downtown Los Angeles, believes that "so much of art is about the creation of meaning through image." He also believes that "tattoos are a great way to mark pain."

So Swan is naturally interested in how body ink plays out for others. It's become what he admits is a quest.

As the founder of the blog NBA Tattoos, Swan tells NPR's Michel Martin that in 2010, he got a new cable package and started watching a lot of basketball.

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Shots - Health News
11:17 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Kids In Juvenile Detention Face Risk Of Violent Death As Adults

Girls who were arrested and detained were at particular risk for premature death in adulthood.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 7:24 am

Delinquent children are much more likely than their nondelinquent peers to die violently later in life, a study finds. And girls who ended up in juvenile detention were especially vulnerable, dying at nearly five times the rate of the general population.

"This was astonishing," says Linda Teplin, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University's medical school and the lead author of the study.

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Parallels
10:00 am
Wed June 18, 2014

What's Next For Iraq?

A woman and a girl wash at a camp in Kalak set up for those fleeing the fighting in northern Iraq. The escalating conflict has sent shock waves across the region and is further destabilizing the Middle East.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 7:40 pm

This post was updated at 9:40 p.m. ET to reflect the Obama administration's pressure on the Iraqi government.

A week ago, it would have been difficult to find anyone in the U.S. arguing for renewed U.S. military action in Iraq. Now there's a furious debate about what the U.S. should, or shouldn't, do in the latest Iraqi crisis.

The drama seemed to erupt out of nowhere as Islamist extremists captured Mosul, one of the country's largest and most important cities, and kept pushing south toward the capital Baghdad.

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Shots - Health News
5:54 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Some Paramedics Doing Less Transport, More Treatment At Scene

Speeding to a house call? Training paramedics to do more treatment at the scene can be pricey, critics say.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 5:42 am

It's being called the house call of the future: Ambulance crews rush when you call 911, but instead of taking you to the emergency room, they treat you at home.

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Iraq
4:43 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

What, Exactly, Are U.S. Interests In Iraq's Turmoil?

Iraqi Shiite tribesmen show their enthusiasm Tuesday for joining Iraqi security forces in the fight against Islamist militants who have taken over several northern Iraqi cities.
Haidar Hamdani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 6:33 pm

As the U.S. steers warships closer to Iraq and beefs up its embassy's security in Baghdad with nearly 300 troops, a nagging question has resurfaced.

What compelling interests does Washington still have in a nation where all U.S. forces were pulled out 2 1/2 years ago?

Three days after Sunni militants calling themselves the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria seized Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city, President Obama paused on the White House lawn and issued a warning.

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All Tech Considered
4:41 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

How Yahoo's Diversity Numbers Compare With Google's

Yahoo is famously led by a woman, CEO Marissa Mayer. But its workforce, like most tech companies, is dominated by men.
Robert Galbraith Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 6:05 pm

Yahoo has responded to the years-long calls for tech companies to disclose their staffs' gender and racial breakdowns. The numbers released Tuesday show its workforce, like much of the tech industry, is dominated by white and Asian males. In its post releasing the data, Yahoo explained its reasoning:

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The Two-Way
3:40 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Ga., Mo. Inmates Put To Death; First Since Botched Oklahoma Execution

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 11:48 pm

This post was updated at 1:30 a.m. ET Wednesday:

A Missouri inmate has been put to death for killing two St. Louis County women in 1996, marking the state's fifth execution this year, according to The Associated Press.

A corrections spokesman told the AP that John Winfield died early Wednesday at the state prison in Bonne Terre.

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It's All Politics
3:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Suspect's Capture Doesn't Arrest Benghazi Suspicions

During a visit to Pittsburgh Tuesday, President Obama comments on the capture of a Libyan militant suspected of the 2012 killings of four Americans in Benghazi.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 3:33 pm

Does the capture of Ahmed Abu Khatallah, a key suspect in the deadly 2012 Benghazi attacks, alter the political polarity of the episode?

If so, the change wasn't immediately apparent.

While Republicans said Tuesday they welcomed the news, they also made clear that their suspicions toward President Obama on all things Benghazi were far from assuaged.

Indeed, what appeared to happen was that Khatallah's apprehension added to — rather than subtracted from — the GOP points of contention with the Obama administration.

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The Salt
2:46 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

'Pink Slime' Is Making A Comeback. Do You Have A Beef With That?

South Dakota-based meat processor Beef Products Inc. shows a sample of its lean, finely textured beef in September 2012.
AP

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 2:36 pm

A much-maligned beef product that was once frequently added to hamburger is making a comeback. Two years ago, beef processors cut back sharply on producing what they call "lean, finely textured beef" after the nasty nickname for it, "pink slime," caught on in the media. Now, higher beef prices are leading to increased demand for the product.

To prepare, grocery stores and beef processors are getting ready for a new round of questions from consumers.

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NPR Ed
2:42 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Study Delivers Failing Grades For Many Programs Training Teachers

Colleges of education spend more than $6 billion every year preparing classroom teachers, but few students graduate ready to teach, according to a new study.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 6:33 pm

The nation's teacher-preparation programs have plenty of room for improvement, according to a new report.

A study released today by the National Council on Teacher Quality argues that teaching colleges are too lenient in their admissions criteria and have failed to prepare their students to teach subjects like reading, math and science.

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Politics
2:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Lightning-Fast Trades Go Beneath The Congressional Microscope

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 6:33 pm

The Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations is holding a hearing on problems in the financial markets caused by high-frequency trading firms.

Iraq
2:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Will The Trouble In Iraq Draw U.S. And Iran Closer Together?

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 6:33 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

One big question about Iraq concerns it's neighbor to the east, Iran. What will Tehran do in the face of the ISIS offensive? And do Iran and the United States share sufficient common interests to actually cooperate over Iraq? Well, joining us from Tehran is Thomas Erdbrink, who is the New York Times bureau chief there. And tell us, how worried are the Iranians, first, about what ISIS has done in Iraq?

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Business
2:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

A View Of The Ride-Share Debate From The Backseat Of Both Sides

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 6:33 pm

Local governments across the U.S. are struggling to decide how to handle new ride-sharing services, which are often at once popular and unrelated — or even illegal. Odette Yousef of WBEZ reports on the debate in Illinois, trying to determine the answer to one important question: What makes ride-share services different from taxis?

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Education
2:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Philly Schools Teeter On Brink Of Layoffs, Struggling For Funding

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 6:33 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Once again, one of the most troubled school districts in the country is sounding alarm bells over funding. The head of the Philadelphia school district says he needs almost $100 million, and even that, he says, would just maintain a status quo he calls inadequate. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

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Health
10:34 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Educate And Ask: Key To Living With Sickle Cell Disease

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Tue June 17, 2014

A Native American Take On Tornadoes

1904-05. Red Stone Church Built Winter
Courtesy of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Musuem of Natural History, University of Oklahoma

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 5:50 am

While tornadoes continue to tear across America's midsection — taking lives and destroying property — we continue to search for explanations of the phenomenon, in hopes of developing better warning systems and protection.

But after decades of research, funded by decamillions of dollars, the fundamentals of wind funnels remain somewhat mysterious.

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Around the Nation
2:42 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Tensions Still High In 'Nevada Land' Over Cattle Dispute

Rancher Cliven Bundy stands near a gate on his 160-acre ranch in Bunkerville, Nev., the site of a standoff with the government last month. If the federal government comes back, Bundy promises, his militia supporters will also return in force.
Mike Blake Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 6:51 am

Cliven Bundy's ranch is just a few miles off Interstate 15 in southern Nevada, near the tiny town of Bunkerville. The dirt road that gets you there snakes through a hot and forlorn patch of desert. You know you've found it when you see a spray-painted sign for Bundy Melons.

"What we say is, we raise cows and melons and kids. That's what we do here," says Bundy, smiling as he hoses down a dusty sidewalk that leads into the family's ranch house.

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The Two-Way
6:43 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Tornadoes Cause Widespread Damage, Injuries In Nebraska

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 8:59 am

A pair of large tornadoes ripped through rural northeastern Nebraska, devastating one small town, causing damage to two others and killing at least one person, reports say.

Reuters says: "The tornadoes, part of a supercell thunderstorm system, cut a swath across northeastern Nebraska, uprooting trees and leveling homes, officials said. The still-dangerous storm system was headed into northwestern Iowa."

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Law
4:04 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Supreme Court Rules Against Gun 'Straw Purchases'

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 1:59 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court delivered a major victory to gun control advocates on Monday. The 5-4 ruling allows strict enforcement of the federal ban on gun "straw purchases," or one person buying a gun for another.

The federal law on background checks requires federally licensed gun dealers to verify the identity of buyers and submit their names to a federal database to weed out felons, those with a history of mental illness and others barred from gun ownership.

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Shots - Health News
3:24 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Entrepreneurs Buzzing Over Medical Marijuana In Florida

One of three marijuana plants growing in the backyard of a 65-year-old retiree from Pompano Beach, Fla. He grows and smokes his own "happy grass" to alleviate pain.
Carline Jean MCT/Landov

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 7:05 am

Twenty-two states and the District of Columbia now have laws allowing for some form of medical marijuana.

Florida appears poised to join the club. Polls show that voters there are likely to approve a November ballot measure legalizing marijuana for medical use.

If it passes, regulations that would set up a market for medical marijuana in Florida are still at least a year away. But cannabis entrepreneurs from around the country are already setting up shop in the state.

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The Salt
3:24 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

In The Making Of Megafarms, A Mixture Of Pride And Pain

When families give up farming and move away, it drains life out of small communities.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 9:37 am

It seems that everybody, going back at least to Thomas Jefferson, loves small family farms.

Yet those beloved small farms are becoming increasingly irrelevant. Big farms are taking over.

According to the latest census of American agriculture, released this year, there are two million farms in America. But just four percent of those farms account for two-thirds of all agricultural production.

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It's All Politics
3:10 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Poll: Congressional Approval At Dangerous Low Point

The U.S. Capitol is seen in early morning light in December 2013.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Congressional incumbents are facing one of the toughest midterm election climates in recent memory, according to a Gallup poll released Monday.

The poll, conducted June 5-8, finds Congress's job approval at 16 percent, its lowest point in a midterm election year since Gallup began tracking the metric in 1974. Satisfaction with the direction of the country comes in at a paltry 23 percent, just a point above its 2010 midterm year low.

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NPR Ed
3:09 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Can Schools Solve The Tech Industry's Pipeline Problem?

When Google went public with data about the diversity of its workforce, it fueled the ongoing conversation about diversity in the technology industry.
Virginia Mayo AP

It's been only a couple of weeks since Google released the diversity numbers on its workforce, and there's been a lot of talk since then about why the tech giant and others in the industry don't really reflect the American population as a whole.

A well-written piece today in Mother Jones offers some provocative thoughts on what can be done about it — and schools could play a big role.

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Business
2:29 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Growing Worker Shortage Looms Over Logging Industry's Future

Michael Redfern's family has been logging Tennessee forests for four generations. But it's hard, dangerous work in a volatile industry, so fewer young people are pursuing the trade.
Bobby Allyn Nashville Public Radio

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 11:10 am

Timber is big business in Tennessee. About $1 billion worth of the state's tree products is shipped abroad every year. But within the industry, there is concern that there may soon be too few loggers to keep the profession going.

The Redfern family has been working the state's forests for four generations, but it isn't sure it will see a fifth.

Michael Redfern, 57, runs a three-man operation with his two sons on a 25-acre property in Cedar Hill, near Tennessee's northern border with Kentucky.

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Around the Nation
2:07 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Chicago Gets Out From Under Its History Of Political Patronage

A court-appointed federal monitor will no longer oversee hiring in the city of Chicago. A federal judge ruled that the city has put in place enough safeguards to minimize patronage in Chicago government jobs. It took 45 years of court orders and consent decrees, but political reformers say that patronage, which once built a powerful democratic machine, is slowly becoming a thing of the past.

The Salt
2:04 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The B50 Burger

The B50 Burger — as in, you won't live to be 50.
NPR

Ever since Eli Whitney invented the Beef Gin in 1793, hamburgers have basically been the same: an all-beef patty, eaten as quickly as possible. But now, new technologies are allowing burgerologists to expand the medium. Chef's Burger Bistro in Chicago has created the B50 Burger, with a patty that's 50 percent ground beef, 50 percent ground bacon. And then there's a fried egg thrown on top, just for fun.

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It's All Politics
1:22 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Texas Politics To Be Lone Star Of New HBO Series

A large Texas flag is carried up Congress Avenue toward the Texas Capitol during the annual Boy Scouts Parade and Report to State in Austin in February 2013.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 1:54 pm

Between Rick Perry, Ted Cruz and Wendy Davis, Texas politicians in recent years have lived up to their state's reputation for producing larger-than-life characters.

That makes the Texas political scene a natural for the Hollywood treatment.

HBO has given God Save Texas, a drama about the state's often raucous political culture, the green light for development. It's set to unfold at the Texas statehouse, a perennial flashpoint for national debates about issues ranging from abortion to gun rights to the size and role of government.

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Code Switch
7:18 am
Mon June 16, 2014

On The Census, Who Checks 'Hispanic,' Who Checks 'White,' And Why

The word "Hispanic" means very different things in different parts of the country, Julie Dowling says.
blackwaterimages Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:51 am

We've been talking a lot lately about how who fills out the Census in what way. It's an ongoing preoccupation of Code Switch, and one shared by Julie Dowling. Dowling, a University of Illinois sociologist, whose book, Mexican Americans and the Question of Race, came out earlier this year.

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U.S.
3:52 pm
Sun June 15, 2014

Home, Food Or Health Care: A Choice Many Renters Can't Afford

As the number of renters in Los Angeles increases, construction of new apartments isn't keeping pace with demand, resulting in rents higher than many can afford.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 12:56 pm

The mortgage crisis that devastated the economy has received endless attention, but it's not just homeowners who have suffered badly in this economy.

As of 2012, renters made up 35 percent of American households. Their numbers are growing, reversing a decades-long uptick in homeownership.

And in the past 50 years, the percentage of income they're spending on the rent has increased dramatically. A quarter of renters are spending more than half their income on rent.

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