U.S. News

Shots - Health News
1:31 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Measles Outbreak In Ohio Leads Amish To Reconsider Vaccines

Amish show up at a makeshift clinic to get vaccinated against the measles. There's been an outbreak of measles among the Amish in central Ohio.
Sarah Jane Tribble Sarah Jane Tribble

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:53 am

The Amish countryside in central Ohio looks as it has for a hundred years. There are picturesque pastures with cows and sheep, and big red barns dot the landscape.

But something changed here, when, on an April afternoon, an Amish woman walked to a communal call box. She picked up the phone to call the Knox County Health Department. She told a county worker she and a family next door had the measles.

That call spurred nurse Jacqueline Fletcher into action.

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Environment
1:27 am
Tue June 24, 2014

As Sea Levels Rise, Norfolk Is Sinking And Planning

The naval base at Norfolk has had to build two levels to its docks to accommodate rising sea levels. The water level has risen about 1 1/2 feet since 1920.
Yuki Noguchi NPR

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 9:25 am

From the water's edge in Norfolk, Va., the U.S. naval base spans the whole horizon. Aircraft carriers, supply centers, barracks and admirals' homes fill a vast expanse.

But Ray Toll, a retired naval oceanographer, says the "majority of [the naval base], if not all of it" is at risk of flooding "because it's so low and it's flat."

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NPR Story
1:26 am
Tue June 24, 2014

With Cash And Fat Fryers, Americans Feed Cuba's Growing Free Market

A man stands in line at Miami International airport to board a charter flight to Havana, Cuba. Travelers often fly to Cuba from the U.S. with piles of goods, despite a decades-long trade embargo.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 10:38 am

Every day, you can see signs of a subtle change in relations between Cuba and the U.S. at Miami International Airport.

More Cubans than ever before are coming to the U.S. to visit, and the number of Cuban-Americans traveling back to the island is also at record levels. With all the visitors, money and goods are now traveling to the island from the United States.

It's a legal loophole in the 50-year-old trade embargo — one that's having a real impact on Cuba's economy, and allowing Cuban-Americans to become investors in Cuba's emerging private sector.

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Code Switch
5:38 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Congressman Rangel Battles For Political Survival

Rep. Charles Rangel, a Democrat from New York, speaks during a June interview in New York.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:13 pm

Charles Rangel, who for 44 years has represented an Upper Manhattan district that includes Harlem, faces off against three opponents in the New York Democratic primary Tuesday. The most serious challenge comes from state Sen. Adriano Espaillat.

Rangel was first elected to the House of Representatives in 1970, defeating the legendary Adam Clayton Powell Jr. — the first African-American elected to Congress from New York. He has held the seat ever since, rising to power in Washington and at one time serving as head of the powerful Ways and Means Committee.

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Men In America
4:14 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

The New American Man Doesn't Look Like His Father

While life has changed significantly for American men in the past half-century, notions of masculinity remain tied to those that may have been passed down from this father to the son on his shoulders.
Evans/Three Lions Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 9:36 am

This summer, All Things Considered is exploring what it means to be a man in America today. In some ways, the picture for men has changed dramatically over the past 50 years. More women than men are going to college, and the economy is moving away from jobs that traditionally favored men, like manufacturing and mining. Attitudes have also changed on the social front, with young men having more egalitarian attitudes toward women and expectations of being involved fathers.

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Shots - Health News
3:02 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Pharmaceutical Companies Accuse Hospitals Of Misusing Discounts

David Chance recuperates at Oregon Health and Science University.
Kristian Foden-Vencil Oregon Public Broadcasting

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:07 pm

In 1992, the federal government told drugmakers they had to give steep discounts to hospitals that treat a large percentage of poor patients.

The law got bipartisan support and it was a boon for hospitals and the federal government. In the decades that followed, the discount program has grown by leaps and bounds.

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Politics
2:24 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

In Oklahoma Senate Race, A Choice Between Two Deep Shades Of Red

State Rep. T.W. Shannon (left) talks with U.S. Rep. James Lankford following a June 6 Republican candidate forum for the open U.S. Senate seat in Lawton, Okla.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:07 pm

In Oklahoma, Republicans will vote Tuesday on a nominee to finish the term of current GOP Sen. Tom Coburn, who is retiring at year-end with two years left to spare. For the two front-runners, Rep. James Lankford and former state House Speaker T.W. Shannon, immigration has suddenly become an issue in the race.

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Shots - Health News
2:17 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Parents Get Some Help In Teaching Their Teens To Drive

No, your other right! Most parents would probably welcome some help when it comes to teaching teenage drivers.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 2:28 pm

Parents often take the lead in teaching their teenage children to drive, even though their own memories of starting out behind the wheel may be hazy at best.

And since car crashes are the top cause of teen deaths in the United States. claiming more than 2,700 teen lives in 2010 and sending another 282,000 to the emergency room, it's a task that parents really need to get right.

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Religion
2:12 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

In Trial, Movement To Ordain Mormon Women Approaches Defining Moment

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:51 pm

Since the founding of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1830, only men have been allowed to be ordained as priests. As Dan Bammes of KUER reports, a chorus of women has been asking church leaders to reconsider that policy. One Mormon feminist, in particular, has just been expelled from the church for her activism.

Iraq
2:07 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Kerry Lands In Badhdad, Bearing Warnings For Iraqi Leaders

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:07 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Law
2:07 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

In 'Drone Memo,' A Step Toward Transparency On Targeting Americans

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:07 pm

On Monday, a federal court made public a long-secret memo that lays out the Obama administration's legal justification for killing an American citizen in a drone strike. The memo, which concerns the 2011 killing of Anwar Al-Awlaki, says that the man presented an imminent threat to the United States.

Shots - Health News
2:04 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

After The Fall, A Young Man Chronicles His Life With Multiple Sclerosis

Jason DaSilva was on a family vacation in 2006 when he fell and couldn't get up. His multiple sclerosis symptoms have progressed to the point that he can't walk.
Factory Release

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 2:29 pm

At age 25, Jason DaSilva had everything — he was smart, talented, good-looking and traveling the world as a documentary filmmaker. Then he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

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History
1:14 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

50 Years Ago, Students Fought For Black Rights During 'Freedom Summer'

Fannie Lou Hamer was an activist who spoke out for black rights during Freedom Summer.
Courtesy of Ken Thompson/General Board of Global Ministries of The United Methodist Church

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:50 pm

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer, a movement to open the polls to blacks in Mississippi and end white supremacy in the state.

Freedom Summer was organized by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, or SNCC, which recruited 700 college students — mostly white students from the North — to travel to Mississippi and help African-Americans register to vote. The organizers, the students and the black people trying to register were all risking their lives, a measure of how pervasive racism was at the time.

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NPR Ed
12:11 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Be A Varsity Player ... In Video Games?

League of Legends is a video game with 70 million players a month.
Riot Games, Inc

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 1:22 pm

Imagine the lede in the campus newspaper:

The Eagles swept to a win last night in 100 hours of tournament gameplay. Tabbz made the absolute best usage of the shields and heals that were available to him. Froggen went for utility and pushing power, while Nyph's black shields were near perfect, and he hit a bunch of bindings. Airwak's Lee Sin kick ended the encounter with a massive multicolor explosion.

Monday morning quarterbacking will never be the same.

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Law
11:03 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Central Park Five Settlement: Was Justice Served?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:22 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Portugal Snatches Victory From U.S., Match Ends 2-2

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

You know, I was driving with the windows down on Sunday afternoon and suddenly heard roaring crowds cheering and chanting U.S.A.. It was a lovely summer day here in Washington, D.C., and the car rolled between two outdoor restaurants where people watching the World Cup on TV saw the U.S. score a goal to go ahead. In the end, the U.S. only tied Portugal 2 to 2. They were playing in the city of Manaus, in the thick heat and humidity of the Brazilian Amazon. NPR's Tom Goldman was there.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING)

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NPR Ed
2:32 am
Mon June 23, 2014

To Boost Attendance, Milwaukee Schools Revive Art, Music And Gym

Students in gym class at Richard Kluge Elementary in Milwaukee. Two years ago, the students had no gym, art, or music classes but that's changing as Milwaukee Public Schools re-hires teachers for these classes.
Erin Toner WUWM

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 1:00 pm

In the stuffy, little gymnasium at Richard Kluge Elementary in Milwaukee, 16 boys and girls are stretching, jumping and marching to music.

Two years ago, the school had no gym, art or music classes due to budget cuts. But now, Kluge students get a so-called "special" class three days a week.

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Shots - Health News
1:29 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Hospitals To Pay Big Fines For Infections, Avoidable Injuries

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:32 am

Medicare is preparing to penalize about 750 hospitals that have the highest rates of infections and patient injuries. The sanctions, estimated to total $330 million over a year, will kick in at a time when most infections and accidents in hospitals are on the decline, but still too common.

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Shots - Health News
1:27 am
Mon June 23, 2014

How A Woman's Plan To Kill Herself Helped Her Family Grieve

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 3:06 pm

This story is in no way an endorsement of suicide. It's a description of one woman's choice and what came of it.

Five years ago, after doctors told her that she had Alzheimer's disease that would eventually steal her ability to read, write and recognize people, Sandy Bem decided to kill herself.

Sandy was 65 years old, an unsentimental woman and strong willed. For her, a life without books and the ability to recognize the people she loved wasn't a life she wanted.

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World
3:09 pm
Sun June 22, 2014

With Changes To Guantanamo Trials, A New Feel To Proceedings

Originally published on Sun June 22, 2014 4:25 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Law
2:30 pm
Sun June 22, 2014

Georgia's New Pro-Gun Law Triggers Confusion For Some Residents

Protesters participate in the Guns Across America rally at the state capitol in Atlanta in 2013. The Safe Carry Protection Act goes into effect on July 1, but it's already creating confusion for many Georgia residents.
Tami Chappell Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:11 am

Starting on July 1, when the Safe Carry Protection Act goes into effect, Georgians with gun permits will have many more places to take their weapons. The law is considered the most sweeping pro-gun measure passed in the U.S. this year. Opponents call it the "Guns Everywhere" bill.

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Fine Art
9:59 am
Sun June 22, 2014

'The Illustrated Courtroom' Finds Art In Real-Life Legal Drama

Artist Elizabeth Williams sketched NPR's Rachel Martin during their conversation.
Elizabeth Williams

Originally published on Sun June 22, 2014 11:26 am

For some trials, courtroom sketches are the only images the public ever sees. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with artist Elizabeth Williams about her new book, which looks at 50 years of such drawings.

Shots - Health News
9:36 am
Sun June 22, 2014

Shortage Of Saline Solution Has Hospitals On Edge

Reid Kennedy, materials manager at San Francisco General Hospital, stands next to racks of saline solution. He has had to carefully manage the hospital's supply of saline during this shortage.
Mark Andrew Boyer KQED

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 7:09 am

Hospitals across the country are struggling with a shortage of one of their essential medical supplies.

Manufacturers are rationing saline solution — essentially pharmaceutical-grade saltwater. The stuff is used all around hospitals to clean wounds, mix medications or treat dehydration. Now drug companies say they won't be able to catch up with demand until next year.

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Health Care
6:01 am
Sun June 22, 2014

In LA, Barbers Cut Hair And Check Blood Pressure

Originally published on Sun June 22, 2014 10:19 am

A Los Angeles doctor is training barbers to check their customers for high blood pressure. He's targeting the social hubs for black men because of the health risks associated with hypertension.

Law
6:01 am
Sun June 22, 2014

Sexual Harassment, Abuse Systemic In Modeling World

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 5:00 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
3:00 am
Sun June 22, 2014

Americans Weigh Addiction Risk When Taking Painkillers

Generic hydrocodone plus acetaminophen pills seen in a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt., in 2013.
Toby Talbot AP

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 5:55 am

Prescriptions for narcotic painkillers have surged in recent years. Fatal overdoses and abuse of the drugs have risen, too. Doctors and patients are grappling with how to balance the need for pain relief with the potential for trouble.

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It's All Politics
2:57 am
Sun June 22, 2014

Hillary Clinton, The Inevitable? Sure Seems Like It

Sometimes, you just have to accept the inevitable. But there are a couple years left until the Democratic presidential nominee is officially chosen.
Steven Senne AP

The jockeying for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination is already shaping up to be nothing like the 2008 contest. Indeed, it doesn't even resemble a contest. It's not going too far out on a limb to say that, unlike six years ago, the nomination is Hillary Clinton's for the taking, if she wants it.

This will inevitably lead to the idea of her inevitability — and there are few words in politics more despised than that one.

Presidential aspirants have a love-hate relationship with that word when it's attached to them.

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Code Switch
12:41 pm
Sat June 21, 2014

Some Of Us Sacrifice More To Stay In Home Sweet Home

Despite the challenges to finding affordable housing, blacks and Latinos still say they feel like home ownership is an excellent investment.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Sat June 21, 2014 2:30 pm

If it seems like we talk about housing a lot on Code Switch, it's because we do. But the fact is it's really hard to talk about all the ways race correlates to different outcomes — in health or education, say— without talking about where people live. Take household wealth, for example: The major reason whites have so much more of it is because of how much likelier they are not just to own homes, but to own homes in places where that property might appreciate in value.

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Middle East
9:22 am
Sat June 21, 2014

Talks Yield Possible Framework For Iran Nuclear Deal

Originally published on Sat June 21, 2014 9:52 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Negotiators trying to ensure that Iran has only a peaceful nuclear program have less than a month to reach an agreement. A week of talks in Vienna yielded the potential beginnings of a deal. But thorny problems remain unresolved.

As NPR's Peter Kenyon reports, U.S. and Iranian negotiators also spent time fending off questions about the crisis in Iraq.

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The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Sat June 21, 2014

The Runner-Up Religions Of America

Courtesy of the ASARB

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:30 am

Glance at the map above, Second Largest Religious Tradition in Each State 2010, and you will see that Buddhism (orange), Judaism (pink) and Islam (blue) are the runner-up religions across the country.

No surprises there. But can you believe that Hindu (dark orange) is the No. 2 tradition in Arizona and Delaware, and that Baha'i (green) ranks second in South Carolina?

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