U.S. News

Education
3:13 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Sequestration Knocks Nearly 60,000 Kids Out Of Head Start

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 4:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. We begin this hour in the classroom. In a moment, a new tax break in Alabama to help get kids out of failing schools and the parents who oppose it. But first, a word we haven't hear much of lately, sequestration. The federal government is reporting big cuts today for Head Start. The preschool program for low income three and four-year-olds serves close to a million kids.

But as NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports, this fall, many will be left out.

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U.S.
3:13 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

3 Years Later, There's Still Work Left To Be Done On Dodd-Frank

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 4:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

Today, President Obama called all of the country's top financial regulators to the White House to get a progress report on implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act. That's the set of reforms that were passed following the financial crisis. With the fifth anniversary of the financial meltdown nearing, the president wants to communicate a sense of urgency about following through on the reforms.

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Around the Nation
3:13 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Comptroller Compfusion: How Do You Pronounce It?

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 4:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

When former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer returned to politics this summer, he sparked a lively discussion about second chances in public life. He also provoked debate about another vexing question, the correct way to pronounce the title of the city's top financial official. Spitzer is running for the office of comptroller or, as some of our listeners insist, controller. So what is the right pronunciation?

As NPR's Joe Rose found out, the answer may depend on who you ask.

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Shots - Health News
2:09 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Kids Involved in Bullying Grow Up To Be Poorer, Sicker Adults

It hurts now. And it hurts later, too.
iStockphoto.com

Bullied children and kids who bully others have more health problems when they grow up than kids who aren't part of the bullying cycle, a study finds. They're also more likely to have financial problems, including difficulty keeping a job.

The findings run counter to a still-widespread notion that bullying is a childhood rite of passage with little lasting harm, the researchers say.

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The Salt
1:43 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Incredibly Shrinking Avocados: Why This Year's Fruit Are So Tiny

We found lots of avocados being sold six or 10 to a $1 bag in the San Francisco area. Some weighed less than 3 ounces.
Alastair Bland for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:40 am

What's thick-skinned and leathery, about the size of an egg, essential for guacamole and sold eight for a dollar?

No, not limes. Hass avocados. This year, anyway. These pear-sized fruits usually weigh half a pound or more. In the summer of 2013, though, hundreds of thousands of trees in Southern California are sagging with the tiniest Hass avocados in local memory β€” some just the size of a golf ball.

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Media
10:12 am
Mon August 19, 2013

First Look At New Al-Jazeera America Network

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 8:14 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee, Michel Martin is away. Coming up, the images of the Civil Rights Movement have been captured in photographs, and in a moment - minutes, we'll hear from artist Faith Ringgold about telling that history through paintings. But first, we turn to a new phase in broadcast television. The cable TV channel Al Jazeera America launches tomorrow.

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Health
10:12 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Obamacare Raises Concerns About Doctor Deficit

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:24 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, sticklers might complain that social media is actually ruining the English language, but we'll talk to a professor who says just the opposite. He says platforms like Twitter can be used to increase literacy - more in a moment.

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Middle East
2:52 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Members Of Congress Urged To Cut Aid To Egypt

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 4:52 am

The U.S. has been unable to do much to reduce the violence in Egypt. President Obama canceled upcoming joint military exercises, and says the administration is looking at other options, perhaps affecting the $1.5 billion in military aid the U.S. provides Egypt each year. For more insight, Renee Montagne talks to Nathan Brown, a scholar of Middle East politics with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and George Washington University.

The Two-Way
12:40 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Has Voyager 1 Left The Solar System?

This artist rendering provided by NASA shows Voyager 1 at the edge of the solar system.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 12:52 pm

The Voyager 1 spacecraft launched in 1977 on a mission to Jupiter and Saturn. It kept on going. Today it's billions of miles from Earth, and scientists have been predicting it will soon leave the solar system.

NPR has been on Voyager watch since at least 2003, when longtime science correspondent Richard Harris provided this warning of Voyager's impending departure.

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Around the Nation
3:07 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Cars In America: Is The Love Story Over?

Classic cars of all makes and models drive the 16-mile stretch along Woodward Avenue during the annual Dream Cruise in 2009 in Ferndale, Mich. During the annual event, the glory days of car culture return, if only for a day.
Jerry S. Mendoza AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:29 pm

Almost as soon as they started rolling off the assembly lines, automobiles became synonymous with freedom. And in the post-World War II boom our relationship with cars intensified.

It was about horsepower, status, being American, and for young people: rebellion. For generations cars inspired countless songs, books and movies. But now there are signs that our car culture is losing some of its shine.

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The Two-Way
2:24 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

U.S. Investigators Launch Probe Of JPMorgan Chase In China

The office of the locally incorporated JPMorgan Chase Bank in Beijing.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:49 pm

The Securities and Exchange Commission has launched an investigation of JPMorgan Chase's operations in China, reportedly looking into whether the investment bank hired the children of high-ranking Chinese government officials in an effort to secure business.

The Wall Street Journal quotes from an SEC filing that says U.S. regulators are investigating "business relationships with certain clients."

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The Two-Way
1:12 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Penn State Reaches Settlement With First Of Abuse Victims

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky leaves the Centre County Courthouse in Bellefonte, Pa., after being sentenced in his child sex abuse case in October of last year.
Patrick Smith Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 1:43 pm

A man who claimed sexual abuse by former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky has reached a multimillion-dollar settlement with the university, the first of numerous such claims expected to be resolved in the coming days.

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Shots - Health News
12:47 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

What's My Real Cancer Risk? When Online Calculators Don't Compute

Whether or not you'll someday get cancer or any disease can feel like a roll of hundreds of dice. Calculating the odds --€” and knowing what they mean --€” is tricky.
Katie Harbath Flickr

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 9:31 am

Online risk calculators are all the rage these days among public health groups trying to get us to change our unhealthful ways. The World Health Organization developed an online tool that lets you estimate your personal risk of cracking a hip in the next 10 years, for example. You just plug in data about yourself, your lifestyle, and your family medical history.

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Around the Nation
4:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

When This Island Organ Plays, It's A Step Back In Time

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Off the coast of Southern California, on Santa Catalina Island, the vacation town of Avalon is celebrating its 100th birthday this summer. NPR's Kirk Siegler paid a visit and he met a man who keeps once piece of the town's history alive.

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Race
4:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Atlanta Celebrates King's Dream

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This weekend, the city of Atlanta kicked off its own celebration to mark the anniversary. People gathered at the Martin Luther King National Historic Site and at the Center for Nonviolence. This is the beginning of more than a week of national events to commemorate King's "I Have a Dream," speech.

As NPR's Kathy Lohr reports, the festivities started in the city where King was born.

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Race
4:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Quote Corrected On MLK Memorial

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The Martin Luther King Junior memorial in Washington, D.C. will be ready for the 50th anniversary of the civil rights March on Washington. The sculpture, which looks out on the city's tidal basin has been covered in scaffolding to correct an inscription on the monument. Since it was put up in 2011, it has had a truncated version of a quotation from a speech King gave in 1968.

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It's All Politics
2:47 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Amid Struggle For 'Soul' Of GOP, Libertarians Take Limelight

Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan, a libertarian Republican, says recent surveillance leaks have "brought home" libertarian ideas.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:16 am

"There is no question that there is a civil war that is waging within the party."

That Republican conflict, political science professor David Cohen adds, isn't between just two sides, but among a number of factions, including libertarians.

One of the most public battles has involved national security and civil liberties. Leaks about the National Security Agency's surveillance programs raised alarms for libertarians about the government's reach.

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The Two-Way
2:12 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Fire Threatens Celebrity Resort Homes In Idaho

In this photo released by the U.S. Forest Service, firefighters stand watch near the perimeter of the Elk Complex fire near Pine, Idaho, earlier this week.
Uncredited Associated Press

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 2:22 pm

An evacuation order in Idaho has been expanded to include 1,600 homes, including many in the resort community of Sun Valley, officials say.

The 100-square mile Beaver Creek Fire expanded rapidly on Friday, whipped up by 30 mph winds and low humidity, officials say.

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It's All Politics
9:48 am
Sat August 17, 2013

RNC Isn't Focusing On The Elephant In Its Ballroom

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus introduces the first four members of its new "Rising Stars" program at the RNC summer meeting on Thursday in Boston. From left are Karin Agness, founder of Network of Enlightened Women; T.W. Shannon, Oklahoma speaker of the House; Priebus; New Hampshire state Rep. Marilinda Garcia; and San Jose, Calif., police officer Scott Erickson.
Josh Reynolds AP

They talked about the Hillary Clinton documentary and miniseries. They talked about how well they're doing raising money. They talked about how they're building a state-of-the-art data mining and voter turnout operation.

Here's what the Republican National Committee members didn't talk about at their summer meeting, but, rather, talked around: their existential need to broaden their base of support, and how so far their traditional base is not exactly embracing the idea.

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Architecture
5:55 am
Sat August 17, 2013

The Multimillion-Dollar Snafu Over $100 Bills

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 5:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Hundred dollar bills don't stretch as far as they used to. They're also getting a little frazzled. New 100 dollar bills were supposed to replace them over two years ago, but the Federal Reserve pushed back the date in 2010 because of a printing error.

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Around the Nation
5:55 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Children's Hospital DJs Spin A Dose Of Joy

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 5:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There are close to 70 radio stations in Miami, but one of them isn't like the others.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO STATION I.D.)

UNIDENTIFIED DJ: You're listening to Radio Lollipop.

SIMON: Radio Lollipop has sky-high ratings and a devoted audience. It broadcasts from inside the Miami Children's Hospital to its 300 young patients. Reporter Judith Ritter paid a visit.

JUDITH RITTER, BYLINE: Most radio DJs don't look like Dazzling Dave, especially when he wears his red superman cape.

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Strange News
5:55 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Government Reveals The Secret Of Area 51

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 5:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Area 51 is real.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Race
5:55 am
Sat August 17, 2013

What's Wrong With Mandatory Sentencing?

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 9:56 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This week, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder proposed reducing mandatory minimum sentences for some drug offenders. Federal mandated drug-sentencing guidelines have been around since the 1980s and they are thought to contribute to the huge increase in the number of inmates in U.S. prisons. But what has the affect of mandatory sentencing been on courts and communities?

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Asia
4:02 am
Sat August 17, 2013

To Care For U.S. Kids, Filipinas Leave Their Own Behind

Lita and her son, Myke, now live in Houston together. She still works as a nanny and Myke is an interior designer. Lita's two daughters have also immigrated to the United States.
Ashley Westerman For NPR

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 2:53 pm

Few American mothers could fathom a situation that would force them to leave their country in order to put food in their children's bellies, clothes on their backs and send them to school. This is the reality for many Filipina women, who cross oceans in search of jobs that pay enough to provide for their families back home.

The Philippines is known worldwide for sending its citizens overseas to work, and a recent study has shown the country consistently deploys more women than men. In the United States, Filipinas are often nurses and caretakers; many work as nannies

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Politics
4:02 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Immigration Reform Activists March To Calif. Farm Country

Marchers kick off a 21-day march calling for immigration reform in Sacramento, Calif. on Monday. The 285-mile walk through California's Central Valley ended in Bakersfield at the district office of House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 5:35 am

Immigrant and farm worker rights groups came from Los Angeles to Bakersfield, Calif., by the busload this week. Bakersfield, in the state's Central Valley, is farm country, and immigration is a complex issue here.

The groups were converging on the home of the third-most powerful Republican in the House, Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy.

Activists across the country are targeting a number of Republican members of Congress this summer, trying to pressure the House to take up the immigration reform bill passed in the Senate.

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The Two-Way
5:00 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

N.J. Governor Gives Provisional OK to Medical Pot For Kids

Marijuana plants growing at a legal not-for-profit medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles last year.
David McNew Getty Images

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie agreed to ease restrictions on medical marijuana for chronically ill children, but he won't go as far as lawmakers would like.

NPR's Joel Rose reports that Christie, a Republican, has rejected part of a bill that would allow young patients access to an ingestible form of marijuana at state-approved dispensaries without the approval of a psychiatrist and pediatrician.

His partial veto sends the bill back to the Democratic-controlled Legislature for approval before it becomes law.

The Associated Press reports:

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Politics
4:01 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

In Rural N.C., New Voter ID Law Awakens Some Old Fears

Opponents of North Carolina's new voter ID legislation wear tape over their mouths while sitting in the gallery of the House chamber of the North Carolina General Assembly in Raleigh, N.C., on April 24, where lawmakers debated new voter laws. On Monday, Gov. Pat McCrory signed a new law that requires a state-approved photo ID to vote and cuts early-voting opportunities.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:51 pm

This week, North Carolina's governor signed a new law requiring a state-approved photo ID to cast a vote in a polling place and shortening the period for early voting. The move comes just weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court invalidated a key provision of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which had required large parts of the state to get federal approval before changing voting laws.

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Research News
3:44 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

N. America's Oldest Known Petroglyphs Discovered In Nevada

Courtesy of Larry Benson

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:22 pm

Ancient North Americans gouged elaborate rock art into a heap of big boulders northeast of Reno, Nev., more than 10,000 years ago and perhaps 15,000 years ago. That makes the carvings the oldest known petroglyphs on the continent, according to a paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

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Around the Nation
3:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Summer Nights: Dancing In Chicago

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Do you want to learn the samba in Chicago, or perhaps the Lindy hop or the waltz? Maybe you want to know exactly how one gets jiggy. Well, all you have to do is wander into Grant Park in the summer, Chicago's Summer Dance is the nation's largest annual outdoor dance series. And for our series, Summer Nights, NPR's Sonari Glinton stopped by Grant Park for a tango.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: Just after work on a Thursday evening, you can see crowds forming in the Spirit of Music Garden on the edge of Grant Park.

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Sports
3:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Marion Bartoli Retires From Tennis At The Top Of Her Game

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And Audie Cornish. Just 40 days after winning the women's singles title at Wimbledon, Marion Bartoli of France announced on Wednesday that she's retiring from tennis at age 28. Bartoli now joins a relatively short list of top athletes who decided to call it quits in their prime. Sports writer Stefan Fatsis joins us now, as he does most Fridays. Hey there, Stefan.

STEFAN FATSIS, BYLINE: Hey, Audie.

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