U.S. News

Education
2:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

There's Not Enough Work For Veterinarians

There are way more veterinarians than there is work for them to do, according to a recent survey by the American Veterinary Medical Association.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

There are way more veterinarians than there is work for them to do, according to a recent survey by the American Veterinary Medical Association, as the nation's veterinary schools continue to crank out graduates.

A report from the American Veterinary Medical Association estimates the supply exceeds the demand by the equivalent of 11,250 full-time vets.

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Sports
2:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Was 1973 'Battle Of The Sexes' Tennis Match Thrown?

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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Law
2:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Liens By 'Sovereign Citizens' A Headache For State Officials

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The New York Times reported last week on the practice of placing bogus liens against the property of government officials. It's a tactic of self-styled sovereign citizens, people who deny the legitimacy of the federal government. They take advantage of laws, both real estate laws and also the Uniform Commercial Code, that make it easy to file liens even if they're phony. Why do they do it? Well, because a lien can ruin your credit rating, and removing one, even a phony lien, can take countless hours in court and cost thousands of dollars.

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Remembrances
2:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Muriel Siebert Was One Of the First Women Of Wall Street

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Muriel Siebert, the first woman to own a seat on the New York Stock Exchange, died over the weekend in Manhattan. She was 84. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, Siebert was a pioneer who broke down numerous doors in the male-dominated world of Wall Street.

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Around the Nation
2:45 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Fire Near Yosemite Grows To Nearly 150,000 Acres

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel and we begin this hour in California, in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, not far from Yosemite National Park. That's where fire crews are starting to make some progress in their fight against the massive Rim Fire that's been burning for nine days now. It has scorched nearly 150,000 acres. Relatively few structures have been lost so far, but thousands of people remain under evacuation orders.

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Sports
2:45 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Clint Dempsey Leaves Behind Stellar Resume To Join MLS

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Last night, the Seattle Sounders defeated arch-rival Portland, one-to-nothing, or since this is soccer, we say one-nil. This was the home debut of Seattle's Clint Dempsey, one of the best American soccer players in the game. Dempsey had been playing in the English Premier League, arguably the best league in the world. And he was very successful. So why come back to the MLS, Major League Soccer?

Well, NPR's Mike Pesca asked Dempsey that question and got his outlook for next year's World Cup.

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Around the Nation
2:45 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Tourism Business Evaporates As Yosemite Fire Burns On

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And now to one of those people affected by the Rim Fire. Steven Anker, he co-owns the Priest Station Cafe. That's about a 30-minute drive west of Yosemite along highway 120. Normally, the cafe bustles with tourists stopping by for a bite to eat on their way to the park. But since the fire began, he says, business has evaporated.

STEVEN ANKER: Two weeks ago, we had about probably 80 people. So right now we have no one. And we've had three meals all day.

BLOCK: Three customers total.

ANKER: Yes.

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All Tech Considered
11:54 am
Mon August 26, 2013

'I'd Tap That' And Other NSA Pickup Lines Are All The Rage

An anti-NSA protester in Washington, DC.
Steve Rhodes Flickr

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:58 pm

News that National Security Agency officers sometimes abuse domestic intelligence gathering practices to monitor potential love interests has led to a sweeping, satirical response by The People of The Internet. On Tumblr and Twitter, the #NSAPickupLines and #NSALovePoems hashtags have sparked all sorts of creativity from users poking fun at the potential intrusion of the NSA into our personal lives.

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Shots - Health News
10:37 am
Mon August 26, 2013

A Chat With The Doctor Can Help Kids Resist Smoking

Almost all adult smokers say they got their start before age 18.
iStockphoto.com

Doctors do make a difference when it comes to keeping children and teenagers from taking up tobacco. This may sound like a no-brainer, but until recently there wasn't strong evidence that anti-smoking efforts by pediatricians and other primary care doctors make a difference.

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History
9:54 am
Mon August 26, 2013

MLK's Dream Across Decades

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
9:54 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Former Sec. Of Education Wants More Support For Teachers

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:43 am
Mon August 26, 2013

'Fire Tracker': Online Tool To Monitor Blaze Near Yosemite

Some of the flames Saturday as the "Rim Fire" spread near Northern California's Yosemite National Park.
Elias Funez MCT /Landov

Hundreds of firefighters are "digging trenches, clearing brush and starting back blazes to keep a wildfire raging north of Yosemite National Park out of several mountain hamlets," The Associated Press writes Monday morning in its latest update on the huge "Rim Fire" that is threatening some of the power and water services to the city of San Francisco.

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Shots - Health News
1:45 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Sweet Cigarillos And Cigars Lure Youths To Tobacco, Critics Say

Candy-flavored cigars like these in a shop in Albany, N.Y., are the focus of efforts to restrict sales of sweet-flavored tobacco.
Hans Pennink Associated Press

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 12:56 pm

The good news: Cigarette sales are down by about a third over the past decade. Not so for little cigars and cigarillos. Their sales more than doubled over the same time period, in large part owing to the growing popularity of these little cigars among teenagers and 20-somethings.

The appeal among young people has lots to do with the large variety of candylike flavors in the little cigars, according to Jennifer Cantrell, director of research and evaluation at the anti-tobacco Legacy Foundation.

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Shots - Health News
1:42 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Kids With Costly Medical Issues Get Help, But Not Enough

Katie Doderer, with dad Mark, big sister Emily, and mom Marcy, has a rare medical condition that requires 24-hour use of a ventilator.
courtesy of the Doderer family

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 7:56 am

Katie Doderer is a very poised 15-year-old with short blond hair and a wide smile. She's a straight A student who loves singing, dancing and performing in musicals.

This could be considered something of a miracle.

"I have a complex medical condition known as congenital central hypoventilation – blah—syndrome. CCHS," Katie explains, stumbling on the full name of her malady. "Basically my brain doesn't tell me to breathe. So I am reliant on a mechanical ventilator."

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The March On Washington At 50
1:40 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Two Officers, Black And White, On Walking The '63 March Beat

Joseph Burden (third row, third from right) with his graduating class at Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department training academy in 1960. Every officer on the force was required to work the day of the March on Washington.
Courtesy of Joseph Burden

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 7:58 am

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream Speech" Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capital from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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Sports
3:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Quitting Your Job For Fantasy Football

Fantasy sports attract an estimated 36+ million players in the U.S. and Canada.
istockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 4:04 pm

You may just call it late summer; for many die-hard sports fans, it's called fantasy football drafting season.

Fantasy sports is a huge business, with an estimated 36 million people in the U.S. and Canada picking teams and talkin' trash, according to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association.

And now we may be at a tipping point.

One man - Drew Dinkmeyer - actually left his job as an investment analyst to play fantasy sports full-time.

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Around the Nation
6:04 am
Sun August 25, 2013

The Longest Mail Route In The Country

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to leave you today with an image: a long road, an open sky and a guy in a truck with a mission. This past week, a story caught our eye. Seventy-two-year-old Jim Ed Bull has what the postal service says is the longest postal delivery route in the country. Five days a week, Bull delivers mail along 187.6 miles of road in rural Oklahoma. We called Mr. Bull up to see what those long drives are like.

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Law
6:04 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Justice Department Gets Aggressive On Voting Rights

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

One of the central achievements of the civil rights movement was the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which protected minority voters. This summer, the U.S. Supreme Court threw out a key section of the landmark law. After that decision, Texas, along with other states, moved to impose new voting restrictions.

The U.S. Justice Department says those changes are discriminatory. And this past week, the department filed suit against the State of Texas.

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Race
6:04 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Thousands Gather To Mark '63 Civil Rights March

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Tens of thousands of people from across the country came to the National Mall yesterday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. At that historic march, Martin Luther King, Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and delivered one of the most iconic speeches in American history.

CROWD: Yeah.

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Race
5:57 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Ancient African Religion Finds Roots In America

Priest Ifagbemi has an elaborate shrine to Yoruba's gods in his home near Seattle.
Christopher Johnson NPR

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:05 am

In the suburbs of Seattle, an ancient West-African religion is gaining followers. Yoruba, from the Yoruba people of Nigeria, has been spreading across the U.S. for the last 50 years.

The religion is particularly popular with African-Americans who find it offers a spiritual path and a deep sense of cultural belonging.

Looking For Answers

Wesley Hurt's Yoruba story begins the night he met his wife, Cheri Profit. It was nearly eight years ago, not long after a tour in Iraq. He had just gotten off for weekend release from an Army base in Tacoma, Wash.

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Shots - Health News
3:17 am
Sun August 25, 2013

The Same Tents That Seal Storms Out Can Seal Carbon Monoxide In

Headlamps make cold nights cozier, but leave the fuel-burning lanterns and stoves outside.
Gopal Vijayaraghavan Flickr

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 6:31 am

Staying snug within a watertight tent as a storm rages around you is one of the joys of modern camping and modern tents.

But if the weather suddenly turns nasty on your next camping trip, or nights are just colder than you expected, don't be tempted to bring your cook stove inside. Levels of poisonous carbon monoxide (CO) from the burning stove can build up fast.

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It's All Politics
3:16 am
Sun August 25, 2013

A Guide To The Nation's Most Vulnerable Governors

Gov. Tom Corbett addresses a joint session of the Pennsylvania House and Senate on Feb. 5 in Harrisburg.
Matt Rourke AP

If you're looking for the most interesting gubernatorial races to watch in the coming year, the nation's biggest states are a good place to start.

Democrats Jerry Brown and Andrew Cuomo look like safe bets for re-election in California and New York, respectively. And, despite the pending retirement of Rick Perry, Republicans are confident of maintaining their hold on the governor's mansion in Texas.

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The Two-Way
10:55 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Second Panda Cub Stillborn, First Cub Fine, At National Zoo

In this image from video provided by the Smithsonian National Zoo, Mei Xiang gives birth to a cub two hours after her water broke Friday. A second cub born Saturday was stillborn.
AP

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:16 am

Keepers at the Smithsonian National Zoo, who were elated to report Friday that giant panda Mei Xiang gave birth to a cub, added a sad note Saturday with the news that a second cub was stillborn.

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Animals
3:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

It's Pandamonium Once Again In Washington, D.C.

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

We have a cub. The National Zoo made that announcement in all caps on Twitter at 5:32 p.m. last night. The zoo's giant panda, Mei Xiang, gave birth to her third cub Friday. Now there's a state of, wait for it, pandamonium here in Washington. Thousands of eyes were glued to the zoo's panda cam as the tiny creature came into the world.

(SOUNDBITE OF BABY PANDA)

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Remembrances
3:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Remembering Ethicist Jean Bethke Elshtain, Who Backed 'Justifiable War'

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Writer and ethicist Jean Bethke Elshtain died this month in Nashville, Tenn. She was 72. As a very specific kind of political theorist, Elshtain was known as a realist, unafraid to talk about God. It made her a unique and influential public intellectual of her time. Rather unusually, she held a joint appointment at the University of Chicago in both the divinity school and the political science department. William Schweiker was Elshtain's colleague at the U of C, and her friend; and he offered this remembrance.

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Law
3:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

In Tennessee Jail, It May Soon Be Pay To Stay

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

If you do the crime, you do the time. But if you're doing time at Anderson County Jail in Clinton, Tennessee, it may get a bit more expensive. This week, lawmakers in the county passed a resolution that would charge inmates for basic necessities: nine bucks for pants, $6.26 for a blanket, 29 cents for a roll of toilet paper.

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Race
3:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

50 Years Later, A March On Washington Among Generations

Demonstrators on Saturday in Washington, D.C., commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 1:55 pm

They came by the beat of drums: grandparents with their grandchildren, community organizers and activists, church members and college students.

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Art & Design
3:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Hacker-Artist's Mantra: 'Fun Makes The Politics Go Down'

Artwork from Roth's solo exhibition "Welcome to Detroit," on display at Eastern Michigan University in 2012.
Evan Roth

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

Evan Roth knows how to get a rise out of the people and organizations he targets.

Over his career, the Michigan-born "hacker-artist" has taken on Google, the Transportation Safety Administration, and — most bravely of all — Justin Bieber's fans, Beliebers.

Some might call him a prankster, a rabble-rouser, or an enfant terrible, but Roth prefers "hacker-artist" despite the connotation that "hacker" might hold for some people.

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Law
3:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

N.Y. County Outsources The Job Of Monitoring Sex Offenders

Troy Wallace with his wife, Lynda. Wallace is suing Suffolk County, N.Y., contending its new sex offender monitoring law violates his civil rights.
Charles Lane NPR

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

A suburban county on Long Island, N.Y., is taking a novel approach to monitoring sex offenders: It's giving the job to a victims' advocacy group.

The measure was approved unanimously earlier this year; lawmakers call it a cost-effective way to keep citizens safe. But a local lawyer calls it a "vigilante exercise," and convicted sex offenders are organizing to challenge the legislation.

'The Trackers'

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Code Switch
11:56 am
Sat August 24, 2013

While Unsung in '63, Women Weren't Just 'Background Singers'

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer of Ruleville, Miss., speaks to the state's Freedom Democratic Party sympathizers outside the Capitol in Washington, D.C., in 1965.
William J. Smith AP

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

On that sweltering August day in 1963, almost a quarter-million people thronged the National Mall, from the Washington Monument to the columned marble box that is the Lincoln Memorial. The crowning moment, of course, was Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech.

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