U.S. News

It's All Politics
3:48 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Semantic Gymnastics: GOP In Tug Of War Over Delegate Rule

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus opens last year's convention in Tampa, Fla., on Aug. 27.
Glen Stubbe MCT/Landov

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:36 am

Remember back when President Bill Clinton argued that his truthfulness about his affair with intern Monica Lewinsky depended on the meaning of the word "is"?

Thought so.

Though the topic may be decidedly less salacious, the Republican Party is embroiled in its own semantics gymnastics this week as its national committee members gather in Boston for their summer meeting.

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Code Switch
3:44 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Bayard Rustin: The Man Who Organized The March On Washington

Activist Bayard Rustin points to a map during a press conference four days ahead of the March on Washington in August 1963.
AP

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 2:03 pm

The trailblazing strategist behind the 1963 March on Washington will this year be posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. That's a long way from the days when civil rights activists counted on Bayard Rustin's hard work, but tried to push him aside because he was gay.

For 60 years, Rustin fought for peace and equal rights — demonstrating, organizing and protesting in the United States and around the world.

'Strategic Nonviolence'

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Sports
3:16 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

The Dodgers' 'Magical' Rise From The Cellar

Los Angeles Dodgers' Adrian Gonzalez (center left, holding helmet) is congratulated by teammates along with Yasiel Puig (No. 66) after Gonzalez hit a game-winning RBI double and Puig scored during the 12th inning of their game against the New York Mets on Wednesday.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

The Los Angeles Dodgers are the hottest team in baseball. They've won 40 of their last 48 games, and Wednesday night, they came from behind in dramatic fashion to beat the New York Mets in 12 innings.

It's a remarkable turnaround for a team that was near the cellar before the All-Star break. Now, they're calling Dodgers Stadium the Magic Castle. Attendance is up, TV ratings are up, star power is up. And the on-field play is "magical," according to legendary announcer Vin Scully.

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Shots - Health News
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Getting People Out Of Nursing Homes Turns Out To Be Complicated

Dorothy Holmes, back home with her new dog, Jack.
Martha Bebinger WBUR

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

Two years ago, Dorothy Holmes, then 75, was in the cozy pink bathroom of her home getting ready to shower when she fell. It's the type of accident that's common among older Americans — and it's often the very thing that triggers the end of independence.

"I got a big spot on my head; it almost conked me out," Holmes says in her soft voice.

She heard her husband come down the hall, "and when he turned the corner all I heard was, 'Oh God, honey, what did you do now?' After that I don't know anything 'cause I passed out," Holmes recalls.

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Politics
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

GOP Divided Over Whether It Needs Better Outreach, Nominees

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

The Republican National Committee meets this week in Boston with lots to argue about — if they choose to do so. There's immigration and Obamacare resistance and the 2016 presidential nominating system.

Law
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Pentagon Adds New Measures To Combat Sexual Assault

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

Under pressure from Congress, the Pentagon has announced additional measures to combat sexual assault. The Pentagon continues to resist proposals that would take prosecution of sexual assault out of the chain of command, but some lawmakers say that's the step that would make a difference.

Education
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

FAMU Marching Band Gets To Take Field Again After Hazing Death

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:18 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Members of the famed marching band at Florida A&M University learned today that they will once again be allowed to perform. It's been nearly two years since the band was last heard. The group was suspended following the hazing death of one of its drum majors. As Lynn Hatter of Florida Public Radio reports, the university says it will take work to prove times have changed.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Ladies and gentlemen, the Florida A&M University marching band.

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Animals
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

After Losing His Raccoon, Man Takes His Appeal To Governor

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

Mark "Coon Rippy" Brown, of Gallatin, Tenn., became an Internet sensation for posting videos online of himself bantering, dancing, even showering with his pet raccoons. He's now using his Internet fame to garner support, in an effort to get his pet raccoon Rebekah back from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, which recently seized the critter. It is illegal in Tennessee to possess native animals captured in the wild.

Economy
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Fears Of A Diminished Stimulus Send Stock Market Falling

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The stock market usually likes good news about the economy, but that's not always the case. This morning, stocks opened down sharply just after the government announced a surprisingly large drop in initial claims for unemployment benefits. In fact, claims fell to the lowest level since before the recession and the Dow Jones Industrials ended the day down 225 points, a decline of 1.5 percent.

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Around the Nation
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Students Return To School In Moore, Okla., As City Rebuilds

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

For students in Moore, Oklahoma it's not just new backpacks and pencils this year. For many, it's entirely new schools and homes. A tornado ripped through the community nearly three months ago. It destroyed two schools, killed seven students and 18 other people in the city. And tomorrow, students return to class.

Rachel Hubbard, of member station KOSU, checks in with Moore to see how the community is doing.

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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Ford Lowers Mileage Rating On Its C-Max Hybrid

A Ford C-MAX hybrid vehicle goes through assembly at the Michigan Assembly Plant in Wayne, last November.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:05 am

(Updated 8:40 p.m. ET)

Ford on Thursday backpedaled on the stated fuel economy for its C-Max hybrid after customer complaints and an EPA investigation found that the vehicle wasn't living up to its advertised 47 mpg.

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Beauty Shop
10:13 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Snooty Swiss Saleswoman Equals Racism?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we head to Barbados for a twisted family tale that spans centuries. "Sugar in the Blood" is the latest in our summer island read series. More on that in just a few minutes. But first, a visit to the beauty shop. That's where our panel of female commentators and journalists get a fresh cut on the week's news.

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All Tech Considered
12:57 am
Thu August 15, 2013

The Next Disaster Scenario Power Companies Are Preparing For

Part of the Robert Moses Niagara Power Plant in Lewiston, N.Y., is seen from the air on Aug. 14, 2003, during a massive power outage that stretched from New York to Detroit and into Canada.
David Duprey AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:49 am

In the 10 years since sagging power lines in Ohio sparked a blackout across much of the Northeastern United States and Canada, utility engineers say they have implemented measures to prevent another such event in the country's electric grid.

But there is one disaster scenario for which the power companies are still unprepared: a massive attack on the computer networks that underlie the U.S. electric grid.

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Business
12:56 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Pent-Up Demand Is Boosting Home Sales, But Can It Last?

Carpenters work on a housing site in Brandywine, Md., on May 31. Pent-up demand for homes could create jobs and help the struggling U.S. economy.
Gary Cameron Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 12:33 pm

Six years ago, the U.S. housing market plunged off a cliff. Now prices are bouncing back up — sharply in many markets.

That has some real estate analysts saying 2013 may mark the turning point — when pent-up demand will revive the housing sector and boost the broader economy.

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It's All Politics
4:02 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

A Lover Of Horse Races, And Horses: Remembering Jack Germond

Jack Germond, who died Wednesday at 85, was one of the legendary "boys on the bus" covering presidential politics.
David Burnett/Random House AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Political reporter Jack Germond smoked and loved martinis and red wine and fine food and betting on horses — he lived life large and didn't suffer phonies.

But here's the thing about Germond, who died Wednesday at age 85: He liked politicians. That's something you don't find much among reporters today.

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The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Gmail Users Shouldn't Expect Privacy, Google Says In Filing

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:13 pm

People who use Gmail and other free email systems have no reasonable expectation of privacy, according to papers filed in a U.S. district court by lawyers for Google. The filing was made in June, when Google moved to dismiss a case accusing it of breaking federal and state laws by scanning users' emails to help target its advertising campaigns.

In making its case, Google compared sending an email to other types of communications where privacy cannot be expected:

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Around the Nation
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Project To Fix Quote On MLK Memorial Hits Snags

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In the nation's capitol, a project to remove a disputed quotation from Martin Luther King Jr. memorial has stalled. The work may not be finished in time for the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington later this month. NPR's Allison Keyes tells us the issue is a finishing process that wasn't in the government's contract.

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Around the Nation
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Flood Insurance Rates Skyrocket In Coastal Communities

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Some homeowners in Louisiana and other coastal communities are now seeing their premiums for federal flood insurance skyrocket. For some residents, that means paying annual premiums more than 10 times their current rate. The cause? In part, a new law passed by Congress last year requiring the National Flood Insurance Program to raise premiums for some homeowners in high risk areas. The program has been struggling financially in recent years in the aftermath of major storms, like Hurricane Sandy.

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Energy
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

The Grid Of The Future Could Be Brought To You By ... You

Wind turbines at the Kahuku wind farm on Oahu's North Shore in 2011. Hawaiian energy managers are hoping to build stronger connections with customers to better manage renewable sources of energy on the grid.
Yuriko Nakao Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

The electricity system is experiencing growing pains these days. But it's not only demand for electricity that's expanding — it's the sources of electricity, particularly unpredictable kinds, like wind farms and solar panels.

And grid operators know that we're just at the beginning. States are requiring more renewable power to fight climate change, and it may be the customers who will play a big role in helping grid operators manage these clean, but finicky, sources of power.

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Law
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Former JPMorgan Chase Traders Charged Over 'White Whale' Bets

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Federal prosecutors have charged two former JPMorgan Chase traders with securities fraud. The two men worked in London. And they are part of the so-called London Whale case, which cost the company more than $6 billion. U.S. officials say the men lied about the value of some derivatives trades to cover up mounting lawsuits. More from NPR's Jim Zarroli.

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Law
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Jesse Jackson Jr. Sentenced To 30 Months In Prison

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Former Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. was sentenced to 30 months in prison today for using campaign funds to buy luxury goods. His wife also received a year in prison for filing false tax returns. Prosecutors called their joint crimes one of the worst abuses of campaign finance laws in recent memory. NPR's Jennifer Ludden was at the courthouse here in Washington, D.C.

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Business
2:52 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

More Companies Encourage Workers To Volunteer, On The Clock

Kristin Yentes (right) and other volunteers from U.S. Bank serve breakfast to diners at Catholic Charities Opportunity Center in Minneapolis. Workers from the bank have been volunteering with Catholic Charities for more than a year.
Jeffrey Thompson MPR

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

You're not likely to find many bankers wearing those old stereotypical green visors these days. But at U.S. Bank, some employees sport hairnets — at least when they're serving breakfast.

Every Friday morning, a group of U.S. Bank employees stands elbow to elbow at a Minneapolis soup kitchen, doling out French toast, sausage and other breakfast goodies. Most of the people getting free breakfast are homeless men who lug their belongings in plastic bags.

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The Two-Way
12:35 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

'Nothing Racist' Implied In 'Obama' Act, Says Rodeo Clown

A photo taken of the clown who wore a mask resembling President Obama during a rodeo Saturday at the Missouri State Fair.
Jameson Hsieh AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Tuffy Gessling, the rodeo clown at the center of the controversy over the skit at the Missouri State Fair in which a man wearing a President Obama mask was mocked, says "nothing racist was ever implied."

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Music
12:23 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

African-American Musicians, More Than Just Jazz

Johnny Linton, a music student, performs at the Gateways Music Festival's Youth Showcase Concert
Jim Hunter Gateways Music Festival

Jazz or blues may be the first thing that comes to mind we think of the contributions that African Americans have made to American music genres, but that overlooks the rich heritage of African- Americans in classical music. For two decades the Gateways Music Festival has challenged that image. This year the festival celebrates its 20th Anniversary in Rochester, New York and continues to celebrate the contributions of African-Americans to classical music by featuring world class musicians and conductors of African heritage.

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Law
11:50 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Past Immigration Policies Had A Reverse Effect, Professor Says

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 12:20 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Education
11:50 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Will 'Safe Passage' Routes Really Keep Chicago Kids Safe?

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 12:20 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we'll speak with one man who says beefing up the border security doesn't keep undocumented immigrants out. But it keeps them in. We'll hear that story in just a few minutes.

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Parallels
11:13 am
Wed August 14, 2013

French Maker Of Military Rafts Gets An American Identity

U.S. Marines with 4th Force Reconnaissance Company slide off F470 Combat Rubber Raiding Crafts during training in Waimanalo, Hawaii. The French company Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts for roughly two decades. Now the company is making the rafts in the U.S.
Lance Cpl. Reece E. Lodder Marine Corps Base Hawaii

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

For roughly two decades, the Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts. These rafts, especially the high-end model F470, are not the recreational rafts you take out to the lake on a Sunday, says Lionel Boudeau, the head of Zodiac's North America operations.

"It is used for a large variety of missions, like assault landings, infiltration and exfiltration," he says. "It can be deployed from the shore or deployed from the air by an aircraft, a helicopter, by a submarine. It is used by special forces and regular Army."

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All Tech Considered
7:27 am
Wed August 14, 2013

This Little Thing May Help You Find Your Keys

The Tile, accompanied by an iPhone app, locates items that are attached to it. It's about as small as a matchbook or a stamp.
Matt Perko Courtesy of Tile

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NPR Story
6:37 am
Wed August 14, 2013

UPS Plane Crashes Near Birmingham, Ala.; 2 Dead

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:16 am

A UPS cargo plane crashed near the airport in Birmingham, Ala., Wednesday morning. The pilot and co-pilot were both killed.

The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
5:43 am
Wed August 14, 2013

A Postman's 1963 Walk For Justice, Cut Short On An Alabama Road

Civil rights activist William Moore made several one-man marches for racial equality. In April 1963, he was killed during a march from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss.
Baltimore Sun

In April of 1963, a Baltimore mailman set off to deliver the most important letter in his life — one he wrote himself. William Lewis Moore decided to walk along Highway 11 from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., hoping to hand-deliver his letter to Gov. Ross Barnett. Moore wanted Barnett to fundamentally change Mississippi's racial hierarchy — something unthinkable for a Southern politician at the time.

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