U.S. News

Sports
3:12 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Broncos Blow Out Ravens At NFL Season Opener

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 3:20 pm

After a slow, lightning-delayed, start, creaky, old Peyton Manning exploded in front a national television audience. The Denver Broncos quarterback eviscerated the defending Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens in the opening game of the NFL season with a record-tying seven touchdown passes. Will Manning's performance help fans forget a worrisome offseason full of concussion litigation and uncertainty? The league hopes so. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis joins Robert Siegel to talk about the upcoming NFL season.

Education
3:12 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Cash-Strapped Philadelphia Schools Ask Parents To Fill Gaps

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 3:20 pm

The Philadelphia school system was forced to cut millions of dollars from its budget, lay off hundreds of employees and shutter nearly two dozen schools to help close a billion dollar shortfall. Some principals are asking parents to "contribute" as much as $600 per student to help pay for basic supplies and the school superintendent threatened to delay the start of classes this month until the city kicked in $50 million to cover the minimum level of staffing.

Pop Culture
3:12 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

After Dave Chappelle Hates On Hartford, Who's To Blame?

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 3:20 pm

Comedian Dave Chappelle caused some controversy at a comedy festival in Hartford, Conn. last week, after he got upset at hecklers and walked off stage. Depending on who you ask, Hartford was a horrible, racist audience — or just had a bad night.

It's All Politics
2:46 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

GOP Congressman: 'Constitutional Crisis' If Obama Bucks Vote

Indiana Rep. Luke Messer is one of few House Republicans who publicly back military action in Syria.
Michael Conroy AP

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 4:49 pm

President Obama on Friday declined to say whether he'd go ahead with military action in Syria if Congress votes against it — a what-if scenario that's attracting growing attention in the wake of preliminary House head counts that suggest there's nowhere near enough votes for passage.

It's a question that won't be answered until late next week when Congress is expected to vote.

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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

State Department Orders U.S. Personnel Out Of Lebanon

Supporters of the Syrian regime demonstrate in front of the U.S. Embassy east of Beirut on Friday.
Hussein Malla Associated Press

The State Department has ordered all nonessential U.S. government personnel out of Lebanon and approved a voluntary evacuation of Turkey ahead of a possible strike on Syria.

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Code Switch
11:03 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Did The NAACP Learn Anything From Meeting With The KKK?

NAACP leaders from the Casper, Wyo., branch speak with members of the KKK at a heavily guarded meeting this past week.
Alan Rogers Casper Star-Tribune

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 8:36 pm

"I think all my first dates were probably less awkward than this," says Jeremy Fugleberg, referring to the NAACP's meeting on Saturday night with the Ku Klux Klan in a hotel conference room in Casper, Wyo. Fugleberg is assistant managing editor for news at the Casper Star-Tribune and reported on the gathering.

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Race
10:04 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Did The NAACP Learn Anything From Meeting With The Klan?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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StoryCorps
12:53 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Remembering A Boss Who Led A Team To Safety On Sept. 11

Connie Labetti, 52, was able to escape one of the World Trade Center buildings on Sept. 11, 2001, thanks to her boss, Ron Fazio.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 11:46 am

Connie Labetti worked on the 99th floor of the south tower — the second World Trade Center tower to be hit on Sept. 11, 2001.

She made it out of the building thanks to her boss, Ron Fazio. He, however, did not survive. Fazio was one of 176 Aon employees who died that day. He was 57.

"He's the reason I'm here, there's no question about it," 52-year-old Labetti says. "Most of us survived that day because of him."

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The Two-Way
4:39 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

German Police Raid Christian Sect For Alleged Child Abuse

View of the village of Klosterzimmern near Deiningen, Germany on Friday. The village is home to the religious community 'Zwoelf Staemme' ('Twelve Tribes').
Daniel Karmann EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 11:31 am

Two communities affiliated with a U.S.-founded Christian sect have been raided by German police, who removed 40 children after allegations of abuse.

Officials say they acted after receiving evidence of ongoing child abuse at the two communities in Bavaria belonging to the Twelve Tribes, according to Germany's Spiegel Online.

According to the BBC, more than 100 officers were part of the operation to remove the children, who were placed in temporary foster homes.

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Sports
4:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Broncos, Ravens Pick Up Where They Left Off In NFL Opener

The NFL season kicks off Thursday night, with reigning champs the Baltimore Ravens taking on the Denver Broncos. Pro football has some new rules and the league just settled a multi-million dollar class action lawsuit with players.

Around the Nation
4:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Finding A Sister City Is A Bit Like Dating

It seems most decent-sized cities in the U.S. have a "sister city" — a companion community in a foreign country. Some even have more than one. But how these cities end up selecting each other is a lot like the dating scene.

Health
4:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Percentage Of U.S. Teens Using E-Cigarettes Doubles

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:21 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block. The percentage of middle and high school students who use electronic cigarettes has more than doubled. That's according to a report out today from the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. As NPR's Patti Neighmond reports, federal health officials are worried about the safety and addictive potential of E-cigarettes.

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Middle East
4:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Few Americans Support A Western-Led Military Strike In Syria

We hear the opinions of people around the country on Thursday as Congress considers whether the U.S. should launch a military strike in Syria.

Arts & Life
4:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Swing Your Partner: W.Va. Circles Back To Square Dancing

A couple takes to the floor in Harmon, W.Va., in 2012. West Virginia is trying to revitalize its square-dance tradition.
Jessie Wright-Mendoza for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:21 pm

Square dancing, once a pillar of small-town life, is making a comeback in West Virginia. A statewide project is trying to help communities preserve and promote this part of their cultural heritage.

Marlinton, W.Va., is one of the towns taking up the cause. Its square dances can gather a crowd, but residents still worry about attracting the attention of the next generation.

If you go to a square dance in Marlinton, there are some rules to follow. First of all, leave your stereotypes at the door, says Becky Hill, who works on The Mountain Dance Trail initiative.

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It's All Politics
4:03 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Even In An Obama Stronghold, Voters Saying 'No' On Syria

Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., gestures as he speaks in an Oversight Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in May 22.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 4:31 pm

Among the hurdles in the House to authorizing U.S. strikes on Syria: Many lawmakers say that back home there's very little support for military action.

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U.S.
3:16 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

BP Wants To Halt Deepwater Horizon Claims Process

Crude oil that leaked from the Deepwater Horizon oil rig sits on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010.
Chris Graythen Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:21 pm

BP is fighting the settlement it agreed to last summer that let the oil company avoid thousands of potential lawsuits over the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

Just after the spill, when oil was still gushing into the Gulf, BP touted the $20 billion it set aside for claims. But now it says the claim process is corrupt and is hoping a court will overturn the settlement that established the claims fund.

Ending the claims would mean stopping a well-oiled machine.

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Around the Nation
2:26 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Sailors With Disabilities Find Freedom On The Water

Members of the Bay Area Association of Disabled Sailors sail every weekend near San Francisco's Pier 40. The all-volunteer group serves people with a range of physical, developmental and mental disabilities.
Emily Green for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:21 pm

If you think sailing at 40 mph sounds challenging, imagine doing it all alone without the use of your arms or legs, or without hearing or with limited vision. Every weekend in San Francisco, a group of sailors with disabilities does just that, taking to the water to push their bodies to the limit.

Cristina Rubke and her father, Chris, are members of the Bay Area Association of Disabled Sailors. On a recent Saturday, they were at San Francisco's Pier 40, where the dock is awash in activity.

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The Two-Way
12:16 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

The Incredible Case Of The Bank Robber Who's Now A Law Clerk

After serving almost 11 years in federal prison for bank robbery, Shon Hopwood is a law student at the University of Washington. He's landed a prestigious law clerk's position with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.
Sang Cho Courtesy of The Daily of the University of Washington

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 12:03 pm

"I had no prior history with the law other than breaking it."

"I thought, 'this kid is a punk.' "

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Shots - Health News
8:28 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Parents' Harsh Words Might Make Teen Behaviors Worse

Sure you're steamed. But teenagers tend to meet harsh words with even worse behavior, a study says.
Katherine Streeter

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 11:56 am

Most parents yell at their kids at some point. It often feels like the last option for getting children to pay attention and shape up.

But harsh verbal discipline may backfire. Teenagers act worse if they're yelled at, a study finds.

Researchers asked parents of 13-year-olds in the Philadelphia area how often in the past year they'd yelled, cursed or called the kid "dumb or lazy or some other word like that" after he or she had done something wrong.

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National Security
3:08 am
Thu September 5, 2013

What Should Be On New FBI Director's To-Do List?

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 4:58 am

For the first time in years, there's new leadership at the FBI. Attorney General Eric Holder conducted the swearing-in ceremony on Wednesday. While Jim Comey starts his job Thursday, he's been working to get ready for years — preparing for threats ranging from terrorist bombings to cyber attacks.

U.S.
1:26 am
Thu September 5, 2013

More Cities Sweeping Homeless Into Less Prominent Areas

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 4:58 am

In North Carolina, a fight is brewing over the homeless in the capital city of Raleigh. Elected leaders have asked charitable and religious groups to stop their long-standing tradition of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends.

But advocates for the poor say the city is trying to push the homeless out of a neighborhood that business leaders want to spruce up.

'I Will Arrest You'

Almost every day, the Rev. Hugh Hollowell walks through Moore Square, a centuries-old city park in downtown Raleigh.

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Around the Nation
1:25 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Forget Twitter. In St. Louis, Bare Your Soul Via Typewriter

Goldkamp also keeps an index card file of choice words to integrate into his poem when he has trouble finding the right words.
Erin Williams STL Public Radio

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:10 pm

Typically, 21st century writers fall into two technical categories: Mac or PC. But poet Henry Goldkamp would much rather use a typewriter. He's the sole owner of a mobile poetry business, and for the past three years, he's spent his weekends traveling St. Louis, banging out short poems, on the spot, for anyone who stops by his table.

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Food
3:27 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Fixing Stove Hoods To Keep Pollution Out Of The Kitchen

Cooking on gas and electric stoves can create indoor air pollution. The best way to avoid it is to buy a good range hood that vents outside, experts say.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:47 pm

Hot summer days often mean air pollution warnings in big cities. But the air inside your kitchen can sometimes be just as harmful. Cooking fumes from your stove are supposed to be captured by a hood over the range — but even some expensive models aren't that effective.

Jennifer Logue spends a lot of time thinking about what happens when she cooks. She's a research scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, where she studies indoor air pollution.

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Shots - Health News
3:27 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Bill Clinton Steps Up To Dispel The Confusion Over Obamacare

He's back! Unabashed wonk and former president Bill Clinton detangles the health care law.
Danny Johnston Associated Press

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:22 pm

With the launch of the major piece of the Affordable Care Act less than a month away, the Obama administration is escalating the public relations push with one of their most effective weapons – former President Bill Clinton, now known to many as explainer in chief.

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The Two-Way
2:41 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Montana Prosecutors Will Appeal 30-Day Rape Sentence

Protesters gathered outside the Yellowstone County Courthouse in Billings, Mont., on Thursday, call for the resignation of a state judge over comments he made about the teenage victim in a rape case.
Matt Brown AP

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 5:01 pm

Montana prosecutors on Wednesday decided to appeal a 30-day jail sentence given to a former teacher who admitted to raping a 14-year-old student.

District Judge G. Todd Baugh unleashed a firestorm of criticism when he issued the lenient sentence saying that the victim, who later committed suicide, "seemed older than her chronological age."

The former teacher, Stacey Dean Rambold, 54, has already begun serving his sentence.

The AP reports:

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Around the Nation
2:36 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Ohio Kidnapper Ariel Castro Commits Suicide In Prison

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:22 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Just months after Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight escaped from years of captivity in a house in Cleveland, their captor is dead. Ariel Castro was found hanging in his prison cell last night. His death has now been ruled a suicide. From member station WCPN, Nick Castele reports.

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U.S.
2:36 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Why Do Chemical Weapons Evoke Such A Strong Reaction?

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:22 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It took more than two years and at least 100,000 lives lost for the U.S. government to threaten Syria with military action. The catalyst was the Syrian military's alleged use of chemical weapons. President Obama called the attack on August 21st an assault on human dignity.

NPR's Jackie Northam examines why chemical weapons evoke such a strong and different reaction than conventional weapons.

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Energy
2:36 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Native Americans Camp Out To Protest Wis. Mining Project

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 3:27 pm

A dispute over a proposed iron ore mine in Wisconsin has spilled into the nearby woods. Native Americans have set up a camp to protect land near the mine site and say federal treaty rights allow the campers to stay.

Around the Nation
2:36 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Miss., Texas Won't Offer VA Benefits To Same-Sex Partners

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:22 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

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Energy
2:36 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Neigbhors Call For Notice When Fracking Moves In Next Door

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 3:27 pm

The practice of hydraulic fracturing is something typically associated with fields and open land. But it's not uncommon in Colorado and other states for a residential neighborhood to become the site of oil and gas activity.

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